Multimedia Portfolio Design For Students
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  • Nice presentation Leah. You should take a look at www.thePortfolium.com. Its a new social portfolio network for students of all majors.
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Multimedia Portfolio Design For Students Document Transcript

  • 1. MULTIMEDIA PORTFOLIO DESIGN FOR STUDENTS Introduction: Any multimedia student can greatly benefit from a well put together portfolio. This portfolio can aid in college entry and job placement. It can also provide a method for self reflection and performance evaluation. This curriculum will provide a means to a well organized product and provide the student with various options. Target: The target group for this curriculum is college-level multimedia and design students. These students can range from alternative to regular learners. Any student or individual can also benefit from the structure and ideas when used appropriately. Purpose: The purpose of the curriculum is a culmination of all the progressive work that was produced by the student. It should also help aid students in the area of concept and the development of that concept visually. This curriculum is thematic in that it is a large idea but will integrate concepts of several disciplines. Sources include community resources, literature, current events, abstract concepts and student interests. Design Process: This curriculum was created using and will enforce the use of a design process called ADDIE. ADDIE stands for Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement and Evaluate and it can be used for most any task. ADDIE will help the student to find a structure and process to each project produced.
  • 2. Span: This course will span 11 units. The whole course will comprise of 44 contact hours and 11 classes. 11 Lesson plans are needed for this course. The course should end in a minimum of 2 mock interviews for personal evaluation. Rationale The majority of Multimedia students today are not confronted with the reality of the importance of a portfolio until after they graduate. It is important for students to begin their portfolio development upon exiting out of high school/entry into college and to be constantly reminded of its importance. This curriculum is simply a guide that helps students find their preferable means to a portfolio. Course Resources There are many resources available to students without their knowledge. Students may want to further experiment with certain resources to diversify their portfolio. Some resources that may be helpful to students at this time may include, but are not limited to, free Adobe brushes available on the internet, free fonts available on the internet, research on pioneers in the industry, local and online printers, Virtual Libraries and community resources such as rental equipment and museums. There are many resources listed in the curriculum content areas. You will also be required to bring in members of the faculty and staff as well as a panel of professionals Units 9 and 11.
  • 3. Table of Contents Instructor Guide (Not included directly but found in various locations) Instructor Resources Instructor Notes Classroom and Lab Setup Unit 1: An Introduction to the Multimedia Portfolio Objectives References Methodology Teaching Tips Suggested Activities, Assignments & Deliverables Summary Graded Assignments Rubric ITSE NETS Standards Addresses Unit 2: The Multimedia Portfolio Process Objectives References Methodology Teaching Tips Suggested Activities, Assignments & Deliverables Summary Graded Assignments Rubric ITSE NETS Standards Addresses Unit 3: The Product Overview Objectives References Methodology Teaching Tips Suggested Activities, Assignments & Deliverables Summary Graded Assignments Rubric ITSE NETS Standards Addresses Unit 4: Stage Analyze Objectives References Methodology
  • 4. Teaching Tips Suggested Activities, Assignments & Deliverables Summary Graded Assignments Rubric ITSE NETS Standards Addresses Unit 5: Stage Design Objectives References Methodology Teaching Tips Suggested Activities, Assignments & Deliverables Summary Graded Assignments Rubric ITSE NETS Standards Addresses Unit 6: Stage Develop I Objectives References Methodology Teaching Tips Suggested Activities, Assignments & Deliverables Summary Graded Assignments Rubric ITSE NETS Standards Addresses Unit 7: Stage Develop II Objectives References Methodology Teaching Tips Suggested Activities, Assignments & Deliverables Summary Graded Assignments Rubric ITSE NETS Standards Addresses Unit 8: Stage Develop III Objectives References Methodology
  • 5. Teaching Tips Suggested Activities, Assignments & Deliverables Summary Graded Assignments Rubric ITSE NETS Standards Addresses Unit 9: Stage Implement Objectives References Methodology Teaching Tips Suggested Activities, Assignments & Deliverables Summary Graded Assignments Rubric ITSE NETS Standards Addresses Unit 10: Stage Evaluate Objectives References Methodology Teaching Tips Suggested Activities, Assignments & Deliverables Summary Graded Assignments Rubric ITSE NETS Standards Addresses Unit 11: The Portfolio Presentation Objectives References Methodology Teaching Tips Suggested Activities, Assignments & Deliverables Summary Graded Assignments Rubric ITSE NETS Standards Addresses
  • 6. Course Outline Unit Lesson Title Homework Activities 1 An Introduction Students are to select Introduction to the to the their best works and Multimedia Portfolio Design Multimedia bring in to the next course Portfolio class. Discuss the wide range of portfolios. Brainstorm student work. Conduct self-assessment of knowledge, skills and abilities. Lab 1.1. Critique of an E- portfolio. Activity 3.1 Individual Brainstorm Worksheet Lab 4.2 Self-Branding Worksheet 2 The Multimedia Students are to Welcome to Brand You Portfolio Process finalize and digitize The Portfolio- A Tool for work for use in the Effective Job Search Multimedia Portfolio. Targeting Your Portfolio Conduct self-assessment of knowledge, skills and abilities. Organizing and arranging work Brief Design Recap I Your Career History Worksheet Targeting Your Portfolio Worksheet Project Part I: List of Components 3 The Product Students should Conducting a Career Search. Overview finalize their Resume, Coming up with a Self- due next week, and Marketing Strategy. Project 1, due Unit 5. Discuss Portfolio Diversity Activity 3.2 Your Professional Network Log Handout 4.1 The Digital Portfolio Process
  • 7. 4 Stage Analyze Students should Analyze the Portfolio finalize Project 1, due Determine the Portfolio next week and the Structure. Table of Contents. Instructor Conferences with Students Reviewing and using ADDIE in this course Worksheet 2.3: Stage Analyze Handout 3.3: Different Types of Portfolios 5 Stage Design Complete storyboards. Review Stage Design Design Recap II Building Components Assign Project II Handout 3.1 Gestalt Activity 4.2 Creating Your Identity Activity 4.4 Create a Design Sheet Course Project Part II: Assembling the Portfolio 6 Stage Develop I Complete the Discuss Developing the portfolio template for Portfolio review next week. Utilize the Design Sheet Worksheet 3.0: Starting Up your Portfolio 7 Stage Develop II Continue to work on Continue to Develop the and add to their Portfolio portfolio. Print a few Activity2.5 Portfolio Formative business cards for the Evaluation Rubric interviews. 8 Stage Develop III Finalize your Portfolio, Finish Your Portfolio choose their outfit and Activity2.5 Portfolio Formative prepare to present Evaluation Rubric their projects next week. 9 Stage Implement Revise your Portfolio Presenting Your Portfolio based on suggestions Peer and Instructor Feedback made today. Assign Project 3 Activity 2.2 Individual Growth
  • 8. Activity Course Project III: Final Presentation of the Multimedia Portfolio 10 Stage Evaluate Choose a professional Instructor/Student outfit, prepare for the Conferences final presentation. Instructor Feedback Student provides areas of growth The Final Evaluation Getting a Winning Job 11 The Portfolio n/a The Final Presentation Presentation Essential Questions The following questions relate to the learning expectations for the student and the teaching expectations for the instructor. 1. Will the student create a portfolio that is easy to update? 2. Will the portfolio effectively present multimedia content? 3. Will the portfolio provide easy access to all those who will view it? 4. Will the portfolio have a professional, attractive design? 5. Will the portfolio include various materials that enhance the student’s marketability? 6. Will all the materials associated with the portfolio coordinate and have correct spelling and grammar? 7. Will everything in the portfolio be clearly labeled? 8. Will the student be able to come up with and initiate a marketing plan for their portfolio?
  • 9. 9. Will the student have a plan for updating their portfolio in the future? 10. Will they have the knowledge to explore and evaluate the idea of continuing their education? Needs Assessments Assessment questionnaire 1 should be administered to the students the first day of class. Assessment questionnaires 2 and 3 should be administered at the class completion. Both questionnaires should affect and be affected by the curriculum updates. There is a supplemental Needs Assessment, 4, that was also developed to form this curriculum. The answers from that Needs Assessment have been provided. It may want to be referenced and re-administered for updates.
  • 10. 1. Student Questionnaire Name: Date: 1. Circle any items that you would like to include in your portfolio: Documents: Diplomas Awards Certifications Letters of Recommendation Fine Art: Hand Drawings Paintings Sculptures Electronic Art: Realistic Photoshop Art Realistic Illustrator Art Graphic Design: Identity Product/Package Design Animation: 3D Modeling Animation Web Design: Web Site Design Web Development A/V: Film Shorts Broadcast Graphics List Other: 2. Circle your target audience: Employers Future Education List Other: 3. Circle your desired type of electronic portfolio: Website AutoPlay DVD Interactive DVD
  • 11. 2. Student Questionnaire Name: Date: 1. Did you find the lessons easy to understand? 2. Do you find that you benefited from the curriculum in some way and if so how? 3. Are you now more able to think of ways to create an easy to update portfolio or project? 4. Did you have easy access to the resources you felt you needed? If not, what was missing? 5. Do you feel that there was an area that should have been addressed or more emphasized? If so, what was it? 6. Do you feel you were introduced to enough sample portfolios and did you find them helpful? 7. Did you feel this class provided a reasonable time limit and schedule for the construction of your portfolio? If no, what do you feel could have been different? 8. Do you feel there needs to be more communication in this class? If so, between whom? 9. Did you feel you got enough feedback from your instructor and your peers? 10. Did you plan or talk about planning an effective marketing plan for your portfolio? Please state any other additional comments:
  • 12. 3. Instructor Questionnaire Name: Date: 1. Did you find the lessons easy to teach? 2. Do you find that the students benefited from the curriculum in some way and if so how? 3. Do you feel the students made progress in being able to think of ways to create an easy to update portfolio or project? 4. Did you have easy access to the resources you felt you need? If not, what was missing? 5. Do you feel that there was an area that should have been addressed that was not in the curriculum? If so, what was it? 6. Do you feel the students responded well to the lessons? If not, what lessons did they not find appealing? 7. Did you feel this class provided a reasonable time limit and schedule for the construction of the portfolios? If no, what do you feel could have been different? 8. Do you feel there needs to be more interaction between students? If so, what do you suggest? 9. Did you feel most students achieved their goals? 10. Were the students able to come up with some effective ways to market their portfolios? If not, how do you think we could have aided them further? Please state any other additional comments:
  • 13. 4. Needs Assessment for Multimedia Portfolio Design for Students (Please take the time to answer this questionnaire. Your own interpretation of the questions is encouraged.) Name:______________________________________________ Title:_______________________________________________ 1. Your validation (relation to Multimedia or Portfolios): 2. What elements do you feel should be included in a Multimedia Portfolio? 3. What do you feel employers are looking for in a Multimedia Portfolio? 4. How do you feel Multimedia Portfolios should be presented? 5. General comments, concerns or feelings towards students creating a Multimedia Portfolios:
  • 14. Results Name: Jason Bock Title: LASERTRON 1. Your validation (relation to Multimedia or Portfolios): Former ad director, art director, currently in charge of marketing and occasional buyer of multimedia 2. What elements do you feel should be included in a Multimedia Portfolio? Individual projects of merit, software used, graphic design elements 3. What do you feel employers are looking for in a Multimedia Portfolio? A personal sense of style, command of software and quality work 4. How do you feel Multimedia Portfolios should be presented? Best served personally, but since that is not possible, I favor web over DVD/CDs 5. General comments, concerns or feelings towards students creating a Multimedia Portfolios: --Keep it updated, continue working (if possible) after classes --Be prepared to specifically describe how you generated effects/work...the world is full of people who borrow other people's works. --A small, complete project is much better than an almost finished project --All elements will be reviewed as a part of human nature...if your skill is graphics and you include sound in an animation...you better be able to do quality sound work and the sound better be good. Multi-media IS multi-media after all. Scripting, writing, editing and directing will all play a huge role in multi-media...not just the graphics.
  • 15. Name: Aimee Murch Title: (Financial Aid Admin at ITT Tech in Getzville, NY) 1. Your validation (relation to Multimedia or Portfolios): My exposure to Multimedia Portfolios occurs very early in the student’s school entrance process. As an extension to the admissions process, I familiarize myself with the program elements. In this way I am able to share these elements with new, prospective students. The Multimedia Portfolio is a showcase for the student’s accomplishments and a source of pride for ITT Technical Institute. 2. What elements do you feel should be included in a Multimedia Portfolio? The Multimedia Portfolio should feature work the student is most proud of. This work doesn’t have to be limited to pieces that earned the highest grades, but should include inspirational, thought provoking, and conversation inducing works, as well. 3. What do you feel employers are looking for in a Multimedia Portfolio? Employers are looking for styles to compliment the structure already in place within their organization. 4. How do you feel Multimedia Portfolios should be presented? The Portfolio should be a place for the student to highlight their creativity. The portfolio should not be limited to a simple carrying case, but should include some Internet accessible options, as well. 5. General comments, concerns or feelings towards students creating a Multimedia Portfolios: The Multimedia Portfolio is a culmination of the student’s work. The student should be familiar with the need for a Portfolio as early in their college curriculum as possible. Feedback in a constructive format from peers and students should be encouraged to give the student an idea about how their work will be perceived by others, including future, would-be employers.
  • 16. Name: Joey Buczek Title: Photographer/Visual Artist 1. Your validation (relation to Multimedia or Portfolios): I work extensively with portfolio-building and creation. 2. What elements do you feel should be included in a Multimedia Portfolio? All the strong points of the artist. 3. What do you feel employers are looking for in a Multimedia Portfolio? Diversity and consistency in the prospective artist. Diversity when it comes to the various areas that the artist excels at, but consistency in each individual project's scope and design. Also, the artist should display only their best and/or latest works. 4. How do you feel Multimedia Portfolios should be presented? In the format that they were created. For example, if the portfolio is mostly video work, then snapshots of the videos aren't enough; it should be the video itself or various clips of it if the length is an issue time-wise. The portfolio should also be clean and neat/sharp. Do not go overboard with extra trimmings and fancy typeface or graphics if they are not part of the artwork. Remember, your portfolio is not a piece of art itself, it is a professional presentation OF your artwork. 5. General comments, concerns or feelings towards students creating a Multimedia Portfolios: Always show your best/latest works. If you have something kicking around from a few years back that you like but don't feel is your best, don't include it. Don't use sub-par work as "filler". ever. Even if you only have three best works, just show those. Other work can be viewed upon request if necessary.
  • 17. Name: Kelly L. Leeper Title: Student 1. Your validation (relation to Multimedia or Portfolios): Multimedia Student 2. What elements do you feel should be included in a Multimedia Portfolio? Environmental Design, Graphic Design, Print Design, Web Design, 3D Modeling and Rigging, and Instructional Design. 3. What do you feel employers are looking for in a Multimedia Portfolio? Creativity, User Friendly, Different styles abstract, contemporary, and typography. 4. How do you feel Multimedia Portfolios should be presented? Digitally and Cased and Online. 5. General comments, concerns or feelings towards students creating a Multimedia Portfolios: I don’t know. PLEASE HELP MEEEEEE. MAKE A GREAT ONE!!!
  • 18. Name: Tim Herzog Title: President Flying Bison Brewing Company 1. Your validation (relation to Multimedia or Portfolios): Job applicants for design or website positions usually bring multi media to show the breadth of their work. 2. What elements do you feel should be included in a Multimedia Portfolio? For our needs, web experience is a must. A disc containing web design, or computer graphics that could be uploaded to website is helpful. Also some demonstration of advanced print (label, carrier, billboard) applications helps. 3. What do you feel employers are looking for in a Multimedia Portfolio? Solid understanding of the basics of design as well as ability to use latest technology to achieve results. 4. How do you feel Multimedia Portfolios should be presented? Generally a disc that contains the electronically generated pieces, and a standard 2D presentation of print designs will show me the capabilities of each applicant. 5. General comments, concerns or feelings towards students creating a Multimedia Portfolios: If I have to assist in setting up presentation, it’s over. The presenter had better be more computer literate than I am, or they are not going to help me advance. The presentation should not look or feel like a video game. Only the creative director at a video game company wants to see that.
  • 19. Name:___Mark A. Onesi___ Title:__Dean of Academic Affairs (ITT Tech Getzville, NY) 1. Your validation (relation to Multimedia or Portfolios): Have taught non-multimedia portfolio classes in the past 2. What elements do you feel should be included in a Multimedia Portfolio? Evidence of creativity and knowledge of the multimedia field. But, the included elements should be tasteful and geared towards the needs of an employer, not just games or the likes of the student themselves. 3. What do you feel employers are looking for in a Multimedia Portfolio? Evidence that the prospective employee can do things that the employer needs. They are looking for breadth of abilities. Limiting the portfolio only to the elements most liked by the student doesn’t show flexibility and/or in-depth knowledge of the field. 4. How do you feel Multimedia Portfolios should be presented? On video or disk. Hard copy is a back-up, but the bulk of employers would like to see the automated version. 5. General comments, concerns or feelings towards students creating a Multimedia Portfolios: Too often, multimedia students are focused on one area of the field. They enjoy a certain type of multimedia course and they excel in that area. But, they fail to see the need for a more well-rounded presentation of their skills and abilities. Most employers are looking for employees who can fill their needs and be flexible enough to branch out into additional areas of the field. This flexibility and well-rounded ability should be displayed.
  • 20. Name:__Kristan Lambert Title:_Career Services Specialist (ITT Tech Getzville, NY) 1. Your validation (relation to Multimedia or Portfolios): I assist the students with gaining employment in their field once they graduate from the school, their portfolios are a very important aspect of their job search and thus I deem Multimedia Portfolios very necessary. 2. What elements do you feel should be included in a Multimedia Portfolio? Hand drawings, advertising aspects, logo, company website, etc. a product concept and design, 3D modeling examples, animation examples, utilization of photoshop and illustrator, html experience, css and dreamweaver as well, a final project and also their resume- prefer to see a creative watermarked resume. 3. What do you feel employers are looking for in a Multimedia Portfolio? Diversity and flexibility, skills and the usage of those skills and how those skills are essentially being “sold” 4. How do you feel Multimedia Portfolios should be presented? Website or CD, but would prefer a website 5. General comments, concerns or feelings towards students creating a Multimedia Portfolios: I think it should be a mandatory effort by all Multimedia students, it is to assist them in their professional future and should be considered as that when creating it.
  • 21. Name: Christopher Martone Title: Multimedia Student 1. Your validation (relation to Multimedia or Portfolios): ITT Tech Multimedia Student 2. What elements do you feel should be included in a Multimedia Portfolio? Past works including websites, 3D renders, brochures, pamphlets, drawings etc. 3. What do you feel employers are looking for in a Multimedia Portfolio? All of the above. Well designed products, and product suites that show you are capable of good quality work and that shows you are right for the job 4. How do you feel Multimedia Portfolios should be presented? CD preferably a CD-RW so that you can constantly update it. Of course some tangible works should also be included in a folder. 5. General comments, concerns or feelings towards students creating a Multimedia Portfolios: It should tie in with your resume and should carry on any images or styling from it.
