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quality 101

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the basics of quality (in my opinion)

the basics of quality (in my opinion)

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  • :: Thanks for taking the time
    :: Difficult to boil lean and quality down to 15 mins
  • Deming called this: “Consistency of Purpose”
    Not short-term initiatives or a set of tools
    Senior Management -
    :: start with the goal of generating value from the customer
    :: create a shared sense of purpose
    :: managers should be aware of the shadows they cast (explain)
    started to use Strategy Deployment (Hoshin Planning) at Parker
    KEY x 2
    Explain matrix
    WHAT DOES A LEAN SYSTEM LOOK LIKE?
  • PLS similar to Toyota Production System or Thinking Production System
    In summary:
    KEY
    In, Lean Thinking 5 key principles of this system are identified.
    1 / Identify value through the customer’s eyes
    define value in terms of:
    :: specific products with
    :: specific capabilities offered at
    :: specific prices through a dialogue with
    :: specific customers.
    Providing the wrong good or service the right way is waste.
    :: QFD / WINMAP / WINVALUE
    2 / Define the Value Stream
    The value stream is the set of all the specific actions required to bring a specific product through:
    :: concept to design to engineering to launch,
    :: order-taking through detailed scheduling to delivery
    :: raw materials to finished product into the customers’ hands
    3 / Flow
    Flow value to the customer at the rate of customer demand, without waste in all of its forms.
    When we cannot flow, we Pull.
    EXAMPLE OF PULL
  • Why is a vending machine a good example of a pull system?
    the customer pulls product from the vending machine:
    :: the exact item
    :: quantity wanted
    :: and at the time it is needed
    :: Then, the supplier replenishes only the items that need to be replaced.
    Talk about 5 / Perfection later.
    NEXT, QUALITY SYSTEMS
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Imbalanced work cycle times
    Intermittent work stoppages: lack of parts
    Slow change-overs
  • Implemented many quality systems:
    :: 9001
    :: 13485
    Also, 14001, 18001
    Example:
    Manage quality at 3 UK plants and support to Oxnard
    Sheffield
    The model itself is sound: <<run through 9001 model>>
    Cover processes in more detail later
    I SEE QUALITY SYSTEMS LIKE THIS ….
  • “wedge” that …
    :: holds the EVOLUTIONARY gains achieved along the quality journey
    :: prevents good practices from slipping
    Example:
    Customer audits at Birtley
  • Diagram from Deming
    KEY x 2
    Management are responsible for developing stable, capable processes
    Gives
    :: repeatable work, reliable equipment, minimal quality issues
    - 5S (identify big wastes) and
    - standard work
    :: identify the basic work steps,
    :: record the time for each step,
    :: draw a picture of the work area and operators flow
    Foundation for value added flow
    DEVELOPING STABLE, CAPABLE PROCESSES IS NOT EASY … WHY?
  • Demings Red Bead Training Activity:
    :: Illustrates Operators are at the mercy of a process that is not capable, but are expected by their management to produce good parts.
    - Variation is any deviation from target.
    - Too much variation causes poor quality!
    KEY
    Variation exists in all of these categories
    KEY
    There are two types of variation: - Common Causes - Special Causes
    Our job is to seek out and find variation (SPC)
    :: then eliminate it :: reduce, or :: control it.
    As stability and capability is a pre-requisite for creating flow
    HOW? ….
  • One person does not have all the answers
    The people working on the process each day are the experts
    Example:
    :: What I done when I first became a manager (monkeys)
    :: Move towards coaching, forced: team size
    Example:
    HPWT
    :: Set team guidelines: expected behaviours and standards
    :: Charter: Why we exist
    :: Barriers which exist stop us from achieving the Charter
    :: Empower the team to remove the barriers
    :: Define boundary conditions
    - multi-skilling
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Break down the job - Present the operation
    - what to do, - how to do, - why you have to do it
    Try under supervision - Ongoing support
  • KEY
    CONSIDER THE STAKEHOLDERS INVOLVED IN THE CHANGE ….
