Grow in HR Career by Kallol
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Grow in HR Career by Kallol

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Presentation is all about the various functional roles in Human Resource and to help guide you select an appropriate profile to advance in HR career

Presentation is all about the various functional roles in Human Resource and to help guide you select an appropriate profile to advance in HR career

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  • 1. Grow in By Kallol Chakrabarty
  • 2. Objectives• Why HR• What is HR• HR Dream Profile’s
  • 3. Why HR• HR professionals are increasingly seen as integral to their companiessuccess• The work is rewarding and interesting• Human Resources span multiple disciplines and requires you to blend anunderstanding of human behavior with practical hands-on-tasks and hard-core business basics
  • 4. What is• HR Departments, formerly known as Personnel, dealt largely with theadministrative function of an organization, such as handling employeebenefits questions or recruiting, interviewing, and hiring new staff inaccordance with policies established by top management.• Todays, HR manages these tasks and also consult with top executivesregarding strategic planning.• Key Performance Criteria for HR involve enhancing morale andproductivity, limit job turnover(less employees leaving the company), andhelp organizations increase performance and improve business results,these workers also help their firms effectively use employee skills, providetraining and development opportunities to improve those skills, and increaseemployee’s satisfaction with their jobs and working conditions.• Dealing with people is an important part of the job
  • 5. HR Dream Jobs• Management Analyst• Payroll and Timekeeping Clerks• HR Generalist• Compensation Professional• HR Training Manager• HR Consultant• Labour Relations Specialist• Organisational Development Professional• Global HR Professional• HRIS Professional• Diversity and Inclusion Manager• Staffing and Recruitment• Talent Management
  • 6. Management Analyst Job Description• As business become more complex, firms are continually faced with newchallenges – Management Analyst help them remain competitive amidstthese changes.• Management Analysts might be single practitioners or part of largeinternational organizations employing thousands of other consultants.• These analysts specialize by type of business function such as HR,marketing, logistics or information systems.• Traits of these management analyst : Enjoys travelling and meeting withclients• Educational requirements for entry-level jobs in this field vary betweenprivate industry and government. Many employers in private industrygenerally seek individuals with a master’s degree in business administrationor a related discipline. Some employers also require additional years ofexperience in the field or industry in which the worker plans to consult• The pool of applicants from which employers can draw is quite large sinceanalysts can have very diverse educational backgrounds and workexperience
  • 7. Payroll and Time Keeping Clerks Job Description • Payroll and Time Keeping clerks are found in every industry • Most employers prefer applicants with a high school diploma; computer skills are desirable • Those who have completed a certification program , indicating that they can handle more complex payroll issues, will have advantage in the job market • Most employers prefer applicants with high school diploma or graduates in ARTs. Payroll and time keeping clerks train on the job, gaining skills by watching and learning from other workers. New Workers receive training in payroll, timekeeping, personnel issues, workplace practices, and company policies. • Job outlook slower-than-average job growth is expected. Those with certification program will have an advantage in the job market. As firms increasingly outsource the payroll function, most job growth is expected to be in companies that specialize in payroll – including companies in the employment services industry and the accounting tax preparation , book keeping, and payroll services industry
  • 8. HR Generalist Job Description• Are you the kind of person who likes to do a little of this and some of that?Then the role of HR generalist might be right for you• HR generalists wear many different hats. One minute you may be negotiatingyour company’s employee benefits package, and the next, you’re interviewinga candidate for a director-level position. To help determine if this is the right jobfor you, ask yourself the following questions: Do I enjoy changing gears on a moment’s notice? Am I open to learning about areas in which I currently have no expertise? Am I comfortable leaving a project unfinished to handle emergency situations? Do I consider myself fairly flexible?• The educational backgrounds of HR Generalists vary considerably, reflectingthe diversity of duties and levels of responsibility. In filling entry-level jobs,many employers seek college graduates who have majored in humanresources, human resources administration, or industrial and labor relations.Other employers look for college graduates with a technical or businessbackground or a well-rounded liberal arts education.• Employment of HR Generalists is expected to grow faster than the averagefor all occupations.
