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ADDIE
 

ADDIE

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ADDIE ADDIE Presentation Transcript

  •  and how it can be used by Multimedia students An Introduction to { } {ENTER}
  • Table of Contents {  } why it works
    • ADDIE
    • History
    • Theories
    • In Comparison
    • Uses in Multimedia
    • Quiz
    • References
  • ADDIE is {  } is ISD A phased systems approach is often referred to as the Instructional Systems Design model. The benefits in using this type of approach is that the end product is more likely to meet the genuine needs of the client. It also helps to ensure that the development does not begin until the planning process is complete which ends up saving costs and frustration from rework. ADDIE The most popular ISD approach is the ADDIE model. ADDIE represents the five phases of the project, Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement and Evaluate. Previous | Home | Next
  • The ADDIE phases the {  } phases Previous | Home | Next Gather evaluation data Review progress, performance and results of the product Document findings for possible redesign or updates Distribute the product and any aids Install/Upload technology Conduct assessments Gather feedback Develop the product Develop any manuals/instructions needed Develop assessment Create a prototype Conduct a tabletop review Review and validate the product Determine the program structure and duration Specify assessment and evaluation Define implementation requirements Create storyboards Identify the visual theme Gather materials Decide on a mode of delivery Determine the scope of the project Identify the target audience and their current knowledge Estimate costs and a schedule Compile learning objectives Research existing materials Evaluate Implement Develop Design Analyze     
  • Rapid Prototyping the {  } phases Rapid Prototyping      Rapid Prototyping For best results, the development process for an electronic project should use a modified ADDIE model, in which a rapid prototype phase is inserted after, or as an extension of, the design phase. A rapid prototype is simply a quickly assembled module that can be tested with the student audience early in the process. The evaluation typically looks at things like how well the learners responded to the creative metaphor, how effective the learning activities are, and how well the program performs on the chosen technology platform. Based on the feedback, the design can be revised and another prototype developed. This process continues until there is agreement and confidence in the prototype. Previous | Home | Next
  • Formative vs. Summative the {  } phases Formative vs. Summative Previous | Home | Next Summative Evaluation is the process of collecting data following implementation of the project in order to determine its effectiveness and satisfies the instructional objectives. Summative evaluation may measure knowledge transfer, learner outcomes, cost factors, and learner attitude. Formative evaluation involves gathering information during the early stages of the design process with the focus on finding out whether efforts are unfolding as planned, uncovering any obstacles, barriers or unexpected opportunities that may have emerged, and identifying mid-project adjustments and corrections which can help insure the success of the project. The feedback gathered during formative evaluation is designed to fine-tune the implementation of the program, gather reaction and identify what is not working.
  • History of Addie the {  } of ADDIE Click here to see more WWII posters ISD evolved from post-World War II research in the United States military to find a more effective and manageable way to create training programs and generate propaganda. These efforts led to early ISD models that were developed and taught in the late 1960's at Florida State University. In 1975, Florida State University coined the ADDIE model of Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation, which was selected by the Armed Services as the primary means for developing training. At the time, the term "ADDIE" was not used, but rather "SAT" (Systems Approach to Training) or "ISD" (Instructional Systems Development). As a general rule, the military used SAT, while their civilian counterparts used ISD. Previous | Home | Next
  • Gallery From informing the troops to informing the public, Instructional Design was put into high gear during WWII. Click here to return to the previous slide.
