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Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams
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Strategic Knowledge Management for Monitoring and Evaluation Teams

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These slides were delivered in a workshop led by Leah D. Gordon for the Nigeria National Agency for the Control of AIDS February 12, 2012. …

These slides were delivered in a workshop led by Leah D. Gordon for the Nigeria National Agency for the Control of AIDS February 12, 2012.

The objectives of this workshop were to: 1.) gain a fundamental understanding of knowledge management principles and discover ways to integrate knowledge management into everyday work routines; 2.) Develop a clear structure for disseminating and promoting the use of information generated from research and evaluation studies.

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  • Data - facts and statistics collected together for reference or analysis Information - facts provided or learned about something or someone Knowledge - facts, information, and skills acquired through experience or education; the theoretical or practical understanding of a subject For one to translate into the other, we much explicitly define the process…
  • People – Who has the knowledge? Process – HOW is knowledge collected, archived and shared? Technology – Which platform is used to collect, share and archive the knowledge?
  • Explicit – found in reports, journal articles, books, magazines. Tacit – shared in workshops, presentations, conferences Three type of media…
  • Process driven mission. Providing an environment – How? Who does it involve? Facilitating planning, coordination, implementation and M&E – How? Who does it involve? Who are the people? What is the process? What technology is used?
  • KM for Data Use and Decision Making, Section 2.5 Benjamin Bloom developed a classification of different types of learning. Cognitive domain most relevant to sharing knowledge, building skills and promoting data use in public health.
  • Learners must pass through the knowledge and comprehension stages to arrive at application. It is at the application stage where skills are developed and/or policy is created.
  • Three types of media… Two types of knowledge…
  • What is a community? What is a practice?
  • I could spend some time unpacking this very succinct description but what I what to focus on today is the phrase “concern or passion” . I think that it is this passion that is the key to organizing and sustaining active, vital communities of practice Leah asked me to say something about the important role of COPs play in the project. The main value COPs have to the project (and remember that is a little different than the value to the members of the communities) is vehicles for communication and interaction among people who share a concern or passion for improving health projects. The domain: A community of practice is not merely a club of friends or a network of connections between people. It has an identity defined by a shared domain of interest. Membership therefore implies a commitment to the domain, and therefore a shared competence that distinguishes members from other people The community: In pursuing their interest in their domain, members engage in joint activities and discussions, help each other, and share information. They build relationships that enable them to learn from each other. The practice: A community of practice is not merely a community of interest--people who like certain kinds of movies, for instance. Members of a community of practice develop a shared repertoire of resources: experiences, stories, tools, ways of addressing recurring problems. This takes time and sustained interaction. It may be more or less self-conscious.
  • Problem solving "Can we work on this design and brainstorm some ideas; I’m stuck.“ Requests for information "Where can I find the code to connect to the server?“ Seeking experience "Has anyone dealt with a customer in this situation?“ Reusing assets "I have a proposal for a local area network I wrote for a client last year. I can send it to you and you can easily tweak it for this new client.“ Coordination and synergy "Can we combine our purchases of solvent to achieve bulk discounts?“ Discussing developments "What do you think of the new CAD system? Does it really help?“ Documentation projects "We have faced this problem five times now. Let us write it down once and for all.“ Visits "Can we come and see your after-school program? We need to establish one in our city.“ Mapping knowledge and identifying gaps "Who knows what, and what are we missing? What other groups should we connect with?"
  • CoP Start Up Kit page 5
  • Another thing Leah asked me to address was the question “What value that can be gained from COPS?” Cycle 1. Immediate value: the activities and interactions between members have value in and of themselves Cycle 2. Potential value: the activities and interactions of cycle 1 may not be realized immediately, but rather be saved up as knowledge capital whose value is in its potential to be realized later. Cycle 3. Applied value: knowledge capital may or may not be put into use. Leveraging capital requires adapting and applying it to a specific situation. Cycle 4. Realized value: even applied new practices or tools are not enough. A change in practice does not necessarily lead to improved performance, so it is important to find out what effects the application of knowledge capital is having on the achievement of what matters to stakeholders … EVALUATION Cycle 5. Reframing value: this happens when learning causes a reconsideration of how success is defined. It includes reframing strategies, goals and values…  
  • So how do you know when value is being created? Again I could spend a long time unpacking the answer to this question but for this talk all I want to do is point out that evaluating what we do is an important endeavor, not only for the improvement of the COPs but also for being able to turn our collective experience with COPs into something others that informs the global learning agenda. What this slide shows are some principal questions an evaluator might ask at each stage of COP development.
  • there are lots of different ways that people can incorporate leadership into the moderator’s role. The inspirational leadership provided by thought leaders and recognized experts The day-to-day leadership provided by those who organize activities The classificatory leadership provided by those who collect and organize information in order to document practices The interpersonal leadership provided by those who weave the community's social fabric The boundary leadership provided by those who connect the community to other communities The institutional leadership provided by those who maintain links with other organizational constituencies, in particular the official hierarchy The cutting-edge leadership provided by those who shepherd "out-of-the-box" initiatives. How exactly you choose to incorporate leadership into your COP-related activities will of course depend on a variety of thing including your personal style, the characteristics of the COP you’re working with and the aspirations of that COP. But regardless, for each person there are ways demonstrate leadership in your role as moderator and I encourage you to reflect on this and then act on the ways that seem best to you.
  • “ A Tool for Sharing Internal Best Practices”
  • Difficulty is proven through experience, for example too much time, money spent. Suggestions should come from credible sources and experienced professionals.
  • These sources may also contain “knowledge”
  • Transcript