  • 9. Compensation Professional Job Description• Compensation professionals always seem to be in demand,regardless of what’s happening in the economy, and there always seems to bea shortage of well-qualified people in this area. The job requires strongtechnical skills as well as good people skills – a rare combination• Compensation professionals design reward systems that help companiesattract, retain and motivate their employees. This work requires numbercrunching and creativity. Because compensation packages are not one-size-fits-all products, people in this area need to think outside the box and be ableto perform a little magic when both candidates and money are scarce.Consider the following questions: Am I a detail-oriented person? Do I have an aptitude for numbers? Am I comfortable seeing other people’s salaries? Do I have strong communication skills?• The educational backgrounds of Compensation Professionals varyconsiderably, reflecting the diversity of duties and levels of responsibility. Infilling entry-level jobs, many employers seek college graduates who havemajored in human resources, human resources administration, or industrialand labor relations. Other employers look for college graduates with a technicalor business background or a well-rounded liberal arts education• Employment of Compensation Professional is expected to grow faster thanthe average for all occupations.
  • 10. HR Training Manager Job Description• The field of training and development (T&D) has changed substantially overthe last decade. In the old days, trainers were expected to teach employeeshow to do their jobs. Now, training professionals are responsible for buildingenvironments that embrace learning. Management and leadershipdevelopment is also an important part of the job• In some of the more forward-thinking companies, T&D professionals may beinvolved in designing distance learning programs as well as on-site, computer-based training programs. Before you raise your hand to take on this job,consider the following questions: Do you consider yourself a creative person with strong computer skills? Are you comfortable in front of an audience? How comfortable are you working on one very long project as opposed to lots of small projects? Are you passionate about learning and teaching others?• The educational backgrounds of HR Training Managers vary considerably,reflecting the diversity of duties and levels of responsibility. In filling entry-leveljobs, many employers seek college graduates who have majored in humanresources, human resources administration, or industrial and labor relations.Other employers look for college graduates with a technical or businessbackground or a well-rounded liberal arts education. • Employment of HR Training Manager is expected to grow faster than the average for all occupations.
  • 11. HR Consultant Job Description• HR Consultants usually have an expertise in one specialty area. The mostcommon ones are Compensation, Recruitment (especially ExecutiveRecruitment), HR Outsourcing and Leadership Coaching. You can work for afor a company or as an independent consultant. Most consultants have deepexpertise in their field, acquired through many years of work experience orthrough a Ph.D., or both. If you are interested in being an HR consultant it isbest to try at the beginning of your career so that you can be trained early, or10 years into it, so that you can claim considerable work experience• If you are considering a career as an HR Consultant, ask yourself thefollowing questions: Do you like working independently? Do you prefer to work on multiple, short-term projects instead of one long-term one? Are you comfortable with some variability in your pay? Are you willing to seek out customers instead of expecting them come to you?• The educational backgrounds of HR Consultants vary considerably, reflectingthe diversity of duties and levels of responsibility. In filling entry-level jobs,many employers seek college graduates who have majored in humanresources, human resources administration, or industrial and labor relations.Other employers look for college graduates with a technical or businessbackground or a well-rounded liberal arts education. • Employment of HR consultants is expected to grow faster than the average for all occupations.
  • 12. Labor Relations Specialist Job Description• An organization’s director of industrial relations forms labor policy, overseesindustrial labor relations, negotiates collective bargaining agreements, andcoordinates grievance procedures to handle complaints resulting frommanagement disputes with unionized employees. The director of industrialrelations also advises and collaborates with the director of human resources,other managers, and members of their staff, because all aspects of humanresources policy—such as wages, benefits, pensions, and work practices—may be involved in drawing up a new or revised union contract• Labor relations managers and their staffs implement industrial labor relationsprograms• Labor relations specialists prepare information for management to use duringcollective bargaining agreement negotiations, a process that requires thespecialist to be familiar with economic and wage data and to have extensiveknowledge of labor law and collective bargaining trends. The labor relationsstaff interprets and administers the contract with respect to grievances, wagesand salaries, employee welfare, health care, pensions, union and managementpractices, and other contractual stipulations. As union membership continuesto decline in most industries, industrial relations personnel are working moreoften with employees who are not members of a labor union.all occupations.
