School Library ScenarioThe school district has been seeking additional cuts in its budget,following three years of reduced...
Build up a team of volunteersDecrease redundancies with local public library bycancelling database and periodical subscrip...
Farmer, Lesley and Marilyn Shontz. Despite the recession,media specialists are making the best of a bad situation. SLJ.Apr...
Although the shared library scenario seems a great deal, it is aLOT of work for the librarian. In the position I‟m current...
Collections of school libraries is completely different thanthe public libraries. Similar to Academic libraries differ fro...
more holistic information service. Students should use publiclibraries in addition to school libraries as part of the info...
Hey all!Here is an interesting article that I found that really relates towhat we are doing for this project. Essentially,...
http://schoollibrarywebsites.wikispaces.com/Reports. Theseexamples provide an excellent jumping-off point forconsideration...
students (see Table 3). This means that when thepercentage of school librarians increased, a percentincrease was also seen...
total staffing, larger collections of print and electronic resources,and more funding, students tend to earn higher scores...
In my opinion, it is up to school librarians to embrace thisresearch and to share it with teachers, administrators, andpar...
or none at all…no school had high test scores without a largelibrary‟ (p.293)” (Krashen 66).School libraries, more bang fo...
as guidelines. I‟m still working these up but wanted to add apreliminary post.Farmer, Leslie. 2012. Brace Yourself: SLJ’s ...
427/sljs_spending_survey_as_the.html.csp_____________________________American Library Association. 2011. School Libraries ...
Contracted services (e.g., repairs to computer or audiovisualequipment)Software license fees_______________________Additio...
-julie_______________________________________________________________Hi,I attended ISLMA‟s (IL School Library Media Associ...
implications would be. We could ask for a tax-deductibledonation of $100 from these businesses to increase funds.PUBLIC AN...
3. EBSCO (Biography Reference Center, NovelList, eBooks onEBSCOhost, K-8 Resources Databases)**All of these subscriptions ...
their peers recommendations. Poll the students when they cometo the school libraries, asking them to write down their favo...
For tips on working with cooperatively with fellow librarians(School and Public together):Ziarnik, Natalie Reif. School & ...
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School library scenario

  1. 1. School Library ScenarioThe school district has been seeking additional cuts in its budget,following three years of reduced revenue. It is proposing to closethe libraries in two schools near the town‟s public library.AudienceSchool Library BoardProbable ScenarioBoth school libraries will stay open, but they will share onelibrarian. There will be a partnership formed with the local publiclibrary to fill in gaps.Possible ScenarioBoth libraries will close and no formal relationship getsestablished with the local public library to supplement services.Preferable ScenarioWe are able to increase library revenue and decrease expensesthrough a partnership with the local public library, allowing bothschool libraries to stay open.Ways to Increase Library RevenueBook fairs through Scholastic or Anderson BooksBook sales - selling donated booksIncreasing fines for overdue booksPrivate donationsApply for the Department of Education‟s new InnovativeApproaches to Literacy Program Grant via www.grants.gov(there are about 30 grants available in the $150,000 to$750,000 range)Bonds?Forming partnerships with local businesses?Ways to Decrease Library Expenses
  2. 2. Build up a team of volunteersDecrease redundancies with local public library bycancelling database and periodical subscriptions, ie:Novelist K-12 subscription $400/yearFor in-school reading programs, instead of buying thebooks for the kids, borrow them from the public library (mayneed to use interlibrary loan as well)Collaboration with other school districts to leveragepurchasesBuying paperback books instead of hardcover booksReduce collection acquisition and rely more on the publiclibraryEmail overdue notices to students and/or parents instead ofmailing them to save on postageWays to work with the public libraryHave a librarian from the public library come to each of theclassrooms at both schools to speak to the kids about thevarious programs and resources that are available tosupplement what is available at their school libraryCreate marketing materials to be sent home to parentsletting them know about the complementary services thepublic library offers and encouraging them to get their kidsto the library as often as possibleSign all the kids up for public library cardsEstablish a fun and engaging reading event at the publiclibrary for the kids at the public schoolsDeliveries of public library materials to supplement thepublic school collectionsMiddle school booktalksOutreach to school groupsShuttle busses between schools and librariesHomework supportBibliography
  3. 3. Farmer, Lesley and Marilyn Shontz. Despite the recession,media specialists are making the best of a bad situation. SLJ.April 1, 2009. Web.http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/article/CA6648082.htmlHam, Stephanie. Tag-Team Librarianship: Partnerships betweenpublic and school libraries work well sometimes, but not alwaysSLJ. http://www.slj.com/2012/07/opinion/letters-to-slj