  • 22. Name: Jonathan Bauer Title: Multimedia student (graphic designer) 1. Your validation (relation to Multimedia or Portfolios): I am a 7th quarter multimedia student that is carrying a 4.0 GPA, I have done photo editing work outside of school and also ad design at my current job. 2. What elements do you feel should be included in a Multimedia Portfolio? A digital portfolio of your work, free hand drawings and computer generated samples. These samples should be put into the digital portfolio and also a snapshot of the images of the computer work should be put into the hard copy of the portfolio. 3. What do you feel employers are looking for in a Multimedia Portfolio? They want to see a solid understanding of the programs and the talent of the person submitting it has. The way the portfolio is laid out will also show the organization and project management. 4. How do you feel Multimedia Portfolios should be presented? I believe a person should be ready to present it in one of two ways. The first should be done in hard format where all of the samples are in a leather type bounded portfolio so the employer can flip themselves. A second one should be done on a CD or as a website so an employer can look it up at anytime. 5. General comments, concerns or feelings towards students creating a Multimedia Portfolios: An organized portfolio is a must and also the preparation of and little details are what will set it apart. The portfolio needs to be diverse and span all of your different talents. For multimedia students we need to make more steps than other industry portfolios because I feel multimedia students are judged more on a visual portfolio than what is written.
  • 23. Personal Educational Philosophy Based on Education for Adult and Alternative Learners in Multimedia Programs Leah Sciabarrasi Purpose of Education I am currently going for a Masters in Educational Computing. I graduated with a BFA from the University at Buffalo. My concentration was in Photography. At the time, I was unsure in pursuing my education any further because I didn’t feel a Masters in Fine Art would aid me in any great way. I formed my own business and continued to get seasonal or odd jobs to make up for a consistent income. I took an interest in everything multimedia, but I could never find the right job that would allow me to utilize all my knowledge and skills. I then got an opportunity of a lifetime, teaching at a local Institute in the Multimedia and CAD departments. This position allowed me to share my knowledge with the faculty and students and also allowed me to progress in my comprehension of various programs. I realized that since this was something I wanted to do, I would have to continue my education in order to move on to the University level. After scouting different programs at various local schools, I decided on Buffalo State’s Educational Computing program. Personal Beliefs and Reflections Concerning Education “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” Nelson Mandela
  • 24. 1. Education should always be relevant to one’s life and should always aid to their present or future in some way. 2. Education should reach all the senses. 3. Education is different for each individual. The different path each student takes should be recognized and celebrated. 4. It should always be considered that each individual has different talents and abilities and within reason they should perhaps be graded within their own abilities. 5. Academic success should be recognized and celebrated. 6. Each student should be treated equally and recognized individually. Everyone has the right to pursue being successful. 7. Everyone should work together to promote environment and universe awareness. 8. Each person is responsible for themselves and how their actions affect others and themselves. 9. A desire for knowledge and the awareness of this desire directly affects one’s life. If a student has not realized or does not have this desire, it can not be forced upon them. 10. It is the job of the student to react to the instruction and it is the role of the educator to always be persistent in their instruction. 11. Eye contact makes everyone feel like a human being. 12. Communication should happen freely among all parties. 13. Success breeds success and it becomes addictive. 14. Knowledge of geography, current events, spelling and grammar are crucial. Reading helps the knowledge of all four and more.
  • 25. 15. Technology should be integrated but never overused. 16. The classroom is full of students. It is up to the educator to identify each individual. 17. Time must be spent outside of class researching, meeting with and reaching out to each student. 18. Instructors should always have a hand out. It is up to the student to reach back. 19. Students should develop an appreciation and awareness for social skills in and out of the classroom. 20. Students should develop a global awareness of all the events and happenings of our world. Learning Environment and Learning Process 1. Student participation is interactive. 2. Students learn through their own exploration. 3. Assessment is based on student’s performances of tasks that cover the objectives. 4. Fair and consistent school and behavior policies should always be maintained. 5. Create a positive learning environment for questions and feedback. Students’ Role in Education 1. Students are expected to act appropriately, respectfully and come to class ready to learn. 2. Students have the responsibility to behave in a way that does not disrupt the learning or instruction process.
  • 26. 3. Students are expected to willingly participate. 4. Students are expected to come to class on time and prepared. 5. Students are expected to pay attention at all times. 6. Students are to always avoid disruptive behavior during class time (cell phones, talking, noise, tardiness, etc.) Teaching Methods and Classroom Organization 1. There should be a consistent underlining structure to each class day so that students know what to expect. 2. Instructors should teach a well put together lesson in a cohesive manner. 3. Various learning procedures are encouraged and include demonstrations, brainstorming, group activities, group discussions, handouts, field trips and guest speakers facilitated by the instructor. 4. It is up to the instructor to demonstrate the daily lesson for the students. 5. It is up to the student to make sure that they are on task. 6. The instructor should attempt to reach every student by the end of the class day. Educational School of Thought I believe a simplified Bloom’s Taxonomy is the most effective in learning for Multimedia Students. Knowledge: Knowledge defines the actual instruction of the material usually through means of lecture or guided interpretation by the instructor. The instruction should touch
  • 27. base on the facts (who, what, where, when, how) and should cover not only the basics, but the needed details to help students retain the information. The student’s role in knowledge is to take notes and gather the information. Comprehension: Comprehension defines understanding the information. Various means of interpretation and translation should be conducted by the instructor. The means may include but are not limited to discussions and demonstrations. The student’s role in comprehension is to understand and interpret the information. Application: Application describes the use of the information. The instructor should facilitate an assignment that allows the student to apply their knowledge learned such as a lab assignment, group activity or handout. The student’s role in application is participation. Analysis: Analysis describes being able to identify the components. The instructor should reach out to each student and review their work done in class. The student’s role in Analysis is to analyze the work they produced and identify where they applied the knowledge in the day’s lesson. Synthesis: Synthesis describes drawing conclusions and ideas on one’s own. The instructor should assign a vague homework assignment that allows the students to connect the dots between assignment and final project. The student’s role in synthesis is to formulate a project of one’s own based on the knowledge of the day’s lesson. Evaluation: Evaluation is assessing the project developed during synthesis. The instructor should grade the project developed during the synthesis phase based on the objectives
  • 28. taught for the day providing feedback. The student’s role in Evaluation is to understand the critique. Lifelong Learning “Who dares to teach must never cease to learn." John Cotton Dana I believe it is up to every educator to continue their education in their particular area of study as a way to further relate to the students and better prepare them for employment. I believe it is up to every student to understand the idea of lifelong learning in their particular chosen field and to identify updated resources. My education is not only continued by further schooling but also through various online and offline resources such as books, tutorials and lectures. Self Realization My knowledge of my true self began a long time ago and is still continuing today. I believe self evaluation is the most human thing a person can do and it should never stop. I have not only realized the person I am, but the person I want to be. My goals include always continuing to further my education, to help others at all costs and to try my hardest to do my best at any task. Career Goals I have never thought of myself as a ‘teacher’ though I have always loved the instruction
  • 29. process and the feeling I get when someone thanks me for teaching them something. I don’t think I am the best at technology, and I don’t believe the best in technology can be an educator. I take pride in finding a happy medium to the two and continuing to explore and understand that there will always be someone that I can learn from. My career goals include exploring different avenues of education, advancing the worldly concept of preparation for employment for multimedia students and helping to progress the concept of the multimedia art and career portfolios. Basic Objectives Needed To Be Met Before Entrance Into Society "Education's purpose is to replace an empty mind with an open one." -- Malcolm Forbes - 1. Goals for oneself 2. An understanding and performance of acceptable and respectable behavior including social skills 3. A desire to continue their education and better themselves 4. Basic reading, writing and grammar use 5. Completion and understanding of the objectives met during education Some of these views were borrowed from: Vestavia Hills Elementary East Educational Beliefs http://www.vestavia.k12.al.us/east/old_9_17/Educational%20Beliefs.htm 2008 Barry J http://home.att.net/~barryj/Educational_Beliefs.htm 2008 The Educational Beliefs of Dr. Michael Mitchell http://www.angelfire.com/mo/drmtch/Number5.html 2008
  • 30. Engaging Learning Environments http://www.ncrel.org/engauge/framewk/efp/environ/efpenvin.htm 2008 Stephen Gareau’s EDC601Syllabus Our Mission Statement The ITT Technical Institute is an institution of higher learning that is committed to offering quality undergraduate and continuing education locally, nationally and worldwide to students of diverse backgrounds, interests and abilities. The institution offers educational programs that integrate life-long learning with knowledge and skills to help students: ○ pursue their personal interests and objectives; ○ develop intellectual, analytical and critical thinking abilities; and ○ provide service to their communities. The programs employ traditional, applied and adult-learning pedagogies and are delivered through traditional, accelerated and distance methodologies in a learner-centered environment of mutual respect.
  • 31. General Goals for Student and Teachers Goals for Students: 1. Analyze the portfolio ideas and present work creatively. 2. Analyze the deficiencies and needs for improvement. 3. Design an effective portfolio to fit to one’s needs and showcase one’s work. 4. Develop a portfolio that will appeal to one’s potential audience. 5. Implement one’s portfolio in mock interviews and a class presentation. 5. Evaluate one’s portfolio. Goals for Teachers 1. Present material using a variety of techniques and concepts. 2. Prepare students for presenting their portfolio. 3. Make students active participants in portfolio development. 4. Create lessons that involve storytelling and advice based on an instructor’s knowledge, guest speakers and student involvement. 5. Encourage self-awareness and self-analysis.
  • 32. Instructional Materials Not Found on Lesson Plans Teaching Strategies 1. Think about implementing mentors for each team arranged. This person can be a faculty member from the department, an employer recruited by career services or a member of the career services department. The mentor can help develop student progress outside of class. 2. The instructor should work closely with the Director of Career Services to help students develop the techniques and tools required to implement their specific strategies. Evaluation and Grading 1. Attendance and Participation Regular attendance and participation are essential for satisfactory progress in this course. 2. Completed Assignments Each student is responsible for participating in team assignments and for completing delegated tasks. Each of the ream members must honestly evaluate the contributions by all the members of their respective teams.
  • 33. Evaluation Criteria Table The final grade will be based on the following weighted categories: Categories Weights Participation 15% Writing 20% Assignments Project 45% Exercises 20% Total 100%
  • 34. International Society for Technology Education National Education Technology Standards for Students 1. Creativity and Innovation Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. Students: a. apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes. b. create original works as a means of personal or group expression. c. use models and simulations to explore complex systems and issues. d. identify trends and forecast possibilities. 2. Communication and Collaboration Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. Students: a. interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a variety of digital environments and media. b. communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats. c. develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures. d. contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems. 3. Research and Information Fluency Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information. Students: a. plan strategies to guide inquiry. b. locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media. c. evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks. d. process data and report results. 4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources. Students: a. identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation. b. plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project. c. collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions. d. use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions. 5. Digital Citizenship Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior. Students: a. advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.
  • 35. b. exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning, and productivity. c. demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning. d. exhibit leadership for digital citizenship. 6. Technology Operations and Concepts Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations. Students: a. understand and use technology systems. b. select and use applications effectively and productively. c. troubleshoot systems and applications. d. transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies. Lesson Plan Outline Unit CONCEPT OBJECTIVES REFERENCES METHODOLOGY Unit Resources for this Unit Activity Type of Resource Resource KEY CONCEPTS TO BE COVERED IN CLASS TEACHING TIPS FOR THIS UNIT
  • 36. SUGGESTED ACTIVITES, ASSIGNMENTS & DELIVERABLES GRADED ASSIGNMENTS SUMMARY RUBRIC FOR GRADING STUDENTS Unit 1 Participation: Attendance Exercise: Writing Assignment: and Participation 1/4 2/4 3/4 4/4 ITSE STANDARDS ADDRESSED HOMEWORK
  • 37. Introduction: Multimedia Portfolio Design for Students Introduction: Welcome to Multimedia Portfolio Design for Students. This is one of the most important classes you will take. It will help your develop your portfolio, a reflection of your hard work and dedication to your profession. It will continue to serve you throughout your career. Class and Lab Rules: Clean up after yourself in the lab. Save your work in multiple locations. Respect the people around you. Bring head phones and use them for audio in the labs. No cell phones or cell use is permitted. No eating or drinking in the labs. Practice good work ethic at all times. Homework is mandatory regardless of attendance. Attendance is very important in this class. Grading and evaluation is based upon Labs, Homework, Effort, Attendance, Participation and your Final Portfolio. Plagiarism is never acceptable. Supplies Needed: One flash or external hard drive A large body of work containing various mediums Internet Use Policy: Students are required to follow all lab rules and should only use the internet for school- related search purposes. Let’s get started!
  • 38. Unit 1: An Introduction to the Multimedia Portfolio CONCEPT There are many different types of portfolios. This unit is intended to teach the students about these different types and what each is used for. This is also an introduction to the student’s Multimedia Portfolio and clarifying their true goals. OBJECTIVES 1. Class Overview 1.1. Schedule 2. Discuss the wide range of portfolios. 2.1. Distinguish the difference between career and ‘art’ portfolios. 2.2. Identify the characteristics of electronic and hardcopy portfolios. 2.3. Compare various sample portfolios. 2.4. Categorize the content in portfolios. 2.5. Indentify the audience and purpose. 3. Brainstorm works that a student may possibly want to include. 4. Conduct self-assessment of knowledge, skills and abilities. 4.1 Prepare a list of own skills and talents using self-assessment exercises from the ITT Tech Virtual Library. 4.2 Based on the synthesis of self- assessment and current employment opportunities create a self-marketing profile and plan. 4.3 Develop an effective and efficient networking strategy. REFERENCES ○ITT Tech Virtual Library>Reference Resources>Job Listings ○ITT Tech Virtual Library>Reference Resources>Career ○ITT Tech Virtual Library>Program Links>General Education/Technical Basics>Link Library>TB332 Professional Procedures and Portfolio Development >Self-Assessment >Marketing Tools and Strategies ○ITT Tech Virtual Library>Program Links>Multimedia>Recommended Links ○ITT Tech Virtual Library>Program Links>Multimedia>Professional Organizations
  • 39. Also encourage them to explore the electronic books available. To enable them, discuss key words that should be used. METHODOLOGY Unit 1: An Introduction to the Multimedia Portfolio Resources for this Unit Activity Type of Resource Resource 1.1 Worksheet Lab 1.1. Critique of an E-portfolio. 3.1 Worksheet Activity 3.1 Individual Brainstorm Worksheet 4.2 Worksheet Lab 4.2 Self-Branding Worksheet KEY CONCEPTS TO BE COVERED IN CLASS A. Introduction to the Multimedia Portfolio Design course B. Discuss the wide range of portfolios. C. Brainstorm student work. D. Conduct self-assessment of knowledge, skills and abilities. TEACHING TIPS FOR THIS UNIT The teaching tips are provided for your reference. Please choose carefully according to your teaching style. 1. Consider showing students many examples of electronic portfolios. Review the following websites for examples of e-portfolios. Felix Sockwell Inc. http://www.felixsockwell.com/ Patricio Sarzosa http://www.psarzosa.com/ 2. Portfolios produced are often generated with a certain audience in mind, who they are and how they can be reached. On the whiteboard, list two similar artists, designers or companies such as Hewlett Packard and Apple. Ask the students to list attributes associated with the customers who would purchase either of these two brands and the target market they feel the advertising campaigns are geared towards. Discuss how a student would want to tailor their portfolio to communicate directly to a certain audience. 3. The design process in marketing and visual communication is not limited to logo or product design. This process involves analyzation, design, development and evaluation. Divide the class into small groups of three or four and have each one pick a popular clothing company. The students should write down a list of adjectives that describe the company. Ask the students to sketch a series of new company logos in black and white only. They should strive to make the new logos emblematic of the adjectives they came up
  • 40. with. They should now analyze and select a logo to present to the class. 4. Critique is also an integral part of the design and development process. Throughout this course as well as other student courses within the Multimedia program and their Multimedia career, critique will be utilized to reinforce good composition or make suggestions for improvement. Students should be instructed not to use phrases that begin with “I like…” or “I do not like…” and replace them with statements that begin with terms like “The repetition of form leads to…” and “The first form we notice is…” Information on properly critiquing can be found at http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/content/3338/. 5. Team work is also highly encouraged. You may want to implement “Teams” and start each class out with a team building activity. This allows the students to get to know each other better and have individuals to turn to for small critiques and formative evaluations. 6. Panel discussion with Career Services, Department Chairs, The Dean, The Director, Financial Aid and other helpful personnel. The personnel should introduce themselves and advise students to reply on the Department as an effective resource to obtain employment. Also there is an introduction to the ITT Tech Career Bank and other resources that would be helpful to the students in the job search. Panel members may want to share their stories and past experiences. Everyone should try to offer their expertise in effective Multimedia portfolios in the professional environment. 7. You may want to think of starting each class day off with a team building or ice breaker activity. Visit http://www.group-games.com/ for examples. 8. Self-marketing and Self-branding are two concepts today that are often used in conjunction with portfolio development and job searching. They are especially huge issues with multimedia professionals and students. It is very important to touch base on how these topics relate to multimedia students that will soon be entry level professionals. Students should be encouraged to begin self-branding as a means to capture an employer’s attention. It should also be discussed that one should have a self-marketing plan, even if a small one. They should know where to job shop and should be encouraged to expand their horizons. i.e. They may want a graphic design position, but they may want to also include Instructional Designer in their search. For more information about the topics, please visit http://www.lealea.net/blog/comments/the-art-of-self-branding-part-one/. 9. The topic of networking should be brought up. Effective networking techniques such as business cards, clubs, events and community organizations should be discussed. Chances are many students in the class will have a story to share at this point and these stories should be encouraged. Internships are also a great way to network and get your name out there. You may want to have career services mention the available Multimedia Internships or bring in internship opportunities offered on the Career Bank or on websites such as http://www.elance.com or http://www.craigslist.com.
