Vertical gardening 101

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Introduction to vertical gardening, specifically tailored to zone 5b gardeners at The Peterson Garden Project.

Introduction to vertical gardening, specifically tailored to zone 5b gardeners at The Peterson Garden Project.

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  • 1. Making the Most of a Small GardenVertical Urban Gardening
  • 2. The Peterson Garden Projectwww.petersongarden.orgIntersection of Peterson & Campbell
  • 3. So you don’t have a farm? You can still grow your own food!Small space gardening is all about making themost of what you have.• Anywhere you’re growing flowers, you could be growing food.• Make every inch count: plant as densely as you can, by following the grids at gardeners.com.• Think vertical.
  • 4. Leah RayMy home gardenChicago bungalow, limited space
  • 5. So you don’t have a farm? You can still grow your own food!How to make the most of your raised bed:• Create a grid of 1’ squares.• You only need 6” of soil (but remember: this means no long carrots, parsnips, etc.)• Never walk on your soil.
  • 6. The Square Foot GridPeterson Garden Project Plots
  • 7. So you don’t have a farm? You can still grow your own food!What should you plant?• What do you love to eat?• What do you buy at the Farmer’s Market?• Three basic categories: 1. SALAD 2. VEGGIES 3. PRESERVING (pickles, canning, freezing)
  • 8. So you don’t have a farm? You can still grow your own food!How much can you plant?• Not all plants produce equally• Proper spacing is crucial for square foot gardening—heed the rules!
  • 9. The Square Foot GridCorrect spacing is the key
  • 10. So you don’t have a farm? You can still grow your own food!Plant Spacing• Divide your plot into a grid of 1’ squares• Plant as many things in each square as possible• To make the most of your space, use vertical supports for plants that can grow up, like tomatoes, squash, peppers, potatoes, watermelon, etc.
  • 11. Growing Vertical You get lots more when you grow up!Growing vertically requiressupports. You must supportplants including:• Tomatoes• Tomatillos• Peppers• Peas• BeansYou can add verticals to createmore space for:• Melon• Squash (vining types)
  • 12. Growing VerticalPros and cons of support systems
  • 13. Growing VerticalYou get lots more when you grow up!
  • 14. So you don’t have a farm? You can still grow your own food!What goes where?• Now that you know what you’ll plant, and how much to plant… how do you arrange your garden?• Think about how tall things get.• Think about where the sun will cast its shadow.• Elbow room: don’t smish the giants together
  • 15. Here’s the DirtMy PGP Plot in July 2010
  • 16. My PGP Plot in 2010Some victories, some defeats
  • 17. Here’s the DirtMy PGP Plot in July 2010
  • 18. My PGP Plan for 2011Highlighting squash & okra
  • 19. The final element: time Planting at the right timeWhen do you plant?• Not all vegetables are planted at the same time.• Some need to be started from seed indoors• Some can be planted early, others can’t take August heatHow do you figure it out?• Seed packets are the final word• Leah’s OCD chart• Gardeners.com: make your garden plan there, and they generate a planting schedule for you!
  • 20. The final element: timePlanting at the right time
  • 21. May 21, 2010
  • 22. June 6, 2010
  • 23. July 12, 2010
  • 24. September 10, 2010
  • 25. Building CommunityResources on Twitter
  • 26. Building CommunityConversations on Facebook
  • 27. The Real ExpertsMy Favorite Garden Books
  • 28. The Peterson Garden ProjectWe CAN grow it!