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June 2014 - Session 2 - User Centered Design
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June 2014 - Session 2 - User Centered Design

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Personas, scenarios, user flows, oh my!

Personas, scenarios, user flows, oh my!

Session 2 slides from my SVC class on UX1. Learn more here: http://svc-ux1.leannagingras.com

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    June 2014 - Session 2 - User Centered Design June 2014 - Session 2 - User Centered Design Presentation Transcript

    • User-Centered Design Session 2 - June 26, 2014 School of Visual Concepts - UX1 http://svc-ux1.leannagingras.com
    • Week 1: what does “doing UX” mean? what does UX look like in the real world? how do we talk to users? Week 2: User-centered design how do we transform interview insights to design ideas? Everything below here is tentative and will be adjusted to taste! Week 3: Sketching and Prototyping how do we create and prototype good designs? Week 4: Measuring UX how do we measure UX impact and make UX actionable? Week 5: Panel - Making an impact with UX how do we make our UX work count?
    • Agenda Interviews discussion Personas Scenarios User flows Studio: designing for a persona
    • INTERVIEWS
    • Homework 1. who did you interview? 2. what was the show and tell? 3. what was the top thing you learned?
    • Who did you interview? Objective: “learn what information personal trainers and clients are sharing now” Jeff, interview at a coffeeshop. Jeff teaches crossfit classes downtown and also sees about 5 personal training clients per week. Claire and Jason, onsite interview at a gym downtown. Claire and Jason have been working together for the last 3 months, meeting every other week.
    • What was the “show and tell”? Objective: “learn what information personal trainers and clients are sharing now” Jeff brought a blank client file to the coffeeshop and showed me what information he records in it. Includes client info, client workout goals, the recommended workout regimen (this changes a little every week), his assessment of their progress. Claire and Jim: observed an on-site personal training session at the Zum gym downtown. The session was a little less than an hour.
    • What was the top thing you learned? Objective: “learn what information personal trainers and clients are sharing now” Information about a workout program has to be captured over time, and progress also has to be captured as well as problems and solutions, but nobody was using technical solutions. It was all verbal or over email.
    • What can we do with our information? Objective: “learn what information personal trainers and clients are sharing now” - Nobody currently using a targeted collab solution - all verbal / email competitive: are there already solutions on the market that are not being used? why not? - Personal trainers use individual client files, notes - trends are anecdotal / memory design: review file photos & map out what info they contain - Pain point: meticulous and difficult to track on-the-ground workout details (lifts, reps, weight) as well as program trends over time (rate of progress) group brainstorm: concepts for easy workout tracking - explore integration with gadgets eg Fuelband
    • Homework 1. who did you interview? 2. what was the show and tell? 3. what was the top thing you learned?
    • PERSONAS
    • http://www.jjg.net/elements/pdf/elements_simpleplanes.pdf
    • Squarespace’s target user here is the website’s audience: the casual browser. My users!
    • Squarespace’s target user here is the website’s administrator or content creator. ME!!!
    • Personas make great straw men throughout the design and decision-making process! ● Making sure the team is all aligned on who they’re building for ● Communicating user goals and needs ● Guiding design decisions (“would Chelsea want this feature?”) ● Surfacing different groups using your product (administrator vs. content creator)
    • Personas don’t have to be fancy to get the job done. Content ● Photo or sketch ● Quick quote ● Demographics ● Goals ● Pain points ● Motivations
    • https://uxmag.com/articles/using-proto-personas-for-executive-alignment
    • Grab ‘n Go Gus Savvy Sally
    • This section of the Rick Steves website is designed to help both armchair travelers and tour members dig into content.
    • This section of the Rick Steves website is designed to help the armchair traveler learn, relax, and hopefully get inspired!
    • This section of the Rick Steves website is designed to help the tour persona evaluate and make decisions about tours.
    • We didn’t build features around booking: they don’t fit the persona stories that well, nor the business model.
    • David, Opportunistic Fan “My wife's from Portland and I'm from Seattle. We never miss the Sounders - Timbers game!" Goals: ● Get great seats as soon as sales open ● Follow a specific rivalry ● Jump on cheap last-minute tickets Frustrations: ● Too slow to buy tickets on his phone ● Doesn't care about following the whole season ● Missed opportunities to get playoff tickets
    • David, Opportunistic Fan “My wife's from Portland and I'm from Seattle. We never miss the Sounders - Timbers game!" Goals: ● Get great seats as soon as sales open ● Follow a specific rivalry ● Jump on cheap last-minute tickets Frustrations: ● Too slow to buy tickets on his phone ● Doesn't care about following the whole season ● Missed opportunities to get playoff tickets Generalizes user groups but is specific enough to be useful!
    • David, Opportunistic Fan “My wife's from Portland and I'm from Seattle. We never miss the Sounders - Timbers game!" Goals: ● Get great seats as soon as sales open ● Follow a specific rivalry ● Jump on cheap last-minute tickets Frustrations: ● Too slow to buy tickets on his phone ● Doesn't care about following the whole season ● Missed opportunities to get playoff tickets Provides context and motivations