  • 41. SUGGESTED ACTIVITES, ASSIGNMENTS & DELIVERABLES Lab 1.1. Critique of an E-portfolio. Students should fill out the worksheet that accompanies this activity. This can be done as a group activity or an individual activity. Afterward, there should be a discussion about their results. You may want to have each group or individual present their results. Time: 1 hour Activity 3.1 Individual Brainstorm Worksheet Have students fill in the worksheet and detail each work they might like to include. This will aid them in choosing pieces for next week as well as focus on a particular audience. It will also help them to realize the areas in which they are lacking. You may want to go over the different categories with them and provide examples of each category. Time: ½ hour Lab 4.2 Self-Branding Worksheet This lab should take place after a discussion on self-assessment, self-branding and self- marketing. Students should fill out the Self-Branding Worksheet to help them get a clear, exact perspective of who they are and think of a self-marketing plan for the future. Students then should put their answers into a self-reflective 2 page essay about themselves. They should gear it towards an employer and cover all of the topics brought up in the Self- branding worksheet and Self-marketing Plan. Time: 1 hour GRADED ASSIGNMENTS Lab 3.1 Individual Brainstorm Worksheet Lab 4.2 Self-assessment and Self-marketing Plan Writing Assignment SUMMARY The unit’s lesson can be wrapped up at the end of class. Students should also be reminded of their homework. RUBRIC FOR GRADING STUDENTS Unit 1 Participation: Attendance Exercise: Critique of an Writing Assignment: Self- and Participation E-Portfolio Branding Worksheet 1/4 Extremely tardy or left early, Did not do the worksheet Did not do the worksheet Barely any participation, and no feedback during or the essay Lacked any attention discussion 2/4 Less than timely attendance Worksheet half Worksheet half completed to and from class, General completed and provided and half completed essay participation with all some feedback during with poor spelling and
  • 42. activities and interaction with discussion grammar. Essay has little other students (did what they focus and drive. had to do to get the job done, no extra effort), Lacked full attention 3/4 Generally timely attendance Worksheet mostly or fully Worksheet mostly to and from class, Average completed and provided completed and a mostly participation with all some feedback during complete essay with good activities and interaction with discussion spelling and grammar. other students, full attention Essay had some focus and for the most part drive. 4/4 Timely attendance to and Worksheet thoroughly Worksheet fully complete from class, Full participation completed and provided a and fully complete essay with all activities and lot of good, constructive with excellent spelling and interaction with other feedback during grammar. Essay was fully students, full attention discussion thought out and had a good concept. ITSE STANDARDS ADDRESSED 2. Communication and Collaboration 3. Research and Information Fluency 4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making HOMEWORK Students are to select their best works and bring in to the next class.
  • 43. Unit 1: Lab 1.1 Self-Evaluate
  • 44. Unit 1: Activity 3.1 Individual Brainstorm Worksheet Concept: You will now brainstorm works that you would like to include in your portfolio. This will help your form your portfolio later on. Tasks: 1. Question: What are the top five pieces of evidence that you would use to help demonstrate, describe, represent who you are? Why did you select those five as representative? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 2. List 3 items that you have for each category: Fine Art 3D Modeling Web Design/Development Animation Broadcast Graphics A/V Instructional Design Graphic Design Identity Design
  • 45. 3. Study your list above. What are your strong points? What are your weaknesses? What area are you not proud of the work you have produced? 4. List all of the programs you have experience in. 5. Gather all of the pieces you have listed and bring them in next week. You may want to think about producing a product for an area you are lacking in.
  • 46. Unit 1: Lab 4.2 Self-Branding-Worksheet
  • 47. Unit 2: The Multimedia Portfolio Process CONCEPT This unit is intended to get students to formulate their main resume components and start to build their collection for their portfolio. Students will also be initially discovering and discussing career choices for Multimedia professionals. OBJECTIVES 1. Class Overview 1.1. Schedule 2. Discuss the wide range of career choices. 2.1. Discuss the different Multimedia careers. 2.2. Discuss potential employers in the area. 2.3. Discuss national hotspots for Multimedia jobs. 2.4. Discuss what requirements employers are asking for. 3. Discussion and activities about resumes and resume goals. 3.1. Create a Curriculum Vitae 3.2. List your job history. 3.3. Come up with a list of one’s own professional goals. 3.4. Describe and give examples of own skills, personal abilities and documents to be included in one’s career specific portfolio version. 4. Organizing and arranging work 4.1. Compare the work brought in against the Unit 1 Brainstorm List 4.2. Discussion on work inclusion 4.3. Discussion on possible presentation methods 4.4. Worksheet and discussion about possible career portfolio options 5. Brief Design Recap I REFERENCES ○ITT Tech Virtual Library>Reference Resources>Books<Ebrary “Creating Your Skills Portfolio: A Fifty Minute Book” by Carrie Straub is an excellent resource that you may refer to. (ISBN Number 1-56052-394-8) ○ITT Tech Virtual Library>Program Links>General Education/Technical Basics>Link Library>TB332 Professional Procedures and Portfolio Development >Self-Assessment ○ITT Tech Virtual Library>Program Links>Multimedia>Recommended Links
  • 48. ○ITT Tech Virtual Library>Program Links>Multimedia>Professional Organizations Also encourage them to explore the electronic books available. To enable them, discuss key words that should be used. METHODOLOGY Unit 2: The Multimedia Portfolio Process Resources for this Unit Activity Type of Resource Resource 3.1 Worksheet Your Career History Worksheet 3.4 Worksheet Targeting Your Portfolio Worksheet 4.2 Assignment Sheet Project Part I: List of Components KEY CONCEPTS TO BE COVERED IN CLASS A. Welcome to Brand You B. The Portfolio- A Tool for Effective Job Search C. Targeting Your Portfolio D. Conduct self-assessment of knowledge, skills and abilities. E. Organizing and arranging work F. Brief Design Recap I TEACHING TIPS FOR THIS UNIT Unit 2 guides the students in identifying values, skills and personality traits that would affect their “brand marketing”. Guide the students to perform the in class activities outlined for this unit. This unit also introduces the concept of what a portfolio can achieve for the job hunter. The team activity on “Targeting Your Portfolio” would enable the students to think about not only “what makes a portfolio” but also “what does a portfolio related to Multimedia consist of.” Encourage students to share ideas and learn from others. The teaching tips are provided for your reference. Please choose carefully according to your teaching style. 1. You may want to begin class with a brief recap of last week and refer to the schedule when explaining the objectives. This is a good exercise to start out each week and is a good example for organization. This also gives students a chance to see how far they have come and how far they have to go. 2. Provide an introduction to the concept of promoting oneself similar to a brand and how it relates to an effective job search. 3. Provide an overview of what a portfolio is and what it can achieve for the multimedia
  • 49. job hunter. Explain that the use of portfolios by savvy job candidates is increasing. Stress that employers are interested in seeing first hand how well candidates can demonstrate their skills. 4. This may also be a good point to bring in a guest speaker to talk about the qualities they look for when hiring an employee. This will give students a chance to ask any questions about interviews, the process or the program knowledge employers are looking for. 5. It should also be discussed that there are two distinct portfolios: Content and Presentations. ‘Content’ is concerned with ‘what’ needs to be included to complete a career relevant portfolio. ‘Presentation’ is concerned with the portfolio format/layout that should be used for maximum impact. It should be stressed that most Multimedia professionals are looking at ‘Presentation’ as equally as ‘Content’ driven portfolios. They want to see that you can utilize all of your multimedia skills into a cohesive product. This will introduce the students to the concept of a portfolio by explaining its meaning and importance. It will also help them realize the significance of a Multimedia program appropriate and career relevant portfolio in their individual job searches. 6. When it comes to Multimedia, there is a wide range of career choices. Students going through the ITT Multimedia program are exposed to graphic design, web design, instructional design, animation, 3D modeling, broadcast graphics, A/V and many other career choices. You may want to ask students what areas they are looking into focusing in. Stress that their education never ends at school and they will always have to do educational and professional development to keep up with the growing trends and technologies. This is especially true in Multimedia. 7. You may also want to touch base on the major Multimedia employers in the area as well as outside the area. From having asked students where their focus is in the last exercise, you may want to gear a specific employer towards them. You may also want to start a discussion about the requirements these employers are asking for and bring in a few job postings they have put out. 8. Initiate a discussion with students about the definition of a curriculum vitae, the importance of reliance and past jobs, professional goals and not being bashful about their own abilities. You may want to give a list of your own experiences. 9. Consider projecting a close-up of a bitmap image. Be sure to use a zoom factor that is large enough to create extreme pixelization. Ask the students to identify what the image represents. Then zoom out till the image is clearly identifiable. Explain to the students that bitmap images make use of individual pixels on the computer screen in order to create representations. Also explain that small bitmaps are often used on the web for their small file sizes but are limited due to pixelization. They may want to keep this in mind while thinking about their portfolio presentation.
  • 50. SUGGESTED ACTIVITES, ASSIGNMENTS & DELIVERABLES Activity 2.4. Welcome to Brand You Activity This should be a group, follow up activity to a discussion on branding. Students should be placed in teams to work on this activity. The activity includes and in-class competition to promote collaboration, involve and excite the students. It also will help students grasp the concepts of traditional marketing strategies with respect to products and services. It will lay a foundation for the application of the marketing strategy that they will create for themselves as the “product”. In teams, students should think of themselves as a design firm in competition for a job. This job includes various aspects of Multimedia including web design, graphic design and instructional design among many other things. The students will also be responsible for all of the marketing that has to do with the company. Students should build a list of strengths and weaknesses. Where there are weaknesses on the team, they may be able to find another individual who could fit that roll. They should also come up with a list of past experiences in dealing with clients, exceptional work produced or producing work in a time crunched environment. They then have to come up with a 5 minute pitch. Everyone in the group has to speak about their strengths and how they add to the group. Students should also come up with a name that reflects their group’s talents. You may want to select a few faculty members or students in other classes to come in and decide which team they would pick to make it a more competitive environment. Time: ½ hour Lab 3.1. Your Career History Worksheet After having a discussion with students about the definition of a curriculum vitae, the importance of reliance and past jobs, professional goals and not being bashful about their own abilities, have students fill out the ‘Career History’ worksheet. Their resume will be due Unit 4. Not graded, for personal use towards their resume. Time: 20 minutes Lab 3.4. Targeting Your Portfolio Worksheet After discussing and providing the students with an overview of their portfolio, break them into teams and have them participate in a group discussion and research on creating a portfolio that meets employer expectations for their chosen career. Use the ‘Targeting Your Portfolio’ worksheet to facilitate this in-class activity. Students should research jobs on the career bank and other job search web sites. Each student should choose a job posting in their area of choice, i.e. web design, graphic design. Ask the students to present to the class an overview of the position, the skills requested for and how they would showcase these skills in a portfolio. Students should be encouraged to share their ideas and learn from others. Time: 1 hour
  • 51. Lab 4.2. Project Part I: List of Components This is the stage where students begin to assemble their portfolio. At this point, the final project should be reviewed and Part I should be discussed in depth. It is due Unit 5. Time: 1 hour GRADED ASSIGNMENTS Activity 2.4. Welcome to Brand You Activity Lab 3.4. Targeting Your Portfolio Worksheet SUMMARY The unit’s lesson can be wrapped up at the end of class. Students should also be reminded of their homework. RUBRIC FOR GRADING STUDENTS Unit 1 Participation: Attendance Activity: Welcome to Worksheet and Activity: and Participation Brand You Targeting Your Portfolio Worksheet 1/4 Extremely tardy or left early, Did not do the worksheet Did not do the worksheet Barely any participation, and no feedback during and did not present Lacked any attention discussion 2/4 Less than timely attendance Worksheet half Student utilized some job to and from class, General completed and provided search site, Student listed participation with all some feedback during the skills that the employer activities and interaction with discussion was looking for other students (did what they had to do to get the job done, no extra effort), Lacked full attention 3/4 Generally timely attendance Worksheet mostly or fully Student utilized the ITT to and from class, Average completed and provided Career Bank or other job participation with all some feedback during search site if not available, activities and interaction with discussion Student analyzed a job other students, full attention posting, Student listed the for the most part skills that the employer was looking for 4/4 Timely attendance to and Worksheet thoroughly Student utilized the ITT from class, Full participation completed and provided a Career Bank or other job with all activities and lot of good, constructive search site if not available, interaction with other feedback during Student analyzed an students, full attention discussion appropriate job posting, Student listed the skills that the employer was looking
  • 52. for, Student effectively portrayed these skills in specific terms or format, Student shared thoughts on how portfolios can vary, Student worked well with their team mates ITSE STANDARDS ADDRESSED 2. Communication and Collaboration 4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making HOMEWORK Students are to finalize and digitize work for use in the Multimedia Portfolio.
  • 53. Unit 2: Activity 3.1 Your Career History Concept: You will now compile a list of your career history. This will help your formulate your resume later on. Tasks: 1. Create a Curriculum Vitae, a list of important, relevant classes you have taken in your Multimedia career. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 2. List your job history with your most recent jobs first.
  • 54. 3. Come up with a list of 10 professional goals. This can be anything from creating a professional resume to practicing your interviewing skills. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 4. Describe and give examples of own skills, personal abilities and documents
  • 55. Unit 2: Activity 3.4 Targeting Your Portfolio Concept: While working withy our team mates, utilize the ITT Tech Career Bank and local job search sites and research a job related to each of your target areas of concentration. While one student might want to look up Web Design, another student may want to look up a Graphic Design position. Each student should have their own posting answers to present, although everyone in the group will be discussing the answers. Procedure: 1. Analyze the job posting and list the skills that the employer is seeking. 2. Brainstorm within the group and create a list of skills that you must showcase for this employer including skills that you think may be helpful but are not listed in the posting. 3. Ideate on the components, examples of work, storyboards, project overviews, overviews of related lab assignments, pictures of your finished work and anything else you think that your portfolio must contain to showcase your related skills. You may want to include sections such as an overview of the position, employer requirements or skills requested for, and how you will demonstrate these skills. 4. Present your findings to the class and take note of the queries/concerns expressed and feedback provided. Rationale of the Assessment: This team exercise pushes you to think about not only ‘what makes a portfolio’ but also ‘what a portfolio related to Multimedia consists of’. You will also learn and share ideas with your classmates.
  • 56. Unit 2: Course Project Part I: List of Components Introduction: Your career relevant portfolio is a vital tool for your job search as it narrates a story through the use of ‘proof’ and relevance to your career. Therefore, your portfolio must meet your industry’s expectations and should be ‘made to impress’ your potential employer. In this assignment, your will kick start the assembly of your career-relevant portfolio. Group activities in class will provide a context for the formulation of what elements will provide you with a strategically targeted portfolio. TASKS: 1. Define the role of your Multimedia portfolio in your career strategy based on: Who is the target audience of your portfolio? What does your portfolio need to say about you? 2. Create a list of components that details what you intend to include in your Multimedia portfolio and justify why each of them should be included. 3. List the portfolio deliverable you wish to use. i.e. Will you create a e-portfolio, a hardcopy portfolio in a binder or maybe a Flash presentation. Your portfolio deliverable should reflect your strong points. 4. List the general outline for your portfolio including a career materials option. Your portfolio should include the following three elements: a. Front Matter includes an introduction and table, acknowledgment, and a table of contents. The table of contents must reflect some kind of organizational scheme. Many people simply organize items chronologically. Others will prefer to group the samples by type of skill or experience. Still others will organize items by common threads of experience or themes in their life. The introduction tells the reader something about the author and gives a brief overview highlighting for the reader the most important things to be found in the portfolio. b. Middle Part contains from 5 to 15 samples or artifacts. Each page should include a title, the actual sample or artifact, and some commentary or caption which gives additional detail. If you don't have room on each page for all of this, just put a title by each sample. Then place a title page and background or introductory material before each group of similar samples. c. Back matter summarizes the portfolio experience. It often tells what you learned about yourself in the process of creating the portfolio. This piece is optional in Professional Portfolios.
  • 57. 5. State the Design Process you wish to use and your general timeline. Note: This progress will not always be checked and it is up to you to keep up with your timeline in order to produce a final outcome. Deliverable: Your assignment is to prepare a three-page (approximately 750 words) report on the above- mentioned tasks. This report should also have a cover page with your name, instructor, class and date. When mentioning the above statements, remember that your portfolio must meet Multimedia expectations and ‘impress’ your potential Multimedia employer. It must demonstrate specific skills and experiences that you have. Be sure to define what elements will be required for your individual portfolio. Submit the report to your instructor by the end of Unit 5.