  • Theory: Behaviorism {  } 1. Behaviorism Definition Behaviorism is a theory of animal and human learning that only focuses on objectively observable behaviors and discounts mental activities. Behavior theorists define learning as nothing more than the acquisition of new behavior. Previous | Home | Next Rewards for good behavior or actions, free gift when they visit/call/purchase, showing a picture of a good product to generate ‘salivation’ Example Instructor design the learning environment, learner responds to the stimuli Involves Learning based upon the idea that all behaviors are acquired through conditioning. Conditioning occurs through interaction with the environment. Concept Training, education, is tapped into during the development/implementation process of ADDIE Applications
  • Theory: Constructivism {  } 2. Constructivism Definition Constructivism is a philosophy of learning founded on the premise that, by reflecting on our experiences, we construct our own understanding of the world we live in. Each of us generates our own "rules" and "mental models," which we use to make sense of our experiences. Learning, therefore, is simply the process of adjusting our mental models to accommodate new experiences. Previous | Home | Next Design that encourages the learner to understand the meaning, Example Emphasizes hands-on problem solving, Educators focus on making connections between facts and fostering new understanding in students, Instructors tailor their teaching strategies to student responses and encourage students to analyze, interpret, and predict information, Assessment becomes part of the learning process so that students play a larger role in judging their own progress instead of grades and tests conducted by the instructor, Involves The purpose of learning is for an individual to construct his or her own meaning, not just memorize the "right" answers and regurgitate someone else's meaning. Concept Curriculum, instruction, assessment, is tapped into during the development/implementation/evaluation process of ADDIE Applications
  • Theory: Cognitivism {  } 3. Cognitivism Definition Cognitivism as an internal, active, creative process. It emphasizes the critical role that memory plays in helping us translate new information into a form that is meaningful and will allow us to retrieve it and be able to use it. Memory involves three processes: attention, encoding and retrieval. Previous | Home | Next Design using association, Design telling the viewer what they can use the information/product for in their own lives, Recycling old themes and making them new Example The role of the teacher is to present new information in a way that helps the learner attend to, encode and retrieve information. The teacher should organize information and help students link it to existing information. Involves Learning takes place when information is received into the mind and then processed to make sense of it. Learning new information is made possible by connecting it to existing information and then storing it so it can be retrieved later. Concept Instruction, is tapped into during the implementation process of ADDIE Applications
  • Comparison: ASSURE ADDIE in {  } 1. to ASSURE ·        Analyze Learners ·        State Objectives ·        Select Media and Materials ·        Utilize Media and Materials ·        Require Learner Participation ·        Evaluate and Revise ASSURE A S S U R E A D D I E The ASSURE model is an ISD (Instructional Systems Design) process that was modified to be used by educators. You can use this process in writing your content and in improving instruction and learning. The ASSURE model incorporates Robert Gagne's events of instruction to assure effective use of media in instruction. Previous | Home | Next
  • Comparison: ARCS ADDIE in {  } 2. to ARCS ·        Attention ·        Relevance ·        Confidence ·        Satisfaction ARCS The ARCS model is a motivational model. This model is not intended to stand apart as a separate system for instructional design, but can be incorporated within another design process such as ADDIE or ASSURE. The ARCS model of motivational design consists of a set of categories of motivational concepts and strategies that are derived from a synthesis of the research on human motivation combined with a review of successful motivational practices. A R C S A D D I E Previous | Home | Next
  • Comparison: Kemp ADDIE in {  } 3. to The Kemp Model
    • Identify instructional problems
    • 2. Examine learner characteristics
    • 3. Identify subject content
    • 4. State instructional objectives for the learner
    • 5. Design instructional strategies
    • 6. Plan the instructional message and delivery
    • 7. Develop evaluation instruments
    • 8. Select resources to support instruction and learning activities
    The Kemp Model The Kemp Model emphasizes the interdependencies of each step in the process, highlights the importance of the evaluation, and recognizes more environmental factors in an educational setting. (Otherwise known as the MRK Model for all of it’s founders: Morrison, Ross and Kemp.) A D D I E 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Previous | Home | Next
  • Comparison: Dick and Carey ADDIE in {  } 4. to Dick and Carey 1. Instructional Goals 2. Instructional Analysis 3. Entry Behaviors and Learner Characteristics 4. Performance Objectives 5. Criterion-Referenced Test Items 6. Instructional Strategy 7. Instructional Materials 8. Formative Evaluation 9. Summative Evaluation The Dick & Carey Model Dick and Carey's model details a comprehensive and detailed process. It has been criticized for at the same time being too rigid and cumbersome for the average design process. A D D I E 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Previous | Home | Next
