Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Poster Assignments
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Poster Assignments

1,250
views

Published on


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,250
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Look at the Layout, the balance between words and images,
  • Put main ideas in main clauses; put supporting ideas in subordinate clauses.
  • “moving in close”
  • The sentence might read: The first Literature Pedagogy workshop topic is Course Design, to which all graduate students, faculty, and staff are welcome. The series, organized by the English Graduate Organization and scheduled to take place on Feb. 22, 2013 in the Bundy Reading Room, will feature the speakers Dr. Campbell and Dr. Irom.
  • The sentence might read: The first Literature Pedagogy workshop topic is Course Design, to which all graduate students, faculty, and staff are welcome. The series, organized by the English Graduate Organization and scheduled to take place on Feb. 22, 2013 in the Bundy Reading Room, will feature the speakers Dr. Campbell and Dr. Irom.
  • The sentence might read: The first Literature Pedagogy workshop topic is Course Design, to which all graduate students, faculty, and staff are welcome. The series, organized by the English Graduate Organization and scheduled to take place on Feb. 22, 2013 in the Bundy Reading Room, will feature the speakers Dr. Campbell and Dr. Irom.
  • Look at the Layout, the balance between words and images,
  • Transcript

    • 1. Poster Assignments Promoting Critical Thinking, Design Literacy, and Rhetorical Awareness Leeann Hunter A p r i l 8 , 2 0 1 3Clinical Assistant Professor leeann.hunter@wsu.eduDepartment of English www.leeannhunter.comWashington State University Twitter: @ldhunter
    • 2. Poster Assignments: AgendaPart 1. Cognitive Benefits What is a poster, and what can we gain from a poster assignment?Part 2. Sample Assignment How are posters relevant to the Arts & Humanities? What might an assignment look like?Part 3. Poster Exhibits What do we do with the posters when we’re done? Why should we exhibit them?
    • 3. Cognitive Benefits of Poster Assignments• Focus and sort important concepts and details• Categorize concepts according to qualitative characteristics• Compare and contrast categories of information• Draw conclusions from aggregated research• Communicate concepts in linguistic, visual, and spatial modes
    • 4. Create EmphasisIn a world overwhelmed bytoo much information, youmust create EMPHASIS inyour materials so that youcan:• Attract your intended audience• Make your message heard. Image: “Information Is Beautiful” By jamjar on Flickr Creative Commons
    • 5. Emphasis: Linguistic Expression Guitars Special Bass GuitarClarissa has many guitars. She Among Clarissa’s many guitars, alikes to play them all. She likes single one stands out: the sleekto play the sleek mahogany bass mahogany body of her bassguitar. guitar.1. Clarissa has many guitars. 1. Among Clarissa’s many2. She likes to play them all. guitars, 3. She likes to play the sleek 2. a single one stands out:  mahogany bass guitar. 3. the sleek mahogany bass guitar.
    • 6. Emphasis: Visual Expression Photographs: Nick Lee, WSU Student
    • 7. Multimodal Processing“Trying to capture the movement “If we restrict students to word-of a deer on ice in language is based planning activities (forclearly a kind of translation. Even generating ideas, for definingwhen the planning process rhetorical purpose, for analyzingrepresents one’s thoughts inwords, that representation is audience), we may be undulyunlikely to be in the elaborate limiting their ability to think deeplysyntax of written English. So the about their rhetorical tasks.”writer’s task is to translate ameaning.” --Jason Palmeri, Remixing Composition: A History of --Linda Flower and John Hayes, Multimodal Writing Pedagogy “A Cognitive Process Theory of (2012) Writing” (1981)
    • 8. The Standard EssayStudents shape their ideas into alinguistic mode of expression thathas specific expectations:• An introduction that makes an argument and announces the topic.• Body paragraphs that support the thesis in well-organized individual units• A conclusion that leaves the reader with a full sense of the supported argument. Source: CDU Learn Online
    • 9. The Burger EssayNotice how we are using visualand spatial reasoning to teach thestandard essay format. Source: SparkNotes, Guide to SAT Writing
    • 10. The Poster Essay: Spatial ReasoningBy design, students organize theirideas spatially, categorizing eachelement of their overall project.Each area is visually expressive—the main content iscommunicated in an instant—and any shortcomings in the mainargument and supporting areasare quickly revealed. Source: University of Wisconsin-Madison, Writing Center
    • 11. Literature Pedagogy A Spring 2013 Workshop Series Organized by The English Graduate Organization Organization of Fe b r u a r y 2 2 , 2 0 1 3 DataLiterature Pedagogy Workshop Course DesignCourse Design Sp e a k e r sEnglish Graduate Organization Dr. Donna CampbellSpring 2013 Dr. Bimbisar IromSpeaker: Dr. CampbellSpeaker: Dr. Irom M od era tor Dr. Todd ButlerModerator: Dr. ButlerFebruary 22, 2013 Bu n d y Rea d in g Room12:10-1:00 1 2 :1 0 - 1 :0 0Bundy Reading Room All graduate students, instructors, faculty, and staff are welcome!All are welcome to attend For more information, contact Aree Metz (a.metz@wsu.edu)Contact information Workshop materials and podcasts will be made available at:Website information http://litpedagogy.omeka.net