  • 58. Unit 3: The Product Overview CONCEPT Unit 3 begins the portfolio arrangement thought process as well as helps the student come up with an effective self-marketing strategy. The concept of self-branding is reinforced and students begin their ideation of their personal career search strategy. OBJECTIVES 1. Class Overview 1.1. Schedule 2. Conducting a Career Search. 2.1. Compiling a list of resources 2.2. Conducting an effective job search 3. Coming up with a Self-Marketing Strategy. 3.1. Create a self-marketing strategy. 3.2. Discuss networking. 3.3. Come up with a list of one’s own professional goals. 3.4. Describe and give examples of own skills, personal abilities and documents to be included in one’s career specific portfolio version. 4. Discuss Portfolio Diversity 4.1. Discuss arrangement of portfolios 4.2. List reasons why selected works will be included 4.3. Possible solutions to common problems 4.4. Create a brief timeline detailing your future progress. 4.5. Begin the creation of the resume 5. Brief Design Recap II REFERENCES ○ITT Tech Virtual Library>Program Links>General Education/Technical Basics>TB332 Professional Procedures and Professional Development>Link Library>Marketing Tools and Strategies ○ITT Tech Virtual Library>Reference Resources>Careers >Career OneStop >Employment Projections >Job-Hunt.Org >NACE Job Outook 2005:Student Version >Occupational Outlook Handbook
  • 59. >WetFeet.com Career Information Also encourage them to explore the electronic books available. To enable them, discuss key words that should be used. METHODOLOGY Unit 3: The Product Overview Resources for this Unit Activity Type of Resource Resource 2.2 Guest Speaker Ask a Multimedia professional to come in and talk about their company, what they look for when hiring individuals and their weekly workload. 3.2 Worksheet Activity 3.2 Your Professional Network Log 4.1 Handout Handout 4.1 The Digital Portfolio Process KEY CONCEPTS TO BE COVERED IN CLASS A. Job Search Resources B. Topics for an Effective Job Search C. Coming up with a Self-Marketing Strategy D. Discuss Portfolio Diversity E. Brief Design Recap II TEACHING TIPS FOR THIS UNIT Resources like The Career Service Job Bank has a robust feature that allows students to research companies through the portal. This feature should be strongly merchandised as it adds value to the over-all Career-Bank experience. Encourage exploration and collaboration among students on services they found most helpful. The teaching tips are provided for your reference. Please choose carefully according to your teaching style. 1. You may want to begin class with a brief recap of last week and refer to the schedule when explaining the objectives. This is a good exercise to start out each week and is a good example for organization. This also gives students a chance to see how far they have come and how far they have to go. 2. Prior to the start of class, write the following items on the board: ITT Tech Career Bank Career Services Networking Professional Organizations Classmates Online Job Boards
  • 60. Local Newspapers Ask the class “What do these items have in common?” Students must answer that these are some of the key resources that they will utilize in their job search planning. Keep this warm-up activity brief and explain that the class will discuss these elements later during this session. This is an overview of the major tools they can utilize during their job search. 3. This is a great time to invite a guest speaker from a company or recruiting agency to come in to speak on the subject of job searching. 4. Share with the students some tips that will assist them in planning their job search. Remind then that this is a competition and the most effective competitor will be the best competitor. Visit http://www2.jobtrak.com/help_manuals/jobmanual/ for more information on Conducting an Effective Job Search. 5. Remind the students that their prospective employers are the “buyers”. They need to make the employers aware that they are available and convince them that they are the best choice to fit their needs. Whether students want to be freelance designers or work for a design firm, it is important that they know their own value and have a marketing plan. This lecture should focus on the many aspects of self-marketing, such as: 1) Develop a persuasive business offer Learn how to implement a successful marketing strategy. Tips include: How to find a profitable niche How to lay out your portfolio for maximum impact How to structure your website 2) See your best ever results from prospecting Learn effective techniques for contacting new clients. Tips include: How to identify the most lucrative clients How to approach telephone prospecting How to pitch your services in meetings 3) Get the most from your website Learn how to promote your services online and boost your enquiry rate. Tips include: How to increase your search engine ranking How to set up an email campaign How to write your emails 4) Get your story in the newspapers Learn how to raise your profile so new clients actively seek you out. Tips include: How to write and send a press release
  • 61. How to write an advertisement How to target the right newspapers 5) Build your reputation as 'designer of choice' Learn how to keep your service client-focused and build barriers to your competition. Tips include: How to stay visible How to stay valuable How to expand your business services 6. Networking: Start this activity by stating that almost 70% of the jobs are never advertised. In such a scenario, career networking is crucial. Explain that Networking refers to Exchanging Information and Services among individuals and groups having a common interest. Ask students what would be their network? Wait for a few responses and then tell students that their class is their network. As they graduate and move out of college, their respective networks will expand to include their workplaces, colleagues etc. You may get some ideas about networking from the article found here: http://entrepreneurs.about.com/cs/networking/a/networking4busy.htm 7. Items 7-10 are meant to be a discussion with students referencing Handout 4.1 The Digital Portfolio Process. A Portfolio is an organized collection of materials that demonstrate a person’s expansion of knowledge and skills over time. The contents, organization and presentation of materials in portfolios vary and depend on their audience. Discuss the advantages of Digital Portfolios vs. Hardcopy Portfolios. This is especially important in Multimedia as it allows for the students to display their moving animations rather than simply stills. 1. Digital technology facilitates the reproduction of portfolio content. 2. Digital portfolios are relatively inexpensive to duplicate. 3. Digital portfolios support greater creativity. 4. Digital portfolios can communicate one’s capabilities in using technology. 8. There are many challenges associated with digital portfolios. 1. They often times require a great level of knowledge and a wider variety of skills. 2. They often times require professional support. 3. They can require expensive equipment. 4. They require more time and energy. 5. They may require the viewers to have technology skills and proper equipment. 6. If not done properly, the digital format can detract from the original content. 9. Discuss Framing Their Portfolio by setting up a set of structures that fit various works
  • 62. together and creating continuity among all the components. Continuity might be communicated through a theme or a set of recurring ideas, values or metaphors. Framing Your Portfolio Around a Theme promotes continuity while illustrating their artistry. It often times expresses talent and creativity just as much as the artifacts contained within it. Themes might reflect a certain philosophy, professional concerns or even an era. To develop a portfolio around a theme ask yourself these questions: 1. Is there any metaphor, idea, concept or image that recurs in my life or sums up who I am as a multimedia student? 2. How could I demonstrate my professional talents by illustrating them through this theme? 3. What artifacts might I include to do this? 4. How might I use the help of others to make sure my theme is consistent and understandable by others? You may want to add further explanations to these questions also ask students for examples. Students may also want to think about framing their portfolio around a question or around a set of standards or requirements. 10. Have students take out the digital copy of their portfolio items. Have them fully examine all of its contents and then determine which artifacts support their theme. Selections can be made by asking themselves these questions: 1. Does this artifact meet the criteria for which I am framing my portfolio? How? 2. Is this artifact the best example I can use for demonstrating my criteria? If so, why? 3. Should I include this artifact in my portfolio? Why? Then have students create a log sheet of the artifacts they wish to include. Remind them they must be selective and remain focused, keeping the audience in mind. SUGGESTED ACTIVITES, ASSIGNMENTS & DELIVERABLES Activity 3.2: Your Professional Network Log Handout the worksheet and ask students to complete their professional network log. This Excel workbook should be turned in when the time is up. Time: 1 hour Lab 4.1. The Digital Portfolio Process Go over Handout 4.1: The Digital Portfolio Process with the students. Have them look at their items they gathered for possible inclusion in their portfolio. Have them create a list of the works they wish to include and list the reasons why. This will later be an addition to Project 1 that is due next week. If they have already started on this list, then have them compare it to the handout. Time: 1/2 hour
  • 63. Activity 4.5. Resume Checklist Students are to use this resume checklist to compare against their resume in progress that is due Unit 5. It is recommended that you talk about each item in order to answer any questions that may arise. You may also wish to offer some further explanation about each item. Time: 1/2 hour GRADED ASSIGNMENTS Activity 3.2 Your Professional Network Log SUMMARY The unit’s lesson can be wrapped up at the end of class. Students should also be reminded of their homework. RUBRIC FOR GRADING STUDENTS Unit 1 Participation: Attendance Worksheet: Activity 3.2 and Participation Your Professional Network Log 1/4 Extremely tardy or left early, Did not do the workbook. Barely any participation, Lacked any attention 2/4 Less than timely attendance Student gathered some to and from class, General data, Student listed =come participation with all personal details activities and interaction with other students (did what they had to do to get the job done, no extra effort), Lacked full attention 3/4 Generally timely attendance Student gathered most of to and from class, Average the data, Student listed a participation with all few network members, activities and interaction with student had a few personal other students, full attention details for the most part 4/4 Timely attendance to and Student thoroughly from class, Full participation completed the assignment, with all activities and they listed a lot of tools interaction with other discussed in class for their students, full attention job search area, they came up with at least 6 contacts,
  • 64. They include at least 2 personal details ITSE STANDARDS ADDRESSED 2. Communication and Collaboration 3. Research and Information Fluency 4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making 5. Digital Citizenship 6. Technology Operations and concepts HOMEWORK Students should finalize their Resume, due next week, and Project 1, due Unit 5.
  • 65. Unit 3: Activity 3.2: Your Professional Network Log Concept: You have the tools ready and are ready to start running down the path of employment success. At the end of this assignment, you will create a strategy to put various job search tools to use. Using Microsoft Excel, create a workbook with three sheets: Tools for my Job search, My Network and My Personal Details. Format these sheets such that they can be utilized to capture the information detailed below. Your logs should be complete and functional. Sheet 1: Tools for my Job Search. ○ Tools that you will use to research jobs. ○ Frequency at which you will refer to these tools. ○ Benefit of each particular job search tool. Sheet 2: My Network ○ Your professional contacts that may assist you in your job search ○ For each contact include: Name Job Title Company Details Contact Information Sheet 3: My Personal Details ○ Details of companies you have applied to and the materials submitted (i.e. resume, cover letter, and work samples) ○ Whether you followed up after initial submission. ○ Whether you received an interview call and the result.
  • 66. Unit 3: Handout 4.1: The Digital Portfolio Process Concept: There is no right way to create a portfolio, though there should be a systematic procedure involved. There can be five basic steps in the development of a portfolio. Each of these stages consists of several distinct processes or steps and they are: 1. Planning the portfolio- In this stage you focus the goals of your portfolio and frame its objectives. 2. Considering portfolio contents- In this stage you collect, select and reflect on the materials you will include in your portfolio. 3. Designing the portfolio- In this stage, you organize the materials you have selected and assemble them into digital pieces that make up your portfolio. 4. Evaluating the portfolio- In this stage you conduct formative evaluation to improve your portfolio-in-progress and summative evaluation to determine the quality of your portfolio. 5. Publishing the portfolio- in this stage, you perform the activities necessary to present your portfolio materials in a format that others can view. Stage 1: Planning Your Portfolio Answer the following questions: 1. Why am I creating this portfolio in the first place? 2. What kind of portfolio do I want to create? 3. Who am I creating a portfolio for? 4. What are my goals for creating a digital portfolio? 5. Did you hold a formative evaluation about your progress? Stage 2: Considering Portfolio Contents Answer the following questions: 1. Is there any metaphor, idea or image that recurs in my life or sums up who I am? 2. How could I demonstrate my professional talents by illustrating them through a theme? 3. What artifacts might I include to do this? 4. How might I use the help of others to make sure that my theme is consistent and understandable to others? 5. Organization makes the process of collecting materials for possible inclusion in your portfolio less tedious and nerve wracking. Have you gathered as many artifacts as possible and then sorted out only the best representations of your work? 6. Have you drawn up a ‘Rationale Statement’ and a proper ‘Resume’ to include? 7. Have your reviewed your log sheet? 8. Did you hold a formative evaluation about your progress? Stage 3: Designing the Portfolio
  • 67. 1. Is everything included in your portfolio tied together or unified in some way? 2. Have you organized your portfolio in a presentable Table of Contents and placed each item into appropriate categories? 3. Have you storyboarded each change of scene in your electronic portfolio? 4. Have you created a cohesive navigation system, whether linear or non-linear? 5. Did you make an appropriate decision about software use? 6. Are all your documents in appropriate digital format that is compatible with the software program you chose? 7. Have you tested a template version of your portfolio? 8. Did you thoroughly plan out the production stages? 9. Did you complete all the stages of production? 10. Did you hold a formative evaluation about your progress? Stage 4: Evaluating the Portfolio 1. Have you consistently held formative evaluations all the way through the process? 2. Did you create a summative evaluation? 3. Did you measure the growth of the portfolio, its start to finish? 4. Was the level of technology skills up to par? 5. Did you product match your steps? Stage 5: Publish your portfolio 1. Did you upload your portfolio, burn it to many disks or print hardcopies? 2. Did you fully test and have other people test your portfolio? 3. Did you come up with a self-marketing plan for your portfolio?
  • 68. Unit 3: Activity 4.5: Resume Checklist Concept: The following checklist has been designed to assist you in writing your resume. This checklist reflects the expertise of the Career Center staff developed through critiquing thousands of resumes, discussing selection criteria with numerous employers, and gathering input from a wide range of career professionals.. APPEARANCE • is inviting and easy to read; not too much information • uses appropriate font styles and font sizes (10-14 pts.) • incorporates enough white space between sections to facilitate skimming • centers text; adequate margins • creates visual impact using bullets, boldface, underlining, italics, and font sizes to emphasize key words (for scannable resumes, use boldface only) • printed on high quality (16-25 lb.) bond paper • print is letter quality ORGANIZATION AND FORMAT • appropriate format includes keyword phrases of profession • presents strongest qualifications first • appropriate length: l page for every 6-10 years of work experience WRITING STYLE • begins sentences or phrases with powerful action verbs • short paragraphs mostly under five lines; short sentences • brief, succinct language; no unnecessary words • absolutely free from grammatical, spelling, punctuation, usage, and typographical errors CONTENT Contact Information • address, current and permanent (if necessary) • telephone number(s) where you can be reached 9-5 Objective (Optional for chronological resume. Required for functional resume.) • briefly indicates the sort of position, title, and possible area of specialization sought • for management or supervisory positions, indicates level of responsibility sought • language is specific, employer centered not self-centered; avoids broad or vague statements
  • 69. Summary of Skills, Accomplishments, or Expertise • identifies 3-6 key achievements that support the objective • summarizes relevant work experience and accomplishments that support the objective Education and Training • Highest level of attainment is listed first; work from most current degree backward • degree in progress or most recently completed degree; include type of degree, name of university, location of university, date of graduation or anticipated date • list of other degrees, relevant higher education coursework, continuing professional education or training courses, and study abroad • major, minor, or areas of concentration • omit high school if you have completed more than two years of college unless referencing impressive honors or relevant extracurricular activities • relevant courses, papers, projects; include paper or project titles • GPA, honors, awards, scholarships • percentage of educational expenses earned Employment Experience Include all paid, volunteer, intern, or cooperative education experiences that are relevant to your objective. Start with most recent experience if using chronological format. • title held, organization name, city, state, or country location (if not U.S.A.) • dates position held; if several positions for one employer, list employer once • responsibilities listed in order of each item's relative value to the future employer; indicate transferable skills and adaptive abilities used on the job • accomplishments on your job; what problems did you face? What solutions did you find? • contributions to the organization, i.e., ways your work helped increase profit, membership publicity, funding, motivation, efficiency, productivity, quality; saved time or money; improved programs, management, communication, information flow etc. • quantitative or qualitative indicators that describe the results of your contributions or accomplishments, i.e., "increased sales by $50,000"; "reduced staff turnover by 25%"; "significantly improved staff ability to access data" • learning that took place on the job that is relevant to your job objective (optional) • describe accomplishments in jargon of the field Skills • computer skills: software applications, languages, hardware, operating systems • language skills: specific level of fluency and ability to read and write as "basic," "intermediate," or "advanced" • other Extracurricular Activities, Community Service, Professional Associations • list of significant positions of responsibility; include title, name of organization or team, dates • leadership roles, achievements, and transferable skills that are relevant • include hobbies and personal interests only if they are relevant
  • 70. MARKETING FOCUS • demonstrates ability or potential to do the job; supports your objective • speaks to the employer's needs and requirements (employer-centered not self-centered) • indicates knowledge of the field, typical issues or problems, solutions • omits racial, religious, or political affiliations unless a bona fide occupational qualification • contains only personal data relevant to your objective; omits age, sex, marital status, national origin, health, names of references
  • 71. Unit4: Stage Analyze CONCEPT Unit 4 is the analyzation phase of the portfolio process. Students will be analyzing the entire portfolio scope, determining its structure, and reviewing how ADDIE can be used to develop their portfolio. OBJECTIVES 1. Class Overview 1.1. Schedule 2. Analyze the Portfolio 2.1. Analyze the scope of the project. 2.2. Determine the audience. 2.3. Student built schedule and goals. 2.4. Create introduction content. 3. Determine the Portfolio Structure. 3.1. Outline vs. Table of Contents 3.2. Discuss E-Portfolios. 3.3. Select method of presentation. 3.4. Discuss different types of portfolios in full depth. 3.5. Discuss planning for maintenance. 4. Instructor Conferences with Students 4.1. Instructor reviews and collects resumes. 5. Reviewing and using ADDIE in this course REFERENCES ○http://ed.isu.edu/addie/ ○http://www.intulogy.com/addie/ ○http://www.dennistester.com/addie.htm Also encourage them to explore the electronic books available. To enable them, discuss key words that should be used.
  • 72. METHODOLOGY Unit 4: Stage Analyze Resources for this Unit Activity Type of Resource Resource 2.3 Worksheet Worksheet 2.3: Stage Analyze 3.3 Handout Handout 3.3: Different Types of Portfolios KEY CONCEPTS TO BE COVERED IN CLASS A. Analyze the Portfolio B. Determine the Portfolio Structure. C. Instructor Conferences with Students D. Reviewing and using ADDIE in this course TEACHING TIPS FOR THIS UNIT This is the Analyze phase and students should be encouraged to thoroughly plan out their portfolios. The use of ADDIE will be the premise for all the units over the next 6 weeks. The teaching tips are provided for your reference. Please choose carefully according to your teaching style. 1. You may want to begin class with a brief recap of last week and refer to the schedule when explaining the objectives. This is a good exercise to start out each week and is a good example for organization. This also gives students a chance to see how far they have come and how far they have to go. 2. Class should be started with a brief overview of ADDIE and the Analyze phase. Students will be using ADDIE to shape their project and it should be reviewed in that manner. Students will be analyzing their entire product scope, designing it, developing it, implanting it in interviews and lastly, evaluating it. Visit either of these sites for more reference: http://ed.isu.edu/addie/, http://www.intulogy.com/addie/ 3. It is always important to first identify your audience, which will help you target your product better. Explain to the students that if they know they will be interviewing for a web design position, they may want to showcase more work in that area as well as a few pieces from the other areas. Regardless of their motivation, conscious awareness of it will help you consider the intended audience which in turn can enable you to design a portfolio that is more “in tune” with its concerns. Ask students who their target markets might be in order to get a conversation going about the topic. 4. Students should begin to build a Table of Contents that they will want to include to give the viewer interactive, non-linear options. Printed tables of contents indicate page numbers where each part starts, while online ones offer links to go to each part. The format and location of the page numbers is a matter of style for the publisher. If the page numbers
  • 73. appear after the heading text, they might be preceded by characters called leaders, usually dots or periods, that run from the chapter or section titles on the opposite side of the page, or the page numbers might remain closer to the titles. In some cases, the page number appears before the text. The student may want to stylize this Table of Contents to match the design concept they come up with. You may want to visit the following sites to give students some interactive options for Tables of Content: http://www.solarviews.com/eng/toc.htm, http://www-chaos.umd.edu/history/toc.html, http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/const-toc.html 5. As a prep for the next activity on different types of portfolios, you may want to bring up a few e-portfolios on the computer. Also invites student to share their findings from their homework last week. Ask them to share their likes and dislikes with the class. 6. There are many different types of portfolios. This discussion should be conducted while the students have “Handout 3.3: Different Types of Portfolios” to reference. Before referencing the handout, you may want to go over these important topics: 1. Linear vs. Non-linear 2. Interactivity 3. Color Schemes 4. Font Schemes 5. Unifying Factors a. Underlying colors b. Fonts c. Colors d. Shapes e. Theme Remind students that their selection should be included in their Project 1 report, due next week. 7. It is very important to plan for maintenance when developing a portfolio because it will always be growing. You may wish to reference The Core Process in which the fifth and final phase, Launch and Beyond, involves the actual launching of the product. This stage is divided into three sections: delivery, launch, and maintenance. Topics covered include the creation of a handoff package, site documentation, and development of a site maintenance plan. SUGGESTED ACTIVITES, ASSIGNMENTS & DELIVERABLES Worksheet 2.3: Stage Analyze The Stage Analyze worksheet will help students analyze their project and come up with answers for the very important questions. This should be conducted after a brief discussion
  • 74. about all the topics. Time: 1/2 hour Lab 2.4. Introduction Content Student should develop an introduction for their portfolio. This introduction should be more of an artist statement and sum up their intentions, methods and procedure for developing their portfolio. They may work on this while the Instructor conducts individual student conferences. Time: 1/2 hour GRADED ASSIGNMENTS Worksheet 2.3: Stage Analyze SUMMARY The unit’s lesson can be wrapped up at the end of class. Students should also be reminded of their homework. RUBRIC FOR GRADING STUDENTS Unit 1 Participation: Attendance Worksheet: Worksheet 2.3: and Participation Stage Analyze 1/4 Extremely tardy or left early, Did not fill out the Barely any participation, worksheet properly Lacked any attention 2/4 Less than timely attendance Student filled in some brief to and from class, General information participation with all activities and interaction with other students (did what they had to do to get the job done, no extra effort), Lacked full attention 3/4 Generally timely attendance Student filled in most of to and from class, Average the information participation with all activities and interaction with other students, full attention for the most part 4/4 Timely attendance to and Student worked through from class, Full participation every piece of content and with all activities and thoroughly came up with a interaction with other response students, full attention
  • 75. ITSE STANDARDS ADDRESSED 2. Creativity and Innovation 4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making HOMEWORK Students should finalize Project 1, due next week and the Table of Contents.