  • Uses in MM: Project {  } 1. Develop a project Previous | Home | Next Decide on a deliverable, Establish a methodology, Gather resources, Choose a graphic theme, Select fonts, Develop a color scheme, Develop a project outline, Develop a schedule/timeline including buffer time for redesign. Design Document the project performance and results. Evaluate Present the project, Upload the project. Implement Develop identity, Develop a prototype to test, get feedback on and redesign, Develop the project, Print documents. Develop Brainstorm/Idea Mapping, Analyze your entire project, Determine your project completion date, Decide on the specific topic, Establish the project’s parameters, Decide on a budget limit, List the major tasks, List the objectives. Analyze
  • Uses in MM: Portfolio {  } 2. Develop an Electronic Portfolio Previous | Home | Next Decide on a deliverable that will be easy to update, Establish a methodology, Gather resources, Choose a graphic theme, Select fonts, Develop a color scheme, Develop a project outline, Develop a schedule/timeline including buffer time for redesign. Design Document the project performance and results, Continue to update. Evaluate Upload the portfolio, Present the portfolio to an employer or school, Leave the employer or school with a calling card, cd/dvd version and resume in an organized folder. Implement Develop identity, Develop a prototype to test, get feedback on and redesign, Develop the portfolio, Print calling cards, resumes and hardcopies to accompany the portfolio. Develop Brainstorm/Idea Mapping, Analyze your entire project, Determine your project completion date, List current works you would like to include, List any gaps you may have in your work and decide on what you can do to fill those gaps, Establish the project’s parameters, Decide on a budget limit, List the major tasks, List the objectives. Analyze
  • Uses in MM: Identity Previous | Home | Next {  } 3. Client Identity {  } 3. Client Identity Client approvals throughout the process, Decide on a deliverable, Establish a methodology, Gather resources, Choose a graphic theme, Select fonts, Develop a color scheme, Develop a project outline, Develop a schedule/timeline including buffer time for redesign, Present client with cost estimate. Design Document the project performance, feedback from client and results. Evaluate Present the identity to the client on a cd/dvd, Present materials to the client, Accept payment. Implement Client approvals throughout the process, Develop identity, Develop a prototype to test, Get feedback on the design and redesign, Develop the project, Print documents requested and paid for by the client. Develop Meet with the client and gather general information, Brainstorm/Idea Mapping, Analyze your entire project, Determine your project completion date, Decide on the specific theme, Establish the project’s parameters, Decide on a budget limit, List the major tasks, List the objectives, Determine a method of payment. Analyze
  • Quiz Previous | Home | Next {  }
    • What is the Analyze phase in ADDIE? a. Translate the program objectives into terminal and enabling learning objectives. b. Clarify organizational and training program objectives. c. Rollout program communications to stakeholders.
    • When was Instructional Design originally developed? a. During WWII b. During the Bauhaus movement in Germany c. During the War of 1812 in the WNY area
    • What theory is based on the learned creating their own unique education? a. Behaviorism b. Cognitivism c. Constructivism
    • What part of the ASSURE model would be closely related to the Development phase in ADDIE? a. State objectives b. Evaluate and revise c. Utilize media and materials
    turn up your volume
  • References {  } Business Performance Pty Ltd (Modified 3/29/08). Instructional Systems Design . Retrieved March, 2008, from http://www.businessperform.com/html/addie_model.html. Dennis Tester (Modified 3/29/08). The ADDIE Instructional Design Model . Retrieved March, 2008, from http://www.dennistester.com/addie.htm. M. Malachowski (Modified 3/1/02). ADDIE Based Five-Step Method Towards Instructional Design . Retrieved March, 2008, from http://fog.ccsf.cc.ca.us/~mmalacho/OnLine/ADDIE.html. Martin Ryder (Modified 3/1/08). Instructional Design Models. Retrieved March, 2008, from http://carbon.cudenver.edu/~mryder/itc_data/idmodels.html. Previous | Home | Next 1/4
  • References {  } Judith V. Boettcher, Ph. D.  (Modified 6/3/98). Using the Web for Teaching: An Online Learning Module . Retrieved March, 2008, from http://vccslitonline.cc.va.us/usingweb/. Douglas College (Modified 7/03). The ASSURE Model for Selecting Instructional Media . Retrieved March, 2008, http://www.umdnj.edu/meg/legacy/assure_model_select_media.htm. Kevin Kruse (Modified 3/29/08). Introduction to Instructional Design and the ADDIE Model . Retrieved March, 2008, from http://www.e-learningguru.com/articles/art2_1.htm. A.W. Strickland Ph. D. (Modified 3/29/08). ADDIE. Retrieved March, 2008, from http://ed.isu.edu/addie/index.html. Previous | Home | Next 2/4
  • References {  } Intuology  (Modified 3/29/08). The ADDIE Instructional Design Model . Retrieved March, 2008, from http://www.intulogy.com/addie/index.html. Funderstanding (Modified 3/30/03). About Learning . Retrieved March, 2008, http://www.funderstanding.com/about_learning.cfm. Kendra Van Wagner (Modified 2008). What is Behaviorism? . Retrieved March, 2008, from http://psychology.about.com/od/behavioralpsychology/f/behaviorism.htm. John M. Keller (Modified 3/30/08). What is the ARCS Model?. Retrieved March, 2008, from http://www.arcsmodel.com/home.htm. Previous | Home | Next 3/4
  • References {  } Dana Bayer (Modified 5/10/01). Cognitivism . Retrieved March, 2008, from http://online.sfsu.edu/~foreman/itec800/finalprojects/danabayer/cognitivism.html. Max Wideman (Modified 3/30/03). Steps in Project Planning . Retrieved March, 2008, http://www.maxwideman.com/issacons/iac1079a/sld001.htm. Previous | Home 4/4