733 pp
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

733 pp

on

  • 306 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
306
Views on SlideShare
306
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

733 pp 733 pp Presentation Transcript

  • Stiletto Gas Pedals and Back Alley Parking: Exploring Audience, Space, and the Rhetorical Construction of Female Reproduction
  • In the beginning. . .
    Teaching Chevy Equinox as audience invention
    carved-out door panels, to help keep diamond rings from getting whacked when window switches are used
    center console spacious enough to stow a handbag
    tilted accelerator pedal “that makes driving in high heels safer and more comfortable”(Fetini 2010).
  • Space As Rhetoric
  • Old Epistemologies and New Rhetoric: Building a Theory of Feminine Negotiation of Audience
    Ong
    Lundsford/Ede
    Burke
    Epistemology of Experience
    Recovering silenced rhetoric of reproductive rights movements illustrate the ways in which particularly female concerns and goals get accomplished by successfully inventing bot
    Female rhetor/audience
    Male audience
  • New Theory Formed:
  • Brief History of Western Rhetoric Concerning Choice in Motherhood
  • American Rhetoric of Reproduction: Disruptions of Silence
    First Wave
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton
    Susan B. Anthony
    Margaret Sanger
  • Movements Attempting to Give Voice to the Abortion
    Second/Third Wave:
    Steinmem’s List
    Red Stockings
    “I had an abortion” Campaign
  • A History reflected through designed Space
    Planned Parenthood Clinics negotiate multiple audiences
    Images/Analysis
  • Scholarly and Pedagogical Implications
    Designed spaces can help teach audience – and particularly how audience is invented and subjects asked to understand themselves
    Space can illustrate the ways in which institutions “other” individuals and even their own function/role in a society
    Providing visual and material examples of how rhetoric and audience interact to produce meaning, often meaning that is repressive, can engage students and give them a way to understand traditional texts through similar theoretical frame