  • 76. Unit 4: Worksheet 2.3: Stage Analyze Concept: The first stage of the portfolio development process involves focusing the goals of your portfolio and framing its objectives. You will also be organizing the portfolio contents, table of contents and the objectives. Define Your Audience: Define Your Central Theme General Outline for Content Presentation Style Your Portfolio Schedule, Units 4-10 Your Portfolio Goals
  • 77. Unit 4: Handout 3.3: Different Types of Portfolios Concept: There are many different methods to create a portfolio with. This worksheet will compare and contrast common programs and methods that help to market one’s work. 1. Powerpoint Presentations What? A powerpoint presentation slide show or interactive show can be used and implemented in many different ways. You can create both linear and non-linear portfolios, you can make them interactive or control the user’s viewing time and you can also make it exciting with animations, sounds and movies. Pros: There are a lot of pros to using powerpoint. It’s extremely versatile and you can design everything from scratch or a template. Anyone with a computer can view it and you can export it as a website. Maintenance is done simply by adding another slide. Cons: You must make sure you properly embed sounds, graphics, fonts and movies into the show before sending it off or else the whole show will be completely altered when viewed on another computer. 2. A Flash Presentation What? A Flash Presentation can be built to impress with jazzy transitions, effects and interactivity. It can also be linear or non-linear. It can be opened from a cd or placed in a web site. Pros: A Flash portfolio can be both impressive and functional. Flash can import and edit almost any media element. Cons: You must make sure you properly embed sounds, graphics, fonts and movies into the show. You must also make sure versions match or the employer may have to download a plug-in. Maintenance can be a lot of work if you don’t plan for it. 3. A Director Projector Kiosk What? A Director Projector can be built to impress with jazzy transitions, effects and interactivity. It can also be linear or non-linear. It can be opened from a cd or placed in a web site. Pros: A Director Projector can be both impressive and functional. Director can import and edit almost any media element. The projector will open on any computer. It can be exported as a website. Cons: You must make sure you properly embed sounds, graphics, fonts and movies into the show. Maintenance can be a lot of work if you don’t plan for it.
  • 78. 4. An E-Portfolio What? You have virtually no restrictions when designing a website and it can be as much as your ability can design. It can be accessed by multiple people at the same time. Pros: Web sites can hold virtually any media element. Websites are mostly quick to load and require little effort. If you design your pages in a way that they can be easily updated, maintenance can be a breeze. Websites are a great way to market yourself because they can be accessed by anyone. Cons: Watch the load times- no employer wants to watch around for a video to load. Transitions are not as easy to do as with other programs. Maintenance can be a lot of work if you don’t plan for it. 5. A Combination What? If you have the ability to impress the employer in more than just one way, why not do it? You can design an e-portfolio, leave the employer with a Director Projector on cd and present your work by referencing hardcopies. Pros: Networking! This makes quite the impression and shows off all of your talents. You can be very creative with where each element comes into play. Cons: Can you think of any?
  • 79. Unit 5: Stage Design CONCEPT Unit 5 is the design phase of the portfolio process. Students will be coming up with the entire design for their portfolio. OBJECTIVES 1. Class Overview 1.1. Schedule 2. Reviewing Stage Design 3. Design Recap II 3.1. Design Principles 3.2. Color Theory and Good Relationships 3.3. Typography Overview 3.4. Re-discuss Self-branding and Identity 3.5. Back it Up! 3.6. Rendering Time 4. Building Components 4.1. Create a Cover Letter 4.2. Developing one’s identity 4.3. Begin Storyboarding 4.4. Creating a Design Sheet 5. Assign Project II REFERENCES ○ http://www.intulogy.com/addie/design.html ○ http://www.papress.com/thinkingwithtype/ ○ http://www.designwritingresearch.org/ ○ http://www.colourlovers.com ○ http://www.1001freefonts.com Also encourage them to explore the electronic books available. To enable them, discuss key words that should be used.
  • 80. METHODOLOGY Unit 5: Stage Design Resources for this Unit Activity Type of Resource Resource 3.1 Handout Handout 3.1 Gestalt 4.2 Activity Activity 4.2 Creating Your Identity 4.4 Activity Activity 4.4 Create a Design Sheet 5.0 Handout Course Project Part II: Assembling the Portfolio KEY CONCEPTS TO BE COVERED IN CLASS A. Reviewing Stage Design B. Design Recap II C. Building Components D. Assign Project II TEACHING TIPS FOR THIS UNIT The Design phase is one of the most important phases in this project. The portfolio is proof of value and accomplishment to an employer. It is a portable esteem builder and grows along with an individual’s professional growth. Multimedia students are encouraged to have visual, interactive portfolios for maximum impact. Planning is crucial for proper development. The teaching tips are provided for your reference. Please choose carefully according to your teaching style. 1. You may want to begin class with a brief recap of last week and refer to the schedule when explaining the objectives. This is a good exercise to start out each week and is a good example for organization. This also gives students a chance to see how far they have come and how far they have to go. 2. Instructor should hand back graded resumes and encourage students to redesign according to the suggestions made. Remind appropriate grammar and spelling is ALWAYS necessary. 3. Instructor should collect Project I from the students. 4. Stage Design is very important in the development process of any project. You first will want to organize the contents of the portfolio. One of the main steps should be the actual design of the presentation: fonts, color scheme, theme. You will also want to storyboard each scene or slide before developing it. Storyboarding helps to organize one’s thought and plan before they begin building. For more information, please visit:
  • 81. http://www.intulogy.com/addie/design.html 6. It is important that students design their portfolio with good design skills in mind. Students will have to find their own method of unifying everything as a whole. The Gestalt Theories may help them find common elements. Review Handout 3.1. Gestalt and ask students to interpret each theory in their own words. 7. Discuss different elements of color theory as related to design. Students may also wish to start thinking of color schemes at this time: Visit http://www.colourlovers.com for some ideas. Color When we start out with color, we usually think of color theory. Practice makes perfect- the longer you practice it, the more you will know and the better you will become. There are a lot of guides you have to learn along the way. 1. Crayola- this is where our problem with color has started! Most of us have learned to match 8 simple colors that came in a pack. Then you worked with 16, 48 and then the big 64 pack with the pencil sharpener on the back! Instead of naming colors and organizing by names, crayola should have organized by value/hues/and saturation. This would have been the more healthy way to do it. 2. Similarly we work with our sliders in Photoshop the same way. We up the numbers on our RGB scales to hopefully get what we want. Designers tend to start of thinking in values, not numerically. 3. What is the normal start of the color making process for designers? Value is the lightness or darkness of a color. Secondly, they think about the saturation- how dull or vibrant a color will be. The third is hue- pointing on a color wheel what color we want. Combining value, hue and saturation makes up images. 4. Value- Value is the strongest of the three. By lowering your values, fading them in and out, or popping it with contrast- you can demand attention or approach a subject softly. Value is absolutely relative- it is always a certain color numerically, but it is not always a certain color to the eye. (Example #1: Draw a gray bar against a gradient of black vs white.) Notice the gray bar on the screen. You eyes may be tricking you into thinking that that bar is darker on the left than it is on the right, but its not. It’s the same shade. This is called learning to see- your brain will always try to up the contrast. It can make the same color look darker against a light background and light against a dark background. Consequentially, our minds prefer high contrast. Our eyes are typically draw to the objects in high contrast. 5. Hue – is the point on the compass we are facing. (Pull up a color wheel) By limiting the number of colors we see, and choosing the colors next to it- we are giving ourselves a color scheme of Analogous Colors. Hue is also relative- so whether our color wheel is on a black or white background, the red is still red. 6. Saturation- is the intensity of a color. Kids love pure saturation! Think about Nickelodeon, Lisa Frank and Barbie. Adults tend to go more desaturated as they get older- think Martha Stewart. Saturation Rule #1- Saturation is always more
  • 82. intense in large areas of color. 7. Work large to small- When picking colors, start with the largest object first since this will set the color theme and then work down to the smallest. (Draw med circle- then draw a larger circle that will make it seem smaller and then draw a small circle that will make it seem bigger.) 8. Color Relationship- Rule #1: There is no such thing as a good color, just good color relationships. Rule #2: Text must have high contrast if you want it to be read. Tinting: Adding White to your color palette will give you more of a pastel color scheme. Shading: Adding black to your color palette- making everything darker. 9. Color Worksheet: We actually use a color to affect our color palette instead of changing the tint or shade. We can do this in Photoshop and simply hold down our ALT key in between layers to apply. This will give us a nice analogous range. We can also play around with our color options in Illustrator. http://www.adobe.com/designcenter/video_workshop/ (Color Guide in Illustrator) 8. Review the Basics of Typography: Students may wish to select different fonts at this time. Visit http://www.1001freefonts.com for some ideas. 1. Dissecting Typography 1. Identify the purposes and origins of text Typography: Johannes Gutenburg in Germany – early 15th century was the one to really revolutionize writing in the West with his printing press. Before him, everything was manufactured and copied by hand. Therefore the first typefaces were directly modeled on forms of calligraphy. Anatomy: There are a lot of different attributes to type or to a font. The main parts you need to know about are: Serif- Serif and Sans Serif Baseline-is where all the letters sit. The most crucial edge. X-Height-the height of the main body of the lowercase letter, excluding the ‘ascenders’ (lowercase L) and ‘descenders’ (lowercase y) Cap Height- the distance from the baseline to the top of a capital letter. It also determines the point size. Size: Height Typography has its own little system of measure. It can be measured in inches, mm, or pixels- and most software app let you choose which one you would like to work with. Picas and Points are the standard and preferred unit of measure. 12 points=1 pica Abbreviations: 8 picas=8p
  • 83. 8 points= 8pts Width Each letter also has a horizontal measure called a set width. The set width is the width of the actual letter and a sliver of space that protects it from the other letters. Tracking: Adjusting the overall space between letters rather than the space between two characters is called tracking. Leading: Leading is your space in between baselines Alignment: Justified Left and right edges are both even, though ugly gaps can occur. Flush Left Left edge is straight and right edge is soft Flush Right Right edge is straight and left edge is soft, not the normal way people read and can seem unfamiliar Centered Uneven lines are centered between the left and right edges, formal and classic- though can also seem mournful Rest In Peace Vertical Alignment You may encounter vertical alignment on signs(motel) or the spines of books Stacked Capitals- form more stable stacks, centering the column helps to even out the widths Stacked Lowercase- letters can seem awkward because of the ascenders and descenders: vertigo Vertical Baselines Think of the way you would normally read a book spine, people are more used to turning their head to the right to read spines “Vertigo, A film by Alfred Hitchcock” Hierarchy A hierarchy expresses an organization system for content- emphasizing some data, diminishing others. You can create your cues using symbols, indents, line breaks, letters, roman numbers, font changes- the possibilities are endless Most web sites are controlled by hierarchies: content is nested inside subtitles that are nested inside titles Paragraphs Paragraphs do not occur in nature. Whereas sentences are grammatical elements intrinsic to the spoken language- paragraphs are only used to divide content.
  • 84. Words You can express the meaning of a work through the spacing, sizing, and placement of letter on the page. Designers often think this way when creating logotypes, posters or editorial headlines. C o m p r ession 2. Identify the different type faces and fonts Each font is generally from a font family- like Adobe Garamond- it comes in italic, regular, expert, bold, semi-bold. Remember that you can do a lot with just one font by using the other members of its family. 3. Identify the font technology types 4. Identify the common character sets The most common fonts for print are: Helvetica and Times Roman The most common fonts for the screen are Verdana and Georgia. Though, remember that the most common fonts used on the web are generally Sans- Serif because they are easier to read within small spaces. 5. Explain the attributes for displaying text for multimedia 6. Identify different text file formats Explain hypermedia and optical character recognition 9. Review Branding What is a brand? A brand is an idea, not a thing. Memorable brands such as Altoids or Starbucks thrive on a coherent set of products and a strong, identifiable design approach. A successful brand connects to its audience on an emotional level, representing a feeing, an idea, a way of life. Use design to shape your own brand, whether its your band, team, gallery or yourself. Brand Strategy is the combined understanding of your product’s position in the marketplace (target audience, competition), its visual identity (from the product itself to packaging, logos and promotional materials), and your marketing initiatives (how your product or service will be delivered to customers). These components should work together to support your business goals. Brand Positioning How does your products or service compare to your competition? What makes it unique or different? Who is your potential market? Brand Identity Brand Identity is the visual language that a company uses to communicate with its audience. The name, the logo and the products all make-up the foundation for our brand’s visual language. Product Your product or service is the most important part of your brand. A well-designed product provides an immediate, emotional connection to your audience. It is crucial to find reliable vendors capable of manufacturing your product in a high-quality and timely fashion. Key factors include material, size, color, graphics, labels, hang tags and packaging. These elements become part of the product as it speaks to people in a sales environment.
  • 85. 10. Discuss the idea of creating an identity, a logo to represent you on all of your products. Logo Presentation: Think about your favorite t-shirt, your trendy haircut and you’re your fancy car- these are all visual expressions help shape your identity- the way you present yourself and the way others perceive you. Now imagine taking these elements and distilling them into a single graphic representation that expresses your distinct characteristics. This distinctive mark would be your logo. You might put it on a poster, on a CD label or on a T-shirt for your band. Process There is a process to developing a logo believe it or not. There are three steps: 1. Research and Ideation: Analyze and define what you are trying to represent. Develop a list of attributes of characteristics that best represent your goals. 2. Design Development: Turn your ideas into form. Think of ways to visually represent the most important attributes using colors, symbols, typography and icons. 3. Final Execution: Distill your ideas and forms into one clear concept. Apply final touches and prepare your logo for the public eye. Logotypes Most logos include typography. A font that is chosen for the logo, generally stays consistent on all your products. Icons and Symbols An icon is and image that represents something based on resemblance such as a bus, dog or woman. A symbol represents by association, not necessarily resemblance. They are usually abstract such as the recycling and biohazard signs. Final Execution From T-shirts to websites, to buildings and vans- logo applications are endless. Plaster your logo everywhere to give yourself maximum visibility. 11. It is important to always back up your work. Students will want to back up their work on dvds, hard drives and FTPs. Students will be working on a project that utilizes their life’s art work. It is a good idea to always have important work in at least 2 locations. Also remember to save your work periodically when working on it. 12. Remind students to leave time for rendering or begin rendering in groups. 13. The storyboard is a visual plan or sketch of your portfolio. The process of creating a storyboard will force you to think about how you plan on presenting information in your portfolio. Storyboards demonstrate the layout of the different pieces or ‘nodes’ of information in your portfolio. It will also map out your expectation of how viewers will navigate through various parts of the portfolio. You may choose a linear or non-linear option and storyboards will help you to see the results. 14. You may wish to bring in sample hardcopy portfolios or have formers students bring in their portfolios and experiences.
  • 86. SUGGESTED ACTIVITES, ASSIGNMENTS & DELIVERABLES Activity 4.1: Create a Cover Letter A cover letter is part of your “brand” and it is the introduction to your resume. Create a professional cover letter specific to your program that you can use to introduce yourself to each of the identified companies. Your cover letter must state your career search objectives and an accurate statement of your abilities. Ensure that cover letters are not a list of technical skills or a “rehash” of the information found in the student’s resume. It must be a broad overview of skills targeted to the specific company and serve as a personal introduction. Evaluate the students based on format and word choice. They may complete it for homework if it is not completed in the allotted time. Time: ½ minutes Activity 4.2 Creating Your Identity After a lesson on identity, have students sketch and work on a logo. Pass out Activity 4.2 Creating Your Identity worksheet to guide students in creating stationary items with the newly developed identity. Hint: Once the business card is designed, the students can simply copy the information into the other documents. Time: 1 hour Activity 4.3 Begin Storyboards After the storyboard discussion, you may want to allow students time to begin working on their storyboards. You may want to show a few examples of storyboards to get their minds in gear. Once their storyboards are complete, they should go into a template that they should create. It is usually easier to either print the templates all at once or scan in the storyboards on blank paper and insert them into the digital storyboard. Either way will work, though scanning them in and electronically entering in the data could be neater and allow the student to produce copies on the fly. Time ½ hour Activity 4.4 Create a Design Sheet Design Sheets are a base point for the designer to begin by arranging their color scheme in a series of blocks, lay out their fonts and any consistent graphics or shapes. Have students develop a design sheet. They may complete it for homework if it is not completed in the allotted time. Remind them of the vast resources available on the internet to help them: http://www.colourlovers.com and http://www.1001freefonts.com. Time: ½ hour Activity 5.0: Course Project Part II: Assembling the Portfolio Assign the second portion of the portfolio process. You may wish to bring in sample hardcopy portfolios or have formers students bring in their portfolios and experiences.
  • 87. Time: 20-30 minutes GRADED ASSIGNMENTS Activity 4.1: Create a Cover Letter Activity 4.2 Creating Your Identity SUMMARY The unit’s lesson can be wrapped up at the end of class. Students should also be reminded of their homework. RUBRIC FOR GRADING STUDENTS Unit 1 Participation: Attendance Activity: Activity 4.1: Activity 4.2 Creating and Participation Create a Cover Letter Your Identity 1/4 Extremely tardy or left Student did not Student did not turn early, Barely any complete the assignment in or produce any work participation, Lacked any attention 2/4 Less than timely Student created a Student attempted, but attendance to and from professional cover letter failed at the task either class, General participation with many spelling or in poor design or with all activities and grammar mistakes, missing components interaction with other student did not include a students (did what they closing comment or it had to do to get the job was unacceptable, few done, no extra effort), contact options listed Lacked full attention 3/4 Generally timely Student created a Student completed the attendance to and from professional cover letter components to the best class, Average participation with little spelling or of their ability, all with all activities and grammar mistakes, the components were interaction with other student mentioned present but thought students, full attention for general qualifications and concept were the most part that made them a good missing candidate, student closed with an inappropriate closing comment, student included their contact info 4/4 Timely attendance to and Student created a Student thoroughly from class, Full professional cover letter planned the concept, participation with all with no spelling or theme, fonts, color activities and interaction grammar mistakes, the scheme and procedure,
  • 88. with other students, full student mentioned completed the attention specific qualifications assignment, all that made them a good components present candidate, student closed with good design and with a complimentary concept thank you message, student included their contact info ITSE STANDARDS ADDRESSED 2. Creativity and Innovation 4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making 6. Technology Operations and Concepts HOMEWORK Complete storyboards.
  • 89. Unit 5 Handout 3.1 By: James T Saw 2000 GESTALT THEORY Gestalt is a general description for the concepts that make unity and variety possible in design. It is a German word that roughly translates as "whole" or "form." Gestalt theory is involved with visual perception and the psychology of art among other things. It is concerned with the relationship between the parts and the whole of a composition. In this section you will study five gestalt concepts: Closure the mind supplies the missing pieces in a composition Continuance the eye continues in the direction it is going Similarity what an items looks like and how that effects gestalt Proximity where items are in relationship to each other and how that effects gestalt Alignment lining up objects to organize and form groups GESTALT The objective of The study of gestalt originated in Germany in the 1920s. It is a studying gestalt is form of psychology that is interested in higher order cognitive to put the designer processes relative to behaviorism. The aspects of gestalt theory in control of what that interests designers are related to gestalt's investigations of the viewers see visual perception, principally the relationship between the parts when they look at a and the whole of visual experience. composition. The visual world is so complex that the mind has developed Gestalt theory strategies for coping with the confusion. The mind tries to find holds that the the simplest solution to a problem. One of the ways it does this whole is more than is to form groups of items that have certain characteristics in the sum of its parts. common. Most of what you will study about gestalt is concerned with how these groups are formed and what effect they have on perception. The stronger the grouping, the stronger the gestalt. It is this grouping that contributes to the unity in a design. Gestalt is one of the most powerful tools available to a designer for creating unity.