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Increase urgency - inspire people to move, make objectives real and relevant.
    Build the guiding team - get the right people in place with the right emotional commitment, and the right mix of skills and levels.
    Get the vision right - get the team to establish a simple vision and strategy, focus on emotional and creative aspects necessary to drive service and efficiency.
    Communicate for buy-in - Involve as many people as possible, communicate the essentials, simply, and to appeal and respond to people's needs. De-clutter communications - make technology work for you rather than against.
    Empower action - Remove obstacles, enable constructive feedback and lots of support from leaders - reward and recognise progress and achievements.
    Create short-term wins - Set aims that are easy to achieve - in bite-size chunks. Manageable numbers of initiatives. Finish current stages before starting new ones.
    Don't let up - Foster and encourage determination and persistence - ongoing change - encourage ongoing progress reporting - highlight achieved and future milestones.
    Make change stick - Reinforce the value of successful change via recruitment, promotion, new change leaders. Weave change into culture.
  • LHS – CAVEmen
    Citizens, Against, Virtually, Everything
    :: 80 / 20 rule – 80% of your time is spent on 20% of the people involved
    Example:
    Parker change loop - explain
    :: Begin with the end in mind
    :: Active dissatisfaction
    :: WDGLL
    :: Future state
    CHANGE OFTEN IS REACTIVE ….
  • KEY
    Treat problems as opportunities for improvement rather than opportunities to assign blame
    :: When a problem occurs, the first thing people want to know is "who did it?“
    :: Operator error = root cause, re-training
    :: Problem occurs again
    KEY
    Problems must be treated as "system" failures rather than people failures.  
    :: Earlier slide (94%) – people are at the mercy of the system or process
    KEY
    All employees must be empowered to identify and solve problems. 
    :: Earlier slide – coordinated team effort
    :: process which people can identify
    :: solve or elevate problems to be addressed.
    IN PARKER WE USE THE A3 PROCESS …..
  • CAPA processes form part of the quality system
    Sometimes too constraining when looking at themes
    Intimidating for Operators
    KEY
    :: Explain A3
    If you can explain the issue on 1 sheet of A3, you truly understand the problem
    KEY
    FINALLY
  • Mentioned earlier 5th point from “LEAN THINKING”
    This is the concept that defines CI as a journey, not a destination.
    CI is a process that is repeated continuously.
    As one level is achieved, the next opportunities for CI reveal themselves.
    Changes can be evolutionary (like the quality system wedge) or ….
    KEY
    Revolutionary or step-changes
    KEY MESSAGE
    :: continuously pursue perfection.
    :: don’t become complacent
    Leave the last word to Deming ,,,,
    KEY
  • Transcript

    • 1. PLS Six Sigma Orientation Parker Confidential 1the way we things Lean and Quality Overview  Robert Thompson
    • 2. PLS Six Sigma Orientation Parker Confidential 2the way we things Lean and Quality  Objectives  Brief overview of some fundamentals behind lean and quality (8)  Not an exhaustive list  Doesn't go into the detail  My opinions, you may disagree?