  • 13. Labor Relations Specialist Job Description• If you are considering a career as an Labor Relations, ask yourself thefollowing questions: Are you detail oriented ? Are you interested in employment law and its interpretation ? Do you have a penchant for negotiation and bargaining ?• The educational backgrounds of Labor Relations Specialists varyconsiderably, reflecting the diversity of duties and levels of responsibility. Infilling entry-level jobs, many employers seek college graduates who havemajored in human resources, human resources administration, or industrialand labor relations. Other employers look for college graduates with a technicalor business background or a well-rounded liberal arts education.• Employment of Labor Relation Specialist is expected to grow faster than theaverage for all occupations.• Works well to choose this line if you’re in the manufacturing sector
  • 14. Organizational Development Professional Job Description • Are you one of those people who embraces change? Then the field of organizational development may be just what you’re looking for. Organizational development professionals work closely with top management to ensure the organization’s design is closely aligned with the company’s goals, mission and vision. In this role, you may also do some training and development. • Things can get really hot in this field when a company goes through a major reorganization or merger. You may be required to work long hours when change is in the air. When considering this role, ask yourself: How well do you handle change? Do you enjoy putting together the pieces of a puzzle? How well do you perform during tumultuous times? Are you a big-picture person? • The educational backgrounds of Organizational Development Professionals vary considerably, reflecting the diversity of duties and levels of responsibility. In filling entry-level jobs, many employers seek college graduates who have majored in human resources, human resources administration, or industrial and labor relations. Other employers look for college graduates with a technical or business background or a well-rounded liberal arts education. • Employment of Organizational Development Professionals is expected to grow faster than the average for all occupations.
  • 15. Global HR Professional Job Description• With business and the economy becoming globally focused, many companiesare sending their employees overseas. This global workforce has created newcareer opportunities for job seekers interested in the human resources field. Aglobal human resources professional does a little bit of everything. Individualsbeing sent abroad by their companies have many questions and need a varietyof services coordinated, from getting the correct visas and figuring out salaryand tax status to obtaining settling-in services, housing assistance and cross-cultural training. HR professionals are responsible for pulling all of thisinformation together and making sure that all of the necessary hurdles (likevisas, for example) are taken care of so that ex pats have a smooth transitioninto their new work and living environments.• Some organizations use their internal human resources staff to provide suchservices, but many contract these services out to global relocation firms, whichare usually based in the US. But whether you are working for a specificcompany that provides information and support to its own employees or anorganization that specializes in global relocation, you need a certain core skillset that is slightly different from that of a human resources generalist.
  • 16. Global HR Professional Job Description• If you are considering a position as a global HR professional, ask yourself thefollowing questions: Are you detail oriented? Are you patient with people? Do you have strong interpersonal skills? Do you have good time management skills?• The educational backgrounds of global HR professionals vary considerably,reflecting the diversity of duties and levels of responsibility. In filling entry-leveljobs, many employers seek college graduates who have majored in humanresources, human resources administration, or industrial and labor relations.Other employers look for college graduates with a technical or businessbackground or a well-rounded liberal arts education.• Employment of Global HR Professional is expected to grow faster than theaverage for all occupations.
  • 17. HRIS Professional Job Description• Another area of HR without enough talent to meet demand is HumanResource Information Systems (HRIS).• Technology has become a key part of HR as companies look at ways tofunction more efficiently. HRIS products help them manage one of their mostimportant assets – their personnel.• As HRIS systems have become more sophisticated, the demand forexperienced professionals in this area has risen. HRIS professionals are ofteninvolved in product selection, systems customization, implementation andongoing administration. If you are extremely detail-oriented and enjoy workingwith computers, this might be the job for you. Ask yourself the following: Are my PC skills strong enough to be successful in this area? Am I comfortable working at a computer most of the day? Am I well organized? Am I detail-oriented enough to handle this position?• The educational backgrounds of HRIS Professionals vary considerably,reflecting the diversity of duties and levels of responsibility. In filling entry-leveljobs, many employers seek college graduates who have majored in humanresources, human resources administration, or industrial and labor relations.Other employers look for college graduates with a technical or businessbackground or a well-rounded liberal arts education. • Employment of HRIS Professional is expected to grow faster than the average for all occupations.