  • 90. The same concepts that form groups can be reversed to ungroup items -- to make them look unique and stand alone. That is the basis for creating variety. Variety is what adds interest to an image. The trick is to strike a balance between unity and variety. Too much unity and the design can look boring and repetitive; too much variety and it can look chaotic and disconnected. Understanding gestalt concepts can help a designer control unity and variety. CLOSURE A complex object is really a group of simple items that the mind puts together as a single entity. A face is a collection of eyes, ears, nose, mouth, etc. You can recognize a familiar face even if part of it hidden (with a hat or sunglasses for instance). Your mind supplies the missing parts if enough of the significant features are visible. A simple example of this can be seen with this series of circles. As more and more of each is removed the circle still remains identifiable until more is missing than is present. This is called closure because the mind "closes" the image by supplying the missing parts. This works with a simple geometric shape because you need only a few clues to remind you of the shape. More complex objects require more careful consideration as to what can and cannot be removed. Some information is critical and must be included; some information is unessential and can (and perhaps should) be eliminated. Closure is used extensively in art. It is not so much the quantity, but rather the quality of the information that lets you read an image. A clever artist leaves some things for the viewers to supply when they look at an image. It is a little like when the singer at a concert gets the audience to sing along. You feel like part of the show. CONTINUANCE Continuance describes a device for directing the viewer's
  • 91. attention when looking at a composition. It is based on the idea that once you start looking in a particular direction you will continue looking in that direction until you see something significant. A simple example of this is illustrated. You notice the small circle that the hand points at in preference to the closer, larger circle. In a sense this is a kind of closure -- a grouping of disconnected items by momentum. This feature is built into typography since we are taught to read left to right in our culture. Once you start reading you will continue across a gap to ............the next words. All kinds of pointing devices are used in design. Many of these are more subtle than a pointing hand or arrow: Eye direction: If the subject of a composition is looking in a particular direction, you will look to see what they are looking at. It is an old trick to look up into the sky and see how many other will look with you. Paths: Rivers, roads, railroad tracks and rows of trees or telephone poles are just a few of the devices that artists have used to lead viewers to particular places in their compositions. Perspective: Lines of perspective, like paths, can be used to direct attention to a focal point in a composition. You will study perspective in a few weeks when you study the design element space. Leonardo de Vinci used some of these devices in his mural "The Last Supper." Notice how you look from one apostle to another because of the way they are looking at each other, but finally end up looking at Jesus. The building they are in uses one point linear perspective to also focus you on the central figure of Jesus. SIMILARITY and PROXIMITY Similarity and proximity are two of the four grouping concepts in classic gestalt theory (the other two are closure and simplicity). Similarity refers to what items look like and how that effects grouping. Proximity refers
  • 92. to where items are and how that effects grouping. ALIGNMENT Alignment is an extension of proximity. It has to do with placing items so that they line up. Alignment is a concept that produces both grouping and organizes information to create order. Group Assignment: 1.What do you feel is the most important GESTALT concept in design and why? 2. The Gestalt Theory originated in the 1920s before the technology of today was born. Do you feel that the Gestalt principles are still relevant today and why? 3. This article used The Last Supper as an example of Continuance/Perspective. Is there any other GESTALT concept in this painting? 4. Can you name another piece of artwork or common graphic that the GESTALT concepts are present in?
  • 93. Unit 5: Activity 4.2: Creating Your Identity Concept: You will be developing a logo to represent you. Keep it simple and professional. Remember to create something that reflects you and your work. Procedure: 1. Try to download brushes or fonts from any free site. (Examples: 1001freefonts.com, obsidiandawn.com) 2. Analyze/Design: Think about who you are, Choose a color scheme, Choose fonts, Choose a theme Tips • Research and Ideation: Analyze and define what you are trying to represent. Develop a list of attributes of characteristics that best represent your goals. • Design Development: Turn your ideas into form. Think of ways to visually represent the most important attributes using colors, symbols, typography and icons. • Final Execution: Distill your ideas and forms into one clear concept. Apply final touches and prepare your logo for the public eye. 3. Develop: Create a logo design and accompanying business cards, letterhead, envelope, CD design and Business card fr/bk in Adobe Photoshop. (This lab is designed to get you further acquainted with ‘Photoshop’.) Procedure: 1. Logo 2. Letterhead 3. Envelope 4. CD Design 5. Business Card fr/bk 6. Save all as PSDs to your Z/Flash for your own records 7. Print all for the instructor to evaluate. Sizes: Letterhead: 8.5 x 11, Envelope 8.75 x 4, CD 5x5, Business Card 3.5x2 all at 300dpi
  • 94. Unit 5: Activity 4.4: Create a Design Sheet Concept: Part of the planning process for any multimedia project is a Design Sheet. Design Sheets are a base point for the designer to begin by arranging their color scheme in a series of blocks, lay out their fonts and any consistent graphics or shapes. Below is an example of a Design Sheet used for this curriculum. Procedure: Create a Design Sheet in Photoshop including your fonts, color and graphics. This will be used as a reference point next week.
  • 95. Unit 5: Course Project Part II: Assembling the Portfolio Introduction: While assembling your multimedia portfolio you need to determine and state your purpose to your audience. A single portfolio contains several components. Your portfolio should introduce you and any major themes around which your portfolio is constructed. In this assignment, you will collect all relevant and important pieces of your work that you think should be included in your Multimedia Portfolio. TASKS: 1. Collate all the mentioned documents, samples and pieces of work related to Multimedia that you may have created and collected till date. Your work pieces may include: ○ Your Resume ○ An Artist Statement ○ Your Work Samples ○ Proof of Certifications ○ Degrees/diplomas ○ Thank you letters and letters of recommendation ○ Other writing/content samples ○ Technical Skill Sets ○ Academic Plans of Study ○ List of References ○ Documented Accomplishments ○ Documented Professional Affiliations Deliverable: Prepare your Multimedia Portfolio and present both a hardcopy and an electronic portfolio to faculty during Unit 9. Label everything appropriately.
  • 96. Unit 6: Stage Develop I CONCEPT This unit begins 3 weeks of development. Students will be utilizing class time to compile their portfolio. Remind them that they may need extra time outside of class and they should dedicate the next three weeks to producing this important element that will reflect their life’s work. OBJECTIVES 1. Class Overview 1.1. Schedule 2. Discuss Developing the Portfolio 2.1. Get to it! 2.2. Explain your work 2.3. Choose carefully 2.4. Wrappers should be easy to open 2.5. Design for a Freelancer 3. Utilize the Design Sheet 3.1. Create graphics for the template. 3.2. Begin creating the template based on your storyboards and Table of Contents 3.3. Create a soundtrack 3.4. Use the Table of Contents REFERENCES ○ http://www.digital-web.com/articles/the_perfect_portfolio/ ○ http://www.mariusroosendaal.com/ ○ http://www.markwieman.com/ ○ http://www.davidloop.com/ ○ http://www.trevorsaint.com/testimonials/ ○ http://www.trevorberg.com/ ○ http://www.artworking.co.uk/ ○ http://cssremix.com/ ○ http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2008/03/04/creating-a-successful-online-portfolio/
  • 97. ○ http://www.webdesignerwall.com/ Also encourage them to explore the electronic books available. To enable them, discuss key words that should be used. METHODOLOGY Unit 6: Stage Develop I Resources for this Unit Activity Type of Resource Resource 3.0 Worksheet Worksheet 3.0: Starting Up your Portfolio KEY CONCEPTS TO BE COVERED IN CLASS A. Discuss Developing the Portfolio B. Utilize the Design Sheet TEACHING TIPS FOR THIS UNIT Unit 6 guides the students in starting to produce their portfolio. The next 3 weeks will mainly consist of in class work time to work on their portfolios with guidance. You may also wish to walk around to view the progress and guide each student individually. If you know that a certain student is having difficulties in a medium you are not proficient in you may wish to invite in another Multimedia instructor to help guide the students as well. The teaching tips are provided for your reference. Please choose carefully according to your teaching style. 1. You may want to begin class with a brief recap of last week and refer to the schedule when explaining the objectives. This is a good exercise to start out each week and is a good example for organization. This also gives students a chance to see how far they have come and how far they have to go. 2. If someone needs to review a hundred portfolios, you can bet they will come up with some shortcuts to make fast decisions about their potential employee. Most multimedia applicants will get rejected without a portfolio. Employers cannot possibly visualize your skills through a piece of paper; that is why a portfolio for multimedia students is so important. You should remember that an employer will make their mind up within the first half-dozen pieces, so push the goods to the front. Create an opening animation featuring your best works or feature them nicely designed on your homepage. Multimedia employers are also generally suspicious of any web designer without a web site for themselves. This sort of contradicts your skills. If you have the skills, show them off first and foremost by spending the time to develop your own web site.
  • 98. Mark Wieman does a great job of taking you straight to his best work by having a featured case study on the homepage. http://www.markwieman.com/ 3. Design operates in context, and the business and work of design even more so. Who was the client? What was the brief? What problem was it solving? How did your work solve their needs? Giving information about a portfolio piece not only fills the viewer in on the job, but it gives you a chance to shine. While you don’t need to write an essay, giving some details will allow the employer to appreciate it not just on an aesthetic level, but on a practical client project level too. Another question to answer is what part you played in the project—did you do everything? If it was a website, did you build it as well as doing the design? Visit http://www.mariusroosendaal.com/ for a good example of this. For every piece he includes a short description of the work, which appears when you click the description icon. 4. As we’ve already mentioned, get your best pieces to the front. Take that a step further and ask yourself what the employer will be interested in seeing. If you know that an employer has a niche, cater to that niche. Most companies want to see your creativity inside the confines of a corporate job. 5. Make your wrapper easy to open. People with not much to do may enjoy exploring a portfolio and clicking on hard to find links to see tiny thumbnails of your work, but a busy potential employer will not. Make your portfolio fast, accessible and simple. If you want to show your interactive creativity, it’s best to do it in the portfolio, not on it. The two key concepts here are usability and showing the work properly. When it comes to showing work, make previews large, include links to websites, and avoid popping up dozens of new windows. Nothing is more frustrating than not being able to see a candidate’s work fully—and nothing is more likely to get you booted off the short list! David Loop has an ultra simple portfolio that no-one could go wrong with. The work is presented in large thumbnails and requires nothing more than scrolling down the page to view it all. http://www.davidloop.com/ 6. What of the freelance designer? Web portfolio represents a wonderful marketing tool; whether you meet a lead and refer them to your site, or they simply find you through Google, your site needs to seal the deal and win you the job. To frame your portfolio to a freelance lead, once again you need to ask yourself: what does this type of person want to see? Or better yet, what type of clients are you looking for? Not every lead knows what they want—even if they do, they may not know what they could have. Using your portfolio site to educate your clients about the services you offer and how
  • 99. they might benefit will demonstrate you know what you are talking about, while also helping them get a better grasp over how it all works. 7. Provide testimonials. It is an odd fact that while a lead might not trust your opinion of yourself, they will often trust a third-party’s. Having reassuring quotes from previous clients helps quell uncertainty. The best way to get a testimonial? Ask! Most clients are happy to provide a few words over email. Just remember to keep them short and to the point. Testimonials not only provide Include testimonials explaining how your services solved a client’s needs. reassurance, they can also serve as a way to educate leads on how your work can benefit a business. Trevor Saint has a very stylish testimonials page which holds four glowing quotes that really sell Saint as a designer. http://www.trevorsaint.com/testimonials/ 8. Who else have you worked with? Knowing who they will be joining on your client list can also help your leads make a decision. Testimonials do a good job of showing who else you have worked with, as does the portfolio itself, but you might also consider a page showing a client list, or even a rotating graphic on your homepage with some famous client brands. 9. Be Professional. You don’t need to be a corporate designer to act and look professional. Just make sure the copy on your site is well thought-out, that there are no spelling mistakes, your links all work, your design is polished, and that you’ve taken care to present yourself well. 10. List your services and explain what they are. A client who needs a simple logo job may not know that you can also help them brand their email and PowerPoint presentations as well. A page that explains what you can do is a great way to sell a potential client on your services. Trevor Berg does a good job of explaining what it is he does right up front on his homepage. http://www.trevorberg.com/ 11. Explain portfolio pieces and how they helped their respective clients. If you present your portfolio with explanations of what they are looking at, how the work solved the business needs of the client, and any other salient details, the viewer is much more likely to understand the value in your work. Remember that many leads won’t have a design background, and may not fully appreciate the work or the effect of good design. 12. Say how you help businesses. Explain how you can help the potential client achieve their business goals. Remember your leads are only interested in their own requirements—when they look through your site they are evaluating how you will help them meet those requirements. 13. Make it easy to contact you. If you’ve managed to win over your prospect to the point that they
  • 100. wish to contact you, then for heaven’s sake make it easy! A contact form is best as it avoids the need to even open up an email application, but a simple address will do just as well. Most commonly a lead will be contacting you to ask for a quote on a job, so it’s a good idea to explain what information they need to give you in order to get the ball rolling. 14. Make sure they have all the information they need. There is nothing more time consuming than communicating back and forth. The more information you can give a lead through your site, the quicker they can come to a decision. As a minimum, ensure that a lead can ascertain what services you provide, where you are located, and what type of work you do. Artworking provide lots of calls to action including a Get a Quote button right on the homepage. http://www.artworking.co.uk/ 15. So those are some considerations to help frame a portfolio, but the key thing to always bear in mind is that you must put yourself in your audience’s shoes. What do they want? What do they need to hear or see to realize that you are the designer for them? By ensuring your portfolio is communicating to the right person, you stand a better chance of winning the job you are after. SUGGESTED ACTIVITES, ASSIGNMENTS & DELIVERABLES Worksheet 3.0: Starting Up your Portfolio The students will be working on the starting elements of these portfolio in this exercise. Review the worksheet ‘Worksheet 3.0: Starting Up your Portfolio’ with the students. They have 2 hours to complete the assigned tasks and you may choose a method of review. You may wish for them to print screen shots, upload to an FTP or place into a general folder on the server that you can reach later on. Time: 2 hours GRADED ASSIGNMENTS Worksheet 3.0: Starting Up your Portfolio SUMMARY The unit’s lesson can be wrapped up at the end of class. Students should also be reminded of their homework. RUBRIC FOR GRADING STUDENTS Unit 1 Participation: Attendance Activity: Worksheet 3.0:
  • 101. and Participation Starting Up your Portfolio 1/4 Extremely tardy or left early, Did not turn in any Barely any participation, progress Lacked any attention 2/4 Less than timely attendance Completed most of the to and from class, General worksheet participation with all activities and interaction with other students (did what they had to do to get the job done, no extra effort), Lacked full attention 3/4 Generally timely attendance Worksheet mostly or fully to and from class, Average completed with some participation with all design style added, activities and interaction with utilized storyboard and other students, full attention design sheet for the most part 4/4 Timely attendance to and Worksheet thoroughly from class, Full participation completed, planned the with all activities and project out thoroughly interaction with other and has a solid template, students, full attention utilized storyboard and design sheet ITSE STANDARDS ADDRESSED 1. Creativity and Innovation 2. Critical Thinking, Problem solving and Decision Making 3. Digital Citizenship 4. Technology Operations and Concepts HOMEWORK Complete the portfolio template for review next week.
  • 102. Unit 6: Worksheet 3.0: Starting Up Your Portfolio Concept: It is finally time to start up your portfolio! This worksheet will help you start it up by developing a template first to work from. 1. Create Graphics for the Template A great place to start when developing a portfolio is to begin with the graphics. These graphics will make up the backgrounds, banners and logo portions of your template. Procedure: 1. Before you begin you should make a list of everything that will need to be created in order to begin developing your portfolio. 2. Create a folder on your computer to house all of your files, including your color sheet and logo. 3. Last week you developed a logo and a design sheet. Open both of those up in Photoshop. This will both serve as a reference. You will be able to color pick off of the design sheet and compare your current graphics to your logo to make sure everything is unified. 4. You may wish to also make swatches with your color scheme. 5. Begin to create the items on your list. You may involve other software programs in the creation of these items. Remember to save everything to your folder that you have set up for yourself. 2. Create the Template The second thing you will do is begin to create the template for your portfolio. Some programs like Flash, Director and Premiere Pro work with a timeline and it may not seem efficient to move things around later on, but it will save you time in the long run. Creating a template will help you with the design, navigation and prototype testing. Procedure: 1. You will be using and implementing your Table of Contents and Storyboards, so have that up as you are working on the other items. 2. You may wish to create an intro animation or an intro page. It should be a vibrant welcome and preview the portfolio in some way. Or you may wish to get viewers straight to the point…. 3. You will want to plan out your navigation as best as possible. You may wish to create an outline of hierarchy detailing all the branches that the visitors can take. 4. Create your navigation system. You should use your Table of Contents as your navigation options. 5. Create each page, even if it’s blank. Use your Storyboards as a reference. This is so that you can link your navigation options to each page. Place your navigation buttons on each page. You may wish to use a ‘Master slide’ or a ‘template’ in order to simply apply the buttons to all the pages. 6. Place your graphics and log on each page.