    • David, Opportunistic Fan “My wife's from Portland and I'm from Seattle. We never miss the Sounders - Timbers game!" Goals: ● Get great seats as soon as sales open ● Follow a specific rivalry ● Jump on cheap last-minute tickets Frustrations: ● Too slow to buy tickets on his phone ● Doesn't care about following the whole season ● Missed opportunities to get playoff tickets Clearly identifies user goals and key tasks
    • David, Opportunistic Fan “My wife's from Portland and I'm from Seattle. We never miss the Sounders - Timbers game!" Goals: ● Get great seats as soon as sales open ● Follow a specific rivalry ● Jump on cheap last-minute tickets Frustrations: ● Too slow to buy tickets on his phone ● Doesn't care about following the whole season ● Missed opportunities to get playoff tickets Calls out pain points and frustrations
    • DESIGN NARRATIVES
    • http://www.jjg.net/elements/pdf/elements_simpleplanes.pdf
    • SCENARIOS Scenarios continue where we left off with personas. They build a narrative description of a problem or a key task.
    • SCENARIOS BAD: Diana wants to book a tour BAD: As a tour member, Diana needs a “buy” button so she can pay us BAD: Diana goes to the tours landing page and then clicks the primary CTA which takes her to the tour listing page which provides her with a radio button select of tour dates blah blah blah My rule of thumb: If you were explaining it to someone on the phone, they’d be able to follow along and it would be plausible as a real story.
    • BUILDING GOOD SCENARIOS Diana is an armchair traveler who lives vicariously through her globetrotting 23- year-old son. He put some pictures from Rome on Facebook, which sparked her curiosity about the Pantheon. This turned into hours learning about ancient Rome, watching TV episodes and reading articles. She’s always been nervous about travel, but now she’s inspired and wants to book a Rick Steves tour! Describe who the persona is
    • BUILDING GOOD SCENARIOS Diana is an armchair traveler who lives vicariously through her globetrotting 23-year-old son. He put some pictures from Rome on Facebook, which sparked her curiosity about the Pantheon. This turned into hours learning about ancient Rome, watching TV episodes and reading articles. She’s always been nervous about travel, but now she’s inspired and wants to book a Rick Steves tour! Describe their context of use
    • BUILDING GOOD SCENARIOS Diana is an armchair traveler who lives vicariously through her globetrotting 23-year-old son. He put some pictures from Rome on Facebook, which sparked her curiosity about the Pantheon. This turned into hours learning about ancient Rome, watching TV episodes and reading articles. She’s always been nervous about travel, but now she’s inspired and wants to book a Rick Steves tour! Describe what happens (not how)
    • BUILDING GOOD SCENARIOS Diana is an armchair traveler who lives vicariously through her globetrotting 23-year-old son. He put some pictures from Rome on Facebook, which sparked her curiosity about the Pantheon. This turned into hours learning about ancient Rome, watching TV episodes and reading articles. She’s always been nervous about travel, but now she’s inspired and wants to book a Rick Steves tour! Describe reaching a user goal (or solving a problem)
    • SCENARIO Diana is an armchair traveler who lives vicariously through her globetrotting 23-year-old son. He put some pictures from Rome on Facebook, which sparked her curiosity about the Pantheon. This turned into hours learning about ancient Rome, watching TV episodes and reading articles. She’s always been nervous about travel, but now she’s inspired and looking at Rick Steves tours! BREAK IT DOWN Let’s whiteboard this!
    • USER FLOWS Step-by-step representation of completing a task or reaching a goal. They’re good for: ● showing where elements are are connected ● mapping out conditionality and decision points ● identifying screens to be considered in the design
    • Amazon likes to make the path to your wallet as short as possible. Adding a feature like this requires looking at the entire experience from 1000 feet up.
    • Add to cart View cart Shipping options Payment options Review order Order confirmation Select address and add to cart Use default payment Review order Order confirmation Typical e-commerce workflow Amazon’s workflow Select address and one-click it Order confirmation Amazon’s one-click workflow
    • User flow showing how librarians make purchasing decisions. This also shows contingencies and decision treeing.
    • LET’S ROLL UP OUR SLEEVES
    • User-centered design Split into groups of 2-3. You decide: Jessie or Joseph? Discuss the problem and brainstorm potential solutions. Write a scenario or two, and use it to create a workflow of the solution. Get ready to share your results with us!
    • Jessie, the Comeback Jessie used to be in great shape! But now that she works on a computer all day, she’s not as strong as she wants to be. Goals: Jessie wants to be able to do 100 pushups a day. Right now she can only do 10! Pain points: she doesn’t have time to go to the gym a lot. Motivations: She has $100 on getting to 100 pushups before Selena!
    • Joseph, the team player Joseph is part of a team competing in a Tough Mudder race in September. Goals: Set up a training regimen that accomplishes his goals before September Pain points: hard to know how close he is to his goals, hard to know how the team as a whole is doing Motivations: to WIN! and be a good asset to his team
    • Discussion Let’s share our solutions. How did the persona and problem framing affect the solution?
    • Homework Use personas, scenarios, and design narratives to brainstorm and develop design solutions. Be ready to describe the problem and solution to us! We want to see your user flow! (It’s ok if it’s rough around the edges!)