  • 18. Diversity and Inclusion Manager Job Description • Globalization and increased legal accountability have increased the demand for Diversity professionals. • Depending on the size of the company, Diversity and Inclusion professionals will ensure company compliance with federal and state affirmative action laws, report regularly on specific targets to the Government and other institutions, provide funding and corporate sponsorship to external organizations, and run programs within the company that encourage diversity and inclusion. In many companies, Diversity and Inclusion is a key initiative that has the attention of Senior Executives. • If you are considering a career in Diversity and Inclusion, ask yourself the following questions: Are you interested in working with Government and non-profit organizations? Can you multi-task effectively? Are you able to represent the interest of several groups, especially those are different from your own? Do you have effective presentation and influencing skills?
  • 19. Diversity and Inclusion Manager Job Description • The educational backgrounds of Diversity and Inclusion Managers vary considerably, reflecting the diversity of duties and levels of responsibility. In filling entry-level jobs, many employers seek college graduates who have majored in human resources, human resources administration, or industrial and labor relations. Other employers look for college graduates with a technical or business background or a well-rounded liberal arts education. • Employment of Diversity and Inclusion Manager is expected to grow faster than the average for all occupations.
  • 20. Staffing and Recruitment Specialist Job Description • Staffing, Recruitment and Placement professionals are often viewed as the most visible and important part of human resources. This is because staffing is the first entry point of prospective employees to the company. • Recruitment professionals are responsible for the staffing strategy for the organization or the company, the sourcing of candidates, screening and preliminary interviewing of candidates, conducting background checks and communicating decisions and compensation information. In larger companies, workforce planning which includes the projection of skills and attributes that will be required in the future, based on the business strategy and current demographics of the work force today, may be an integral part of a Staffing or Recruitment professional’s job. • Ask yourself the following questions, if you are considering a career as a Recruitment and Staffing professional: Can you relate to different types of people? Can you glean data from what is less than obvious? Are you willing to be aggressive, and perhaps get “no” for an answer? Do you have an ability to negotiate and work up to mutually beneficial agreements?
  • 21. Staffing and Recruitment Specialist Job Description • The Staffing and Recruiting industry offers opportunities in many occupations for workers with a variety of skill levels and experience. • The majority of temporary jobs still require only graduation from high school or the equivalent, while some permanent jobs, such as those in management, may require a bachelor’s or higher degree. • In general, the training requirements of temporary workers mirror those for permanent employees in the economy as a whole. As the industry expands to include various professional and managerial occupations, a growing number of jobs will require a bachelor’s or advanced degree. • Staffing and Recruiting has been one of the fastest growing industries in the nation.
  • 22. Talent Manager Job Description• Talent Management has increased in importance over the last decade. TalentManagement professionals are involved in the development and assessment ofemployees through the implementation of programs and initiatives.• Talent Management includes Goal Management, Performance Mapping,Development, Competencies, and Succession Planning and depending on theorganization, a professional may be working on all or individual parts.• Talent Management professionals may also need to have some technicalability as many talent assessment processes are now being automated as wellas some idea of statistics as measurement and assessment form an importantcomponent of this job. Proficiency in project and program management isessential.• If you are considering a career in Talent Management, ask yourself thefollowing questions: Do you like doing research and keeping up with trends? Do you have an eye for the big picture as well as the ability to manage minor details? Do you have the discipline to devise a robust design and test plan?
  • 23. Talent Manager Job Description• The educational backgrounds of Talent Management Professionals varyconsiderably, reflecting the diversity of duties and levels of responsibility.In filling entry-level jobs, many employers seek college graduates whohave majored in human resources, human resources administration, orindustrial and labor relations. Other employers look for college graduateswith a technical or business background or a well-rounded liberal artseducation.• Employment of Talent Management Professionals is expected to growfaster than the average for all occupations. College graduates who haveearned certification should have the best job opportunities.
  • 24. Talent alone cannot help, intelligence followed with value added guidance can shape up the success in making any decision right. – Choose wisely the career profile you would look forward to….
  • 25. Always Remember