  • 103. 7. Link your navigation options to each page. 3. Create the Soundtrack Music can accompany the viewer or detract from the real purpose. If you plan on including music in any part of your portfolio, you will have to plan it out really well. Procedure: 1. Select the file format compatible with your program of choice. 2. Select your music wisely. You want ambient music not something that initially scares the viewer off. Try to stay away from really hard, loud music. 3. You may have to convert the file format using a converter. 4. Place all your music in your folder for use later on. 5. You may wish to use a Freeshare product like ‘Audacity’ to cut and combine music. 4. Submit Your Progress to the Instructor
  • 104. Unit 7: Stage Develop II CONCEPT This unit continues the 3 weeks of development. Students will be utilizing class time to compile their portfolio. Remind them that they may need extra time outside of class and they should dedicate the next three weeks to producing this important element that will reflect their life’s work. OBJECTIVES 1. Class Overview 1.1. Schedule 2. Continue to Develop the Portfolio 2.1. Using Grids and Guides 2.2. Consider using multiple portfolios. 2.3. Utilizing the Right Technology 2.4. Easy to find contact information 2.5. Evaluate your portfolio REFERENCES ○ http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2008/03/04/creating-a-successful-online-portfolio/ ○ http://www.colourlovers.com ○ http://www.1001freefonts.com ○http://www.uwstout.edu/art/artedportfolios/creatingyour/gettingstarted.html Also encourage them to explore the electronic books available. To enable them, discuss key words that should be used. METHODOLOGY Unit 7: Stage Develop II Resources for this Unit Activity Type of Resource Resource 2.5 Worksheet Activity2.5 Portfolio Formative Evaluation Rubric
  • 105. KEY CONCEPTS TO BE COVERED IN CLASS A. Continue to Develop the Portfolio TEACHING TIPS FOR THIS UNIT Unit 7 allows student to continue their portfolio progress. The next 2 weeks will mainly consist of in class work time to work on their portfolios with guidance. You may also wish to walk around to view the progress and guide each student individually. If you know that a certain student is having difficulties in a medium you are not proficient in you may wish to invite in another Multimedia instructor to help guide the students as well. The teaching tips are provided for your reference. Please choose carefully according to your teaching style. 1. You may want to begin class with a brief recap of last week and refer to the schedule when explaining the objectives. This is a good exercise to start out each week and is a good example for organization. This also gives students a chance to see how far they have come and how far they have to go. 2. Remind students that Grids and Guides are so important when creating your portfolio and they can help arrange things nicely on the page. The main idea behind grid-based designs is a solid visual and structural balance of web-sites you can create with them. Sophisticated layout structures offer more flexibility and enhance the visual experience of visitors. In fact, users can easier follow the consistency of the page, while developers can update the layout in a well thought-out, consistent way. You may find some more guidance here: http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2007/04/14/designing-with-grid-based-approach/ If you are looking for inspiration for grid and column design, here is a nice collection of 32 column-based websites. http://www.webdesignerwall.com/trends/grid-and-column- designs/ 3. There are multiple reasons to have more than one portfolio. You may have more than one skill set that you would like to promote separately. You may want to create a portfolio that is targeted to landing a specific job and send it to a marketing director at a company. They’ll appreciate that. It saves them time and shows you really want the job. Even if its a one page portfolio. Even if you are filling the portfolio with the same work you will still benefit by having multiple portfolios within different groups online. Take the case of Nik Ainley, a UK-based designer and illustrator. He has multiple portfolios that all serve complimentary goals. He chose to participate in multiple portfolio-based communities to build his reputation and network with other designers. His website Shiny Binary has received over 1 million visitors. http://www.shinybinary.com/art.html He has a Portfolio on Behance. He’s involved in numerous groups there and has a large Inner Circle. And it prominently displays that he is available for Freelancing, Long-Term
  • 106. Contract, Full-Time Hire, or Consulting work. http://www.behance.net/shinybinary Nick has a very popular Portfolio on DeviantArt. He’s been a member there since 2004. He has over 80 Portfolio pieces and over 1,000 comments on his work there. He has a lot of fans that have his works marked as favorites. http://shinybinary.deviantart.com/ Nik Ainley shows how you can benefit from having multiple portfolios online even when the work you are showcasing is similar in each portfolio. That is because you are taping into a different community with each portfolio you create. You’re meeting people, exposing them to your work, and making new connections by placing your portfolio within different communities. 4. If there are technologies inherent in your job description then it may make sense to build your portfolio with that technology. Sure Flash is cool, but is it right for your website. Probably not if you’re a logo designer. Though if you’re trying to land a job as a Flash Designer at a top notch Interactive Design Agency like Story Worldwide than its the right choice. The New Media Designer Portfolio of Mathew V. Robinson presents an easy to use navigation. Essential to the success of a Flash site, it’s fast loading. His portfolio is highly usable and looks great. http://www.matthewvrobinson.com/ Consider maintainability when deciding on technologies. Simplifying your portfolio as much as possible will ease the time you’ll have to spend on upgrading or making changes to the website. You should consider how easy it is to add and remove portfolio pieces. The easier it is the more likely it is you’ll update your portfolio on a regular basis. 5. Contact information should be easy to find and in the case of contact forms they should be easy to use. Prominently place this kind of information. 6. Infuse your personality into your design. Nick La has a portfolio design that shows his design style and interests. The unique background illustration stands out. It doesn’t interfere with the usability of the site, but it gives it a beautiful wrapper. For some this would be to much and interfere with the work being presented. Though the work presented in his portfolio works fine. He sets the portfolio pieces against a solid white background in a strong column-based design. The work presented fits with the style of the sites background illustration. Pulling off this kind of personal infusion into the design of your site is difficult to achieve. Doing this well makes your portfolio not only memorable but remarkable! Nick La achieved tremendous success with his portfolio for N.design Studio. Being remarkable in the design of your portfolio often means bringing to fruition the personal design taste unique to you that has been cultivated over the years. http://www.ndesign-studio.com/portfolio
  • 107. 7. Leverage your work. There are many techniques for promoting your portfolio. Consider joining professional online communities and networking with other community members. We’ve already looked at some communities that you can place a portfolio on. Place a thread in a design forum about your portfolio. Submit your design to gallery websites. Almost any technique that can be used to promote a website can be used to promote your portfolio. Add a blog to your website. The more traffic you can pull to your website the more exposure your portfolio will receive. Dan Cederholm was an early adopter of this technique and achieved fame with his blog Simple bits. His portfolio resides successfully on the same site.http://simplebits.com/ Leveraging your work involves linking to it when you send emails. Include a link to your portfolio site in your Facebook profile or any other community you belong to. Infuse your portfolio site within your communications and your online identity. 8. It always helps to have a view toward the future. Your portfolio needs are likely to change many times as you develop different projects over the course of your career. Putting it all together: a successful portfolio finds that perfect blend of your personality, prominence of work, simplicity, and ease of use that makes your portfolio stand out from the crowd and achieve your goals. SUGGESTED ACTIVITES, ASSIGNMENTS & DELIVERABLES Lab 2.0 Continue to Build the Portfolio. Students should continue to build their portfolios during this unit. You may also wish to walk around to view the progress and guide each student individually. If you know that a certain student is having difficulties in a medium you are not proficient in you may wish to invite in another Multimedia instructor to help guide the students as well. The students should be focusing on adding in the elements. You may also wish students to join up with their teams to get extra feedback on the progress and test their template navigation. Time: 3 hours Activity 2.5 Portfolio Formative Evaluation Rubric It is very important to conduct formative evaluations while developing your portfolio. This will help you keep track of your progress and keep you focused. This activity will help them reflect on their progress thus far and see what they have to wrap up next week. The Activity 2.5 Portfolio Formative Evaluation Rubric worksheet should be handed out the last 20 minutes of class.
  • 108. Time: 20 minutes GRADED ASSIGNMENTS Activity 2.5 Portfolio Formative Evaluation Rubric SUMMARY The unit’s lesson can be wrapped up at the end of class. Students should also be reminded of their homework. RUBRIC FOR GRADING STUDENTS Unit 1 Participation: Attendance Activity: Activity2.5 and Participation Portfolio Formative Evaluation Rubric 1/4 Extremely tardy or left early, Did not turn in any Barely any participation, progress or rubric Lacked any attention 2/4 Less than timely attendance Had little progress to and from class, General participation with all activities and interaction with other students (did what they had to do to get the job done, no extra effort), Lacked full attention 3/4 Generally timely attendance Added a few elements to to and from class, Average the portfolio, continued participation with all to improve the design and activities and interaction with completed the evaluation other students, full attention with little feedback. for the most part 4/4 Timely attendance to and Added most of the from class, Full participation elements to the portfolio, with all activities and improved functionality, interaction with other continued to improve the students, full attention design and completed the evaluation with a lot of feedback. ITSE STANDARDS ADDRESSED 1. Creativity and Innovation 2. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving and Decision Making
  • 109. 3. Digital Citizenship 4. Technology Operations and Concepts HOMEWORK Continue to work on and add to their portfolio. Print a few business cards for the interviews.
  • 110. Unit 7: Activity 2.5: PORTFOLIO FORMATIVE EVALUATION RUBRIC Concept: It is very important to conduct formative evaluations while developing your portfolio. This will help you keep track of your progress and keep you focused. PORTFOLIO EVALUATION RUBRIC This is a general rubric that can be used to evaluate your in-progress as well as your final portfolios. This rubric is best utilized with self-created portfolios and not institutional e- Portfolios CRITERIA POOR GOOD EXCELLENT (1) (2) (3) TECHNICAL Hard to navigate; Navigation is clear; Clear navigation; links many links do not some links do not work; content includes work; all text docs work; content audio/video, digital with few images; includes images, slide show, audio/or video not audio/video, digital and/or PDF docs; included; images, slide show, documents are error-free; documents have and/or PDF docs; portfolio has been many grammatical few grammar errors converted to CD or errors in documents posted to a web site. DESIGN Not organized or Organized; some Well organized; presented well; lacks evidence of unique/imaginative personalization; not personalization; is approach to design; highly visual; poor use of visual; good use of visual; excellent use of design, audio, text design, audio, and design, audio, and text elements text elements elements *REFLECTIONS Reflections not Reflections are Reflections are learly related to artifacts; related to artifacts; related to artifacts; many reflections some reflections reflections demonstrate missing and/or need missing/and or need growth over time; substantial of improvement and reflections are well written improvement and revisions; reflections and reveal depth and revisions; reflections overall are of good breadth of experiences; overall are of poor quality reflections overall ar of quality excellent quality
  • 111. ARTIFACTS Artifacts are not Artifacts related to Artifacts are related to related to reflections; some reflections; no artifacts reflections; many artifacts missing; has missing; categories are artifacts missing; a variety of artifacts complete; good variety of little variety of included; good artifacts included; artifacts included; quality digital excellent quality digital poor quality digital and/or video images and/or video images and and/or video images & sound sound and sound Total up your scores and reflect on your progress: Technical Score: Reflections: Design Score: Reflections: Reflections Score: Reflections: Artifacts Score: Reflections:
  • 112. Unit 8: Stage Develop III CONCEPT This unit continues the 3 weeks of development. Students will be utilizing class time to compile their portfolio. Remind them that they may need extra time outside of class and they should dedicate the next three weeks to producing this important element that will reflect their life’s work. OBJECTIVES 1. Class Overview 1.1. Schedule 2. Finish Your Portfolio 2.1. Include a Career Items Option 2.2. Prepare for the Presentation 2.3. Evaluate your portfolio 2.4. Easy Portfolio Projects REFERENCES ○ http://www.toucher.co.uk/portfolio.htm ○ http://www.veen.com/jeff/archives/000935.html ○ http://desktoppub.about.com/od/portfolios/a/portfolio_stuff.htm ○ http://www.aiga.org/content.cfm/portfolio-presenting Also encourage them to explore the electronic books available. To enable them, discuss key words that should be used. METHODOLOGY Unit 8: Stage Develop III Resources for this Unit Activity Type of Resource Resource 2.5 Worksheet Activity2.5 Portfolio Formative Evaluation Rubric
  • 113. KEY CONCEPTS TO BE COVERED IN CLASS A. Finish Your Portfolio TEACHING TIPS FOR THIS UNIT Unit 8 wraps up the portfolio process. This week will mainly consist of in class work time to work on their portfolios with guidance. You may also wish to walk around to view the progress and guide each student individually. If you know that a certain student is having difficulties in a medium you are not proficient in you may wish to invite in another Multimedia instructor to help guide the students as well. The teaching tips are provided for your reference. Please choose carefully according to your teaching style. 1. You may want to begin class with a brief recap of last week and refer to the schedule when explaining the objectives. This is a good exercise to start out each week and is a good example for organization. This also gives students a chance to see how far they have come and how far they have to go. 2. It is important to include a career items option in your portfolio, one of your requirements for this portfolio project. Some employers may not only want to see your abilities but also that you’re responsible. A ‘career option’ in your portfolio will help get them to the facts: letters of recommendation, your resume, your curriculum vitae, your artist statement and your technical skills. 3. Presenting your portfolio can be nerve-wracking. You may want to start this discussion with the awesome story of first time interviewing by Steff Geissbuhler at http://www.aiga.org/content.cfm/portfolio-presenting. 4. First things first. You must get your portfolio through the door. When applying send a letter and a well-designed resume in advance. You may also want to include a preview to your full portfolio or a link to your e-portfolio. Follow this up with a phone call and make an appointment. Call that day to confirm that you still have an interview and the time. Brush up on the firm or company’s work before you go in. They will ask you “what do you know about us” and you should answer in a way that suggests that you chose them because you felt you would fit into their team. 5. It helps to label your work with very short descriptions, in case you have to drop off your portfolio and don’t have a chance to narrate in person. Keep in mind that a first portfolio review gives the interviewer only a first impression of you and your work. If they’re interested, you will be called back and you and your work will be scrutinized in more detail. 6. Your digital portfolio should be designed just like the regular portfolio with the same attributes described above. It should be easy to open, navigate and review. Whatever you
  • 114. do, don’t make them work at it. Make it easy to get to your information. Remember, it is much easier to ignore or delete your email than it is to print it out and keep it on record. Think about other forms of communication. 7. For the most part, employers want to meet you in person. It’s not the work they are buying, it is you they are interested in. They want to hear and see you present you work. Your intelligent, enthusiasm, energy and passion are usually more important that your whole portfolio. Often times, employers will criticize your work in a constructive way. They want to find out how much involvement you had in each project. Usually the criticism is more or less geared at the faculty that taught you. You must learn how to stay cool and confident under pressure. Employers will use different interviewing methods to figure out your reactions in certain situations. Dress presentably. Speak up and narrate your work. Don’t just sit there and wait for questions or comments. Be self critical. It is a useful trait when an employee can evaluate their own work, a trait that is often overlooked. Most of all speak how you feel, if you love and life this profession with a passion, it should show. 8. If student still feel like they are lacking in a certain design area, you may wish to point them to about.com’s Portfolio page by Jacci Howard Bear. http://desktoppub.about.com/od/portfolios/a/portfolio_stuff.htm This page is filled with short assignments that may help them add to the areas they are lacking in. SUGGESTED ACTIVITES, ASSIGNMENTS & DELIVERABLES Lab 2.0 Finish the Portfolio. Students should continue to build their portfolios during this unit. You may also wish to walk around to view the progress and guide each student individually. If you know that a certain student is having difficulties in a medium you are not proficient in you may wish to invite in another Multimedia instructor to help guide the students as well. The students should be focusing on adding in the elements. Time: 3 hours Activity 2.3 Team Evaluation Students should join their teams towards the end of class to get their feedback on their nearing-end portfolio. It is important that students evaluate each other and participate in this reflective activity. Time: 20 minutes
  • 115. Activity 2.3 Portfolio Formative Evaluation Rubric It is very important to conduct formative evaluations while developing your portfolio. This will help you keep track of your progress and keep you focused. This activity will help them reflect on their progress thus far and see what they have to wrap up next week. The Activity 2.5 Portfolio Formative Evaluation Rubric worksheet should be handed out the last 20 minutes of class. Time: 20 minutes GRADED ASSIGNMENTS Activity 2.5 Portfolio Formative Evaluation Rubric SUMMARY The unit’s lesson can be wrapped up at the end of class. Students should also be reminded of their homework. RUBRIC FOR GRADING STUDENTS Unit 1 Participation: Attendance Activity: Activity2.5 and Participation Portfolio Formative Evaluation Rubric 1/4 Extremely tardy or left early, Did not turn in any Barely any participation, progress or rubric Lacked any attention 2/4 Less than timely attendance Had little progress to and from class, General participation with all activities and interaction with other students (did what they had to do to get the job done, no extra effort), Lacked full attention 3/4 Generally timely attendance Added a few elements to to and from class, Average the portfolio, continued participation with all to improve the design and activities and interaction with completed the evaluation other students, full attention with little feedback. for the most part 4/4 Timely attendance to and Added most of the from class, Full participation elements to the portfolio, with all activities and improved functionality, interaction with other continued to improve the students, full attention design and completed the evaluation with a lot of
  • 116. feedback. ITSE STANDARDS ADDRESSED 1. Creativity and Innovation 2. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving and Decision Making 3. Digital Citizenship 4. Technology Operations and Concepts HOMEWORK Finalize their Portfolio, choose their outfit and prepare to present their projects next week.
  • 117. Unit 8: Activity 2.5: PORTFOLIO FORMATIVE EVALUATION RUBRIC Concept: It is very important to conduct formative evaluations while developing your portfolio. This will help you keep track of your progress and keep you focused. PORTFOLIO EVALUATION RUBRIC This is a general rubric that can be used to evaluate your in-progress as well as your final portfolios. This rubric is best utilized with self-created portfolios and not institutional e- Portfolios CRITERIA POOR GOOD EXCELLENT (1) (2) (3) TECHNICAL Hard to navigate; Navigation is clear; Clear navigation; links many links do not some links do not work; content includes work; all text docs work; content audio/video, digital with few images; includes images, slide show, audio/or video not audio/video, digital and/or PDF docs; included; images, slide show, documents are error-free; documents have and/or PDF docs; portfolio has been many grammatical few grammar errors converted to CD or errors in documents posted to a web site. DESIGN Not organized or Organized; some Well organized; presented well; lacks evidence of unique/imaginative personalization; not personalization; is approach to design; highly visual; poor use of visual; good use of visual; excellent use of design, audio, text design, audio, and design, audio, and text elements text elements elements *REFLECTIONS Reflections not Reflections are Reflections are learly related to artifacts; related to artifacts; related to artifacts; many reflections some reflections reflections demonstrate missing and/or need missing/and or need growth over time; substantial of improvement and reflections are well written improvement and revisions; reflections and reveal depth and revisions; reflections overall are of good breadth of experiences; overall are of poor quality reflections overall ar of quality excellent quality
  • 118. ARTIFACTS Artifacts are not Artifacts related to Artifacts are related to related to reflections; some reflections; no artifacts reflections; many artifacts missing; has missing; categories are artifacts missing; a variety of artifacts complete; good variety of little variety of included; good artifacts included; artifacts included; quality digital excellent quality digital poor quality digital and/or video images and/or video images and and/or video images & sound sound and sound Total up your scores and reflect on your progress: Technical Score: Reflections: Design Score: Reflections: Reflections Score: Reflections: Artifacts Score: Reflections:
  • 119. Unit 9: Stage Implement CONCEPT Stage Implement is a unit that focuses on feedback and getting the student acquainted with presenting their project. OBJECTIVES 1. Class Overview 1.1. Schedule 2. Presenting Your Portfolio 2.1. Students present portfolios to guests 2.2. Individual growth activity 2.3. Team Activity 3. Assign Project 3 REFERENCES ○ http://www.aiga.org/content.cfm/portfolio-presenting Also encourage them to explore the electronic books available. To enable them, discuss key words that should be used. METHODOLOGY Unit 9: Stage Implement Resources for this Unit Activity Type of Resource Resource 2.2 Worksheet Activity 2.2 Individual Growth Activity 3.0 Handout Course Project III: Final Presentation of the Multimedia Portfolio KEY CONCEPTS TO BE COVERED IN CLASS A. Presenting Your Portfolio B. Assign Project 3 TEACHING TIPS FOR THIS UNIT Stage Implement is a unit that focuses on feedback and getting the student acquainted with presenting their project.