    • 1. Strategic KnowledgeManagement for M&E Teams Workshop Leah D. Gordon Knowledge Management Specialist MEASURE Evaluation
    • 2. Objectives To gain a fundamental understanding of knowledge management principles and discover ways to integrate knowledge management into routine operations. Develop a clear structure for disseminating and promoting the use of information generated from research and evaluation studies. Appreciate difference between knowledge and information. Common tools and approaches to knowledge management of M&E systems.
    • 3. KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT
    • 4. What is knowledge management?
    • 5. What is knowledge management?“Getting the right information, to the right people atthe right time.”“Linking what we do with what we need to know.”
    • 6. Why manage knowledge?
    • 7. Why manage knowledge?To meet the challenge of connecting people,working smarter and getting results.
    • 8. TRANSLATING DATA INTOKNOWLEDGE
    • 9. KNOWLEDGEINFORMATION DATA
    • 10. PEOPLEPROCESSTECHNOLGY
    • 11. Explicit & Tacit KnowledgeExplicit Tacit Articulated and codified  Knowledge that is difficult knowledge stored in to transfer by means of media. writing or codifying.
    • 12. MANAGING KNOWLEDGE
    • 13. NACA MissionTo provide an enabling policy environment andstable ongoing facilitation of proactive multisectoral planning, coordinated implementation,monitoring and evaluation of all HIV/AIDSprevention and impact mitigation activities inNigeria.
    • 14. Turning Research into ActionTypes of learning –1.Cognitive involves comprehension, critical skills,procedural patterns and concepts.2.Affective involves the way people reactemotionally, values, empathy, motivation andattitude.3.Psychomotor involves change or developmentin behavior or skills.
    • 15. Cognitive learning 6. EVALUATION 5. SYNTHESIS 4. ANALYSIS 3. APPLICATION 2. COMPREHENSION1. KNOWLEDGE
    • 16. Cognitive learning 6. EVALUATION 5. SYNTHESIS 4. ANALYSIS 3. APPLICATION 2. COMPREHENSION1. KNOWLEDGE
    • 17. Sourcing KnowledgeWhere is the knowledge? Who has it?
    • 18. Citing References1. Use proper titles, names2. Citing helps readers and users reference source3. Helps establish your credibility as an information source
    • 19. THE KNOWLEDGE AUDIT
    • 20. Knowledge AuditIn order to solve the targeted problem, whatknowledge do I have, what knowledge is missing,who needs this knowledge an d how will they usethe knowledge?
    • 21. Knowledge AuditStep 1: Identify what knowledge currently exists.
    • 22. Knowledge AuditStep 1: Identify what knowledge currently exists.Step 2: Identify and locate explicit and tacitknowledge in the targeted area.
    • 23. Knowledge AuditStep 1: Identify what knowledge currently exists.Step 2: Identify and locate explicit and tacitknowledge in the targeted area.Step 3: Provide recommendations from theknowledge audit to management – address statusquo and possible improvements to the KM activitiesin the targeted area.
    • 24. Knowledge CycleKnowledge KnowledgeGeneration Capture Mission: To provide an enabling policy environment and stable ongoing facilitation of proactive multi sectoral planning, coordinated implementation, monitoring and evaluation of all HIV/AIDS prevention and impact mitigation activities in Nigeria.Knowledge KnowledgeApplication Sharing
    • 25. COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICE
    • 26. What is a Community of Practice? A community of practice is a group of people who share a concern or a passion for something they do and learn how to do it better as they interact regularly. Etienne Wenger
    • 27. What is a community of practice? A central principle of Knowledge Management is that organizations can best foster the capture and exchange of knowledge through CoPs – networks of people that identify issues, share approaches and make the results available to others.
    • 28. What CoPs Do Problem solving Requests for information Seeking experience Reusing assets Coordination and synergy Discussing developments Documentation projects Visits Mapping knowledge and identifying gaps Wenger, Home page
    • 29. The CoP Life Cycle
    • 30. Ways that COPs Create Value Immediate value: Activities and interactions Potential value: Knowledge capital Applied value: Changes in practice Realized value: Performance improvement Reframing value: Redefining success Wenger, Trayner and de Latt,