    • 12. 2 Literature Pedagogy A Spring 2013 Workshop Series Organized by The English Graduate Organization 1 Hierarchy of Data Fe b r u a r y 2 2 , 2 0 1 3Level 1: Discussion Topic, Variable Course DesignLevel 2: Series Title, Fixed Sp e a k e r sLevel 3: Featured Speakers Dr. Donna CampbellLevel 4: Time and Location Dr. Bimbisar Irom 3Level 5: Details M od era tor Dr. Todd Butler Bu n d y Rea d in g Room 1 2 :1 0 - 1 :0 0 4 All graduate students, instructors, faculty, and staff are welcome! For more information, contact Aree Metz (a.metz@wsu.edu) Workshop materials and podcasts will be made available at: http://litpedagogy.omeka.net 5
    • 13. Literature Pedagogy A Spring 2013 Workshop Series Organized by The English Graduate Organization Parallel Data Fe b r u a r y 2 2 , 2 0 1 3Workshop Series Course DesignWorkshop Series Details Sp e a k e r s Dr. Donna CampbellDiscussion Topic Dr. Bimbisar IromFeatured Speakers M od era tor Dr. Todd ButlerDateLocation and Time Bu n d y Rea d in g Room 1 2 :1 0 - 1 :0 0 All graduate students, instructors, faculty, and staff are welcome! For more information, contact Aree Metz (a.metz@wsu.edu) Workshop materials and podcasts will be made available at: http://litpedagogy.omeka.net
    • 14. Posters in theArts and Humanities Special Considerations
    • 15. InspirationRoger Whitson hosted a posterexhibit during Spring 2009 atGeorgia Tech.His students showcased theirresearch in the Salman Rushdiearchives at Emory University.
    • 16. Poster Assignment: Studies in the HumanitiesWork in small groups to designtwo digital posters that representyour perspectives on ruin in thelong nineteenth century. Oneposter will be creative and theother poster will be academic.Selected Objectives• Synthesize the work you have produced this semester into a compact visual presentation• Communicate your scholarly production to a public audience http://www.leeannhunter.com/humanities/
    • 17. Poster 1: Creative• Genre: creative and contemporary, exhibiting the original work of group members.• Content: your best creative work this semester, revised if necessary.• Format: a creative and expressive design that best highlights your artistic visions.
    • 18. Poster 2: Academic• Genre: analytical and historical, highlighting literature, art, and philosophy that has inspired you this semester.• Content: critical reflections on the art presented in Poster 1.• Format: designed as a companion to the creative piece, but the information should be presented in a traditional 3-column format.
    • 19. Sample Content Areas in the Arts and Humanities• Argument or thesis• Theoretical framework• Methodology• Research• Historical events• Texts or artworks• Artist statements• Contemporary media
    • 20. Poster Exhibits
    • 21. Poster Presentation: Nonverbal 1. Dress professionally, arrive early, and clear your area of excess personal items. 2. Focus your attention on visitors to the exhibit: invite and welcome them to view your display. Smile, shake hands, and introduce yourself. 3. Take turns conversing with visitors about different sections of your posters. One member of the group should not dominate the conversation, no matter how eloquent they are. 4. Encourage visitors to ask questions, so that your conversation is more interactive than one-sided.
    • 22. Poster Presentation: Oral1. Before you start, ask your visitors about their familiarity with the exhibit’s topic and your specific poster content. Avoid making assumptions about your listeners’ knowledge.2. Present what is common about your subject matter before presenting your unique perspective on it (how will they know it’s unique if they don’t know what’s common?).3. Move back and forth between your big ideas and your small examples. Details are important, but only if they fit into a larger context, and a big idea can only make an impact if you illustrate it with specific details.4. Observe your audience while you are speaking–do they seem to be following along? are they showing genuine interest in your work? Change the direction of your conversation if something doesn’t seem to be going well.
    • 23. Poster Printing• Poster Dimensions: 20 inches x 30 inches (landscape or portrait)• Print Quality: Matte (@$18 for a 20×30 poster)• Display Options: Foam core w/ easels or Bulletin boards w/ pins• WSU Printer Locations: Biomedical Communications Unit (BCU) School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering
    • 24. Poster Design ResourcesAvailable Online• WSU: How To Create a Poster Using PowerPoint (PDF)• U of North Colorado: How to Create an Academic Poster (YouTube)• C.R.A.P. Design Principles (Contrast, Repetition, Alignment, Proximity)For Purchase• ix: Visualizing Composition 2.0• The Non-Designer’s Design Book
    • 25. Discussion• How do you use posters in your discipline?• When thinking about adding posters to your syllabus, what challenges do you anticipate?• How do posters meet general learning outcomes in similar or different ways from traditional essays?• At what point and to what extent should we educate students in visual rhetoric and design?