  • 120. The teaching tips are provided for your reference. Please choose carefully according to your teaching style. 1. You may want to begin class with a brief recap of last week and refer to the schedule when explaining the objectives. This is a good exercise to start out each week and is a good example for organization. This also gives students a chance to see how far they have come and how far they have to go. 2. This unit will have to be planned in advance. Five members of the faculty, career services, administration and marketing should be invited in. (This number can vary with the number of students in each team). Potential members to ask are the Dean, the Director, the Multimedia Chair, other Multimedia instructors, Career Services and members of Marketing. These guests should provide feedback on the student’s resume, hardcopy portfolio and electronic portfolio. They should also give them feedback on their interviewing skills. 3. You may want to have each student tell the interviewer what position they are applying for so that they can take that standpoint and ask appropriate questions. 4. Procedure: Teams will be working on a group activity, while interviews are happening with another team. Individuals from a Team will meet with three guests, 10 minutes each. You will have to plan how this will take place. Will the guests visit the students or will the students meet with each guest? Each student will need access to a computer to show off their work. Should this be conducted in a different room? 5. You may also want Career Services to stick around after the interviews to give everyone some interviewing tips. The previous exercise was great for practice, but students will have to spruce up their skills for Unit 11. Ask Career Services to also touch base on company research what to wear for the interview, compile all the needed materials in advance, and questions they might want to ask during an interview. SUGGESTED ACTIVITES, ASSIGNMENTS & DELIVERABLES Lab 2.1 Presenting their Portfolio Teams will be working on a group activity, while interviews are happening with another team. Individuals from a Team will meet with three guests, 10 minutes each. You will have to plan how this will take place. Will the guests visit the students or will the students meet with each guest? Each student will need access to a computer to show off their work. Should this be conducted in a different room? Time: 3 hours Activity 2.2 Individual Growth Activity Have students fill out the worksheet in full depth and make a star next to the questions they found the hardest to answer. You may wish to answer any questions about the answers
  • 121. by visiting this web site: http://bhuvans.wordpress.com/2006/08/19/50-common- interview-qa/. Time: roughly 2 hours Activity 2.3 Mock Interview Practice This activity should take place after the students have filled out their Activity 2.2 worksheet. Put your students back into their teams. Each team member must pose 5-7 questions (possibly the ones they starred) off of the worksheet. Each student should state and justify their response to the questions. Students should be working together as a team to come up with answers and share ideas. Time: 1 hour Handout 3.0 Course Project III: Final Presentation of the Multimedia Portfolio Congratulate the students for completing today’s interviews and encourage them to make revisions based on the suggestions made. Remind them no portfolio is done on the first try, it may takes years to master. Review the Final Presentation Process and the Course Project III: Final Presentation of the Multimedia Portfolio handout. Answer questions any questions they may have. Time 10 minutes GRADED ASSIGNMENTS Activity 2.2 Individual Growth Activity SUMMARY The unit’s lesson can be wrapped up at the end of class. Students should also be reminded of their homework. RUBRIC FOR GRADING STUDENTS Unit 1 Participation: Attendance Activity: Activity 2.2 and Participation Individual Growth Activity 1/4 Extremely tardy or left early, Student did not fill out Barely any participation, the worksheet Lacked any attention 2/4 Less than timely attendance Student filled out the to and from class, General worksheet with vague participation with all answers and had missing activities and interaction with questions other students (did what they had to do to get the job done, no extra effort), Lacked full attention
  • 122. 3/4 Generally timely attendance Student filled out all the to and from class, Average questions with short participation with all answers activities and interaction with other students, full attention for the most part 4/4 Timely attendance to and Student filled out all the from class, Full participation questions with thorough with all activities and answers. interaction with other students, full attention ITSE STANDARDS ADDRESSED 1. Creativity and Innovation 2. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving and Decision Making HOMEWORK Revise your Portfolio based on suggestions made today.
  • 123. Unit 9: Activity 2.2: INDIVIDUAL GROWTH ACTIVITY Concept: It is very important to think about the important questions you will be asked during an interview. Read the statements and questions below. Describe how you would answer that questions and why you concluded that. Make a star next to the questions they found the hardest to answer. 1. Tell me about yourself: 2. Why did you leave your last job? 3. What experience do you have in this field? 4. Do you consider yourself successful? 5. What do co-workers say about you? 6. What do you know about this organization? 7. What have you done to improve your knowledge in the last year? 8. Are you applying for other jobs? 9. Why do you want to work for this organization? 10. Do you know anyone who works for us?
  • 124. 11. What kind of salary do you need? 12. Are you a team player? 13. How long would you expect to work for us if hired? 14. Have you ever had to fire anyone? How did you feel about that? 15. What is your philosophy towards work? 16. If you had enough money to retire right now, would you? 17. Have you ever been asked to leave a position? 18. Explain how you would be an asset to this organization 19. Why should we hire you? 20. Tell me about a suggestion you have made 21. What irritates you about co-workers? 22. What is your greatest strength? 23. Tell me about your dream job. 24. Why do you think you would do well at this job?
  • 125. 25. What are you looking for in a job? 26. What kind of person would you refuse to work with? 27. What is more important to you: the money or the work? 28. What would your previous supervisor say your strongest point is? 29. Tell me about a problem you had with a supervisor 30. What has disappointed you about a job? 31. Tell me about your ability to work under pressure. 32. Do your skills match this job or another job more closely? 33. What motivates you to do your best on the job? 34. Are you willing to work overtime? Nights? Weekends? 35. How would you know you were successful on this job? 36. Would you be willing to relocate if required? 37. Are you willing to put the interests of the organization ahead ofyour own? 38. Describe your management style.
  • 126. 39. What have you learned from mistakes on the job? 40. Do you have any blind spots? 41. If you were hiring a person for this job, what would you look for? 42. Do you think you are overqualified for this position? 43. How do you propose to compensate for your lack of experience? 44. What qualities do you look for in a boss? . 45. Tell me about a time when you helped resolve a dispute between others.. 46. What position do you prefer on a team working on a project? 47. Describe your work ethic. 48. What has been your biggest professional disappointment? 49. Tell me about the most fun you have had on the job. 50. Do you have any questions for me?
  • 127. Unit 9: Course Project Part III: Final Presentation of the Multimedia Portfolio Introduction: Your portfolio is a tool for life- your life and your career. This final presentation for the class and a panel of Professionals will promote you and give you the confidence to walk into any interview. TASKS: 1. Present your Multimedia Portfolio in class and a panel of Professionals who will ask you interview questions and critique your portfolio presentation. 2. Include your error free resume and bring copies for the class and panelists. 3. You will have to elaborate on these topics: ○ Why did you choose this format to present your portfolio? ○ What skills does your portfolio represent? ○ Is your portfolio employer friendly? ○ What type of positions are your targeting your portfolio at? ○ How competitive is your portfolio in the industry you are targeting? ○ What are your plans for furthering your portfolio? Deliverable: Prepare your revised Multimedia Portfolio and present both a hardcopy and an electronic portfolio to the class and panel of Professional Unit 11.
  • 128. Unit 10: Stage Evaluate CONCEPT Stage Evaluate gives students a chance to take a step back, take in all the suggestions from last week and make any changes they feel has to be made. OBJECTIVES 1. Class Overview 1.1. Schedule 2. The Final Evaluation 2.1. Summative Evaluation with the Instructor 2.2. Instructor and Student Conferences 2.3. Prepare for the Final Presentation 3. Getting a Winning Job 3.1. Closing an Interview with a Thank-You note 3.2. Negotiating a Salary REFERENCES ○ http://www.aiga.org/content.cfm/portfolio-presenting Also encourage them to explore the electronic books available. To enable them, discuss key words that should be used. METHODOLOGY Unit 10: Stage Evaluate Resources for this Unit Activity Type of Resource Resource n/a n/a n/a KEY CONCEPTS TO BE COVERED IN CLASS A. The Final Evaluation B. Getting a Winning Job TEACHING TIPS FOR THIS UNIT Stage Evaluate gives students a chance to take a step back, take in all the suggestions from last week and make any changes they feel has to be made.
  • 129. The teaching tips are provided for your reference. Please choose carefully according to your teaching style. 1. You may want to begin class with a brief recap of last week and refer to the schedule when explaining the objectives. This is a good exercise to start out each week and is a good example for organization. This also gives students a chance to see how far they have come and how far they have to go. 2. Express how important thank-you notes are after an interview and how they make individuals stand out. Compose a thank-you note on the white board. Have students participate in the activity by offering suggestions and phrases. Then have them critique the entire note. 3. Negotiating a Salary is very important. Students should be able to identify the salary range they are looking for depending on the job. They should also determine a strategy that works before them. 4. Set up time slots with students ahead of time. Go through a final summative evaluation with each student. Ask them about their process and how they feel about their final project. Go over their portfolios and review its contents with them. You may also want to suggest presentation ideas for each student. SUGGESTED ACTIVITES, ASSIGNMENTS & DELIVERABLES Lab 2.3 Preparing for the Final Presentation Students should wrap up their portfolios and prepare for the Final Presentation and finalizing Project III. Time: roughly 3 hours GRADED ASSIGNMENTS None this week SUMMARY The unit’s lesson can be wrapped up at the end of class. Students should also be reminded of their homework. RUBRIC FOR GRADING STUDENTS Unit 1 Participation: Attendance and Participation 1/4 Extremely tardy or left early, Barely any participation, Lacked any attention 2/4 Less than timely attendance
  • 130. to and from class, General participation with all activities and interaction with other students (did what they had to do to get the job done, no extra effort), Lacked full attention 3/4 Generally timely attendance to and from class, Average participation with all activities and interaction with other students, full attention for the most part 4/4 Timely attendance to and from class, Full participation with all activities and interaction with other students, full attention ITSE STANDARDS ADDRESSED 1. Creativity and Innovation 2. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving and Decision Making HOMEWORK Choose a professional outfit, prepare for the final presentation.
  • 131. Unit 11: The Portfolio Presentation CONCEPT This is the Final Presentation. OBJECTIVES 1. Class Overview 1.1. Schedule 2. The Final Presentation REFERENCES ○ http://www.aiga.org/content.cfm/portfolio-presenting Also encourage them to explore the electronic books available. To enable them, discuss key words that should be used. METHODOLOGY Unit 11: The Final Presentation Resources for this Unit Activity Type of Resource Resource n/a n/a n/a KEY CONCEPTS TO BE COVERED IN CLASS A. The Final Presentation TEACHING TIPS FOR THIS UNIT This is the Final Presentation. You may want to start the class out with an ice breaker to ease their nerves. The teaching tips are provided for your reference. Please choose carefully according to your teaching style. 1. You may want to begin class with a brief recap of last week and refer to the schedule when explaining the objectives. This is a good exercise to start out each week and is a good example for organization. This also gives students a chance to see how far they have come and how far they have to go.
  • 132. 2. This unit will have to be planned in advance. A panel of 3-5 Professionals should be invited in to critique the portfolios. Pass out one Portfolio Rubric for each student to each panel member. These guests should provide feedback on the student’s resume, hardcopy portfolio and electronic portfolio. They should give them feedback on their interviewing skills. They should also ask them standard interviewing questions that they ask. 3. Each student should be assigned a time. They should be on time to class and definitely on time for their presentation. SUGGESTED ACTIVITES, ASSIGNMENTS & DELIVERABLES The Final Presentation GRADED ASSIGNMENTS None this week SUMMARY Congratulations- you made it! RUBRIC FOR GRADING STUDENTS Unit 1 Participation: Attendance and Participation 1/4 Extremely tardy or left early, Barely any participation, Lacked any attention 2/4 Less than timely attendance to and from class, General participation with all activities and interaction with other students (did what they had to do to get the job done, no extra effort), Lacked full attention 3/4 Generally timely attendance to and from class, Average participation with all activities and interaction with other students, full attention for the most part 4/4 Timely attendance to and from class, Full participation
  • 133. with all activities and interaction with other students, full attention ITSE STANDARDS ADDRESSED 1. Creativity and Innovation 2. Communication and Collaboration 4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving and Decision Making 6. Technology Operations and Concepts HOMEWORK n/a
  • 134. Unit 11: PORTFOLIO RUBRIC Student Name: Evaluator’s Name: PORTFOLIO RUBRIC 4 3 2 1 Portfolio Portfolio Portfolio Portfolio contains all of contains most contains some of contains little of CONTENTS the required of the required the the required material. material. required material. material. CHOICE OF Samples show Samples show Samples show Random DOCUMENTATION student student progress some student Selection of progress and and some progress Sample knowledge knowledge and some Documents. No of Design of Design knowledge knowledge Principles Principles. of Design of Design Principles Principles displayed. ORGANIZATION Portfolio is Portfolio is well Portfolio is fairly Portfolio shows completely and organized. A well organized. some attempt at neatly organized. Reader has little A Reader may organization. A A Reader can difficulty have a little Reader has easily find finding things. difficulty finding difficulty finding things. things. things. MECHANICS There are no There are few Errors in Errors in errors in errors in spelling, spelling, spelling, spelling, punctuation or punctuation or punctuation or punctuation or grammar are grammar are grammar. grammar. evident. numerous. PERSONAL All Reflections Most of the Some of the Few of the REFLECTION include personal Reflections Reflections Reflections reactions that are include personal include personal include personal descriptive and reactions that reactions that reactions that are insightful and are descriptive are descriptive descriptive and relate to the and insightful and insightful insightful and stated principle. and relate to the and relate to the relate to the stated principle. stated principle. stated principle. PORTFOLIO Student spoke Student spoke Student spoke Student spoke PRESENTATION clearly, made relatively clearly, relatively clearly unclearly, appropriate eye made most of the seldom made contact with appropriate eye time, made eye appropriate eye audience and contact with contact with contact with confidently audience and audience and audience and answered answered was able to had difficulty questions. questions. answer some answering questions. questions. OVERALL The portfolio The portfolio The portfolio The portfolio
  • 135. PORTFOLIO demonstrates helps to does little to does not IMPACT well the student’s demonstrate the demonstrate the demonstrate the skills, abilities, student’s skills, student’s skills, student’s skills, and knowledge abilities, and abilities, and abilities, and to potential knowledge to knowledge to knowledge to employers. potential potential potential Student was employers. employers. employers. timely. Student was Student was not Student was not timely. timely. timely. Student Grade/4 CONTENTS CHOICE OF DOCUMENTATION ORGANIZATION MECHANICS PERSONAL REFLECTION PORTFOLIO PRESENTATION OVERALL PORTFOLIO IMPACT
  • 136. Instructional Strategies 1. Technology integration 2. Discussions that encourage student participation and responses 3. A clear structure with every class day such as Theory, Lab, Summary 4. Promote independent and group learning 5. Collaborative learning 6. Promote different methods of self-evaluation 7. Guest Speakers 8. Mentors 9. Professionals for the final Panel 10. Faculty and Staff
  • 137. Resources Individual Resources are mentioned for each Unit in that corresponding Unit’s Lesson Plan. Personal References: Articles: Creating digital portfolios. By: Oros, Larry, Morgenegg, Jeff Finger, Anthony, Media & Methods, 00256897, Jan/Feb98, Vol. 34, Issue 3 Websites: http://www.pegasuscharter.org/strategy/Planning/LessonHelpPage.htm http://portfolio.psu.edu/ http://electronicportfolios.org/portfolios/EPDevProcess.html#mmdev Books: Creating Digital Teaching Portfolio. By: Kilbane, Clare and Milman, Natalie Annotated Bibliographies Sciabarrasi, Leah Professor Skowronski EDU 670 11 February 2008
  • 138. Electronic Portfolios for Faculty Evaluation: An Annotated Bibliography Electronic Portfolios for Faculty Evaluation. (2005,NOV). Academic Leader, Vol. 21, Issue 11, 2-8. Tina Ashford was among the first faculty members at Macon State College to utilize an electronic portfolio when she had to support her bid for tenure. There were several advantages she felt that an electronic portfolio had over a traditional portfolio. She offered the following advantages and possible issues to the Academic Leader. The Electronic Portfolio is easily accessible, easy to update and an effective way to present multimedia content. It’s always available to add on to in order to keep it current. It can possibly prevent the irretrievable loss of paper files due to an unfortunate accident. Electronic portfolios can ensure that members of a committee will always have access to the portfolio, not just during business hours. It can also provide access to works in progress, testifying more proof than a text document. Written documents can describe the event, but an electronic portfolio will help viewers make a visual connection with the idea or creative arts presented. Multimedia content, such as website development, is easier to showcase in an
  • 139. electronic portfolio by providing access to the real web sites produced. Some issues that might want to be considered include how the portfolio will be restricted if it contains sensitive or private information. In order to reach a large audience, such as a college faculty, a file format has to be decided upon. Ashford encourages the concept of the portfolio but warns against anything standardized stating there needs to be a break-in period for learning. Training tools, such as demos and workshops, may also be needed to reach a wider audience. Sciabarrasi, Leah Professor Skowronski EDU 670 11 February 2008
  • 140. An Electronic Portfolio Journey: A Year Later: An Annotated Bibliography Chambers, S.,& Wickersham, L. (2007). An Electronic Portfolio Journey: A Year Later. Education, Issue 3 (Vol. 127), 351-360. Dr. Sharon M. Chambers and Dr. Leah E. Wickersham, both Associate Professors at Texas A&M University, conducted a follow-up study investigating the use of ePortfolios. This study follows one that was conducted previously involving 3 students using ePortfolios. These portfolios were used to track the assessment for and of learning of the students in secondary education masters degree cohort program. The study was performed through use of an open-ended questionnaire that was administered to twenty-six students. It was performed to assess the implementation of the ePortfolio in three student learning outcomes, self-knowledge, technological and organizational skills development and knowledge and skills transfer. Results proved to show changes in student learning after the second semester of implementation. The definition of an educational portfolio, according to Chambers and Wickersham, is a collection of work that an individual has built to showcase their learning process and progress. This showcase includes pieces the learner has selected that exemplifies their best work and development. Portfolios are utilized to market oneself and to reflect upon one’s education. Portfolios are now transitioning from
  • 141. binder to computer and are allowing the user to share their work with a larger audience through more resources such as cds or the internet. Companies and Open Sources are starting to develop electronic portfolio software, allowing the creator many options to choose from. The electronic portfolio, according to the authors, includes portfolios that are through electronic means such as internet based collections or works on DVDs. Electronic portfolios may be used in education to enhance all aspects, including teaching, learning and evaluation. Electronic portfolios are also a means for Universities to assess growth and progress in students. Some Universities are now expected to provide this evidence for accreditation. Likewise, the tables have turned for student evaluation. Student progress is now measured in work produced using the knowledge of the material they were taught, not by the material they were taught. Students now face two purposes of the portfolio, accountability and learning, and are left at odds with the development in their own hands. It is necessary for all stakeholders to understand the dual-system involved, for and of learning. The statistics that emerged from the questionnaire showed the second study group felt the ePortfolio helped increase knowledge, offered a way to reflect on one’s work,
  • 142. allowed a method to view peers’ work, increased technology skills and increased confidence. Conclusions include investigating the notion of faculty evaluations through ePortfolios and continuing to encourage and observe student responses to the ePortfolio. Methods of Evaluation Rubrics and other Methods of Evaluation are included with each Unit. Conclusion This curriculum was developed to fill the need for a Multimedia version of the Portfolio course TB332, Professional Procedures and Portfolio Development, at ITT Technical Institutes. Multimedia students, in general, need equal time to work on their visual portfolio, rather than the hardcopy version, which is common for the other programs. In
  • 143. closing, I feel that this curriculum could be easily implemented into the Multimedia Program at ITT Technical Institute. Proper adjustments may have to be made so that this curriculum suites each campus. This curriculum may be used by other schools and individuals with proper modifications as well. Extra materials and resources may have to be produced to suite each modification. appendix Materials placed with their corresponding Units.