    • 3. PLS Six Sigma Orientation Parker Confidential 3the way we things Lean and quality are long-term philosophies Top managers and middle managers must be bold enough to delegate as much authority as possible. It is a management system in which all employees participate, from the top down and from the bottom up … Ishikawa, K. 1985. What is Total Quality Control?: The Japanese Way With hoshin kanri... the daily crush of events and quarterly bottom-line pressures do not take precedence over strategic plans, rather, these short-term activities are determined and managed by the plans themselves … Akao, Yoji, ed (Jap: 1988, Eng: 1991) Hoshin Kanri, policy deployment for successful TQM
    • 4. PLS Six Sigma Orientation Parker Confidential 4the way we things •Selection •Common Goals •Cross-Training Fastest to Mark et , Highest Qualit y, Low est Cost through Short ening t he Value Stream Just-in-Time Jidoka Empow ered Employees Lean Fundam entals Tracking Centers & Strategy Deployment Orientation Training Day by Hour Tracking 5S + Safety Automatic Stops Standard Work/ Management Audits Total Productive Maintenance Value Stream Mapping Quick Changeover Pull Systems Continuous Flow (Site, Cell) Six Sigma Quality Control Andon Leveled Production Takt Time Planning Integrated Logistics •Team Improvement Process •Kaizen •5 Why’s •Eyes for Waste •Problem Solving Continuous Improvement Error Proofing Plan For Every Part Visual Controls •Selection •Common Goals •Cross-Training Fastest to Mark et , Highest Qualit y, Low est Cost through Short ening t he Value Stream Just-in-Time Jidoka Empow ered Employees Lean Fundam entals Tracking Centers & Strategy Deployment Orientation Training Day by Hour Tracking 5S + Safety Automatic Stops Standard Work/ Management Audits Total Productive Maintenance Value Stream Mapping Quick Changeover Pull Systems Continuous Flow (Site, Cell) Six Sigma Quality Control Andon Leveled Production Takt Time Planning Integrated Logistics •Team Improvement Process •Kaizen •5 Why’s •Eyes for Waste •Problem Solving Continuous Improvement Error Proofing Plan For Every Part Visual Controls Parker Lean System 1. Identify value through the customer’s eyes 2. Define the value stream 3. Flow 4. Pull 5. Perfection Womack James P., Jones Daniel T. (2003), Lean Thinking: Banish Waste and Create Wealth in Your Corporation
    • 5. PLS Six Sigma Orientation Parker Confidential 5the way we things Pull
    • 6. PLS Six Sigma Orientation Parker Confidential 6the way we things Quality systems are important but don’t guarantee quality
    • 7. PLS Six Sigma Orientation Parker Confidential 7the way we things Quality systems are important but don’t guarantee quality
    • 8. PLS Six Sigma Orientation Parker Confidential 8the way we things Everything is a process Deming, W. Edwards (1986). Out of the Crisis A system must be managed. It will not manage itself. A bad system will beat a good person every time. Deming, W. Edwards. 1993. The New Economics for Industry 94 percent of the variation in any system is attributable to the system, not to the people working in the system Deming, W. Edwards. 1993. The New Economics for Industry
    • 9. PLS Six Sigma Orientation Parker Confidential 9the way we things Every process has variation If I had to reduce my message for management to just a few words, I’d say it all had to do with reducing variation. Deming
    • 10. PLS Six Sigma Orientation Parker Confidential 10the way we things Identifying and controlling variation requires a coordinated team effort
    • 11. PLS Six Sigma Orientation Parker Confidential 11the way we things Improvement requires change Improvement usually means doing something that we have never done before. - Shigeo Shingo
    • 12. PLS Six Sigma Orientation Parker Confidential 12the way we things Resistant Doesn’t Get In Way Driving Change WillGetOnBoard Early Adopters MustBe Shown/Convinced Will Resist AssistsInSetting DirectionAnd MakingItHappen ChangeAgents SelfSelectors Improvement requires change Spectrum of Involvement in Change
    • 13. PLS Six Sigma Orientation Parker Confidential 13the way we things Problems are opportunities Treat problems as opportunities for improvement rather than opportunities to assign blame Problems must be treated as "system" failures rather than people failures All employees must be empowered to identify and solve problems
    • 14. PLS Six Sigma Orientation Parker Confidential 14the way we things Problems are opportunities … every issue an organisation faces should be captured on a single sheet of paper. This enables everyone touching the issue to see it through the same lens Shook, J 2009, Managing to Learn
    • 15. PLS Six Sigma Orientation Parker Confidential 15the way we things Continuous improvement is endless A P C D A S C D Improvement Time Kaizen A S C D A S C D A P C D Kaizen 1. Masaaki Imai, Gemba Kaizen (New York: McGraw-Hill, 1997) It is not necessary to change. Survival is not mandatory Deming
    • 16. PLS Six Sigma Orientation Parker Confidential 16the way we things Thank you for listening