Industrial Revolution - Transportation

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Industrial Revolution - Transportation

  1. 1. Industrial Revolution Transportation
  2. 2. Industrial Revolution New inventions change the way goods were made. People began using machines instead of hand tools. The Industrial Revolution changed the way people in the United States lived, traveled, and worked.
  3. 3. Transportation - New Roads Until 1803 roads were dirt paths full of tree stumps and holes. In 1803, Congress voted to build the first National Road to Ohio. It was level, and it was paved with stones and tar.
  4. 4. Transportation By 1860 there were more than 88,000 miles of roads in the United States. Traveling by road however, still cost a lot of money and took a long time.
  5. 5. Transportation - Canals In 1817 New York began building the Erie Canal, a waterway connecting Lake Erie to the Hudson River. It was built by 1825 and cut the price of shipping goods between New York City and Buffalo from $100 a ton to $10 a ton.
  6. 6. Transportation By the 1830’s canals were being dug all over the country.
  7. 7. Transportation - Steam Engine The Steam Engine helped steamboats to become the most popular form of river travel and railroads changed the way people and goods moved on land.
  8. 8. Transportation - Steam Boats Steamboats became bigger and faster, that meant more cargo and passengers could be delivered in a shorter amount of time. This meant bigger profits for cargo companies and their customers.
  9. 9. Transportation - Railroads The steam locomotive was now being used to power railroad engines by 1830. Up until then companies used railroad cars pulled by horses.
  10. 10. Transportation - Railroads The number of railroads grew quickly after 1830, by 1850 about 9,000 miles of track crossed the nation, mostly joining cities in the East. Railroads made it easier and cheaper to move heavy loads of raw materials and manufactured goods to all regions of the country. As railroads grew, so did manufacturing in the United States.

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