    • 31. Measuring Value of COPs Immediate value: What happened? Potential value: What was produced? Applied value: What difference did it make? Realized value: Did it change our ability to achieve what matters? Reframing value: Has it changed the understanding of what matters?
    • 32. Functional CoP Roles Executive sponsor: Nurture and provide top-level recognition for the community while insuring its exposure, support, and strategic importance in the organizations. Leader/facilitator/moderator: Provide the overall guidance and management needed to build and maintain the community, its relevance and strategic importance in the organization, and its level of visibility among stakeholders. Content manager: Search, retrieve and respond to direct requests for the community’s knowledge and content.
    • 33. Functional CoP Roles Events coordinator: coordinate, organize and plan community events or activities. Communications: Developing the communications and outreach plan and lead in providing the ongoing unidirectional communication with the CoP. Reporter: identifying, capturing, and editing relevant knowledge, best practices, new approaches and lessons learned into documents Education and skill development: The lead on coordinating the education and skill development activities, workshops, and content.
    • 34. Types of Leadership in COPs inspirational day-to-day classificatory interpersonal institutional cutting-edge Wenger, COPS: Learning as a Social System
    • 35. Community CommunicationStrategyHow the community communicates with itsstakeholders.
    • 36. Review:How have we communicated in thepast?How effective has that been?How do audiences perceive thenetwork?
    • 37. Objective:What do we want to achieve?
    • 38. Audience:Who is our audience?Do we have a primary andsecondary audience?What information do they need toact upon our work?
    • 39. Message:What is our message?Do we have one message formultiple audiences or multiplemessages for multiple audiences?
    • 40. Tools:What kinds of communication“tool” will best capture and deliverthe message?
    • 41. Channels:What channels will be used topromote and disseminateproducts and information?
    • 42. Resources:What kind of budget do we have?Will this change in the future?What communication skills do wehave?
    • 43. Timing:What is our timeline?Would a staged strategy be mostappropriate?What special events oropportunities might arise?
    • 44. Brand:Are the communication products“on brand”?Are we broadcasting the rightmessages?
    • 45. Feedback:How will we know ourcommunication strategy issuccessful?What will have changed?How can we assess whether wehad any influence?
    • 46. HOW TO IDENTIFY BESTPRACTICES
    • 47. Characteristics of a Best Practice1. Innovative and/or an improvement and/or set a precedent.2. Makes a difference and there is evidence of positive impact.3. Has a sustainable effect on the intended audience.4. Has potential for replication.
    • 48. How to find best practicesAsk the following to identify best practices1.What did we set out to do?2.What did we actually achieve?3.What went well?4.What could have gone better?
    • 49. COMMUNICATION TOOLSTHAT SUPPORT KM
    • 50. Sources: Print Media Periodicals Journal articles Books Case studies Fact sheets Briefs
    • 51. Sources: Electronic Media Television news reports Radio Documentaries/Film
    • 52. Sources: Social Media Blogs Twitter LinkedIn YouTube
    • 53. Knowledge Management Strategy Identify your audience Rationale Strategy – People, Process, Technology Lines of Action Monitoring and evaluation
    • 54. USING SOCIAL MEDIA TOPRACTICE KM
    • 55. Questions?Hands on social media experience
    • 56. WRAP UP
    • 57. MEASURE Evaluation is funded by the U.S. Agency forInternational Development (USAID) and implemented by theCarolina Population Center at the University of North Carolinaat Chapel Hill in partnership with Futures Group International,ICF International, John Snow, Inc., Management Sciences forHealth, and Tulane University. Views expressed in thispresentation do not necessarily reflect the views of USAID or theU.S. government.MEASURE Evaluation is the USAID Global Health Bureausprimary vehicle for supporting improvements in monitoring andevaluation in population, health and nutrition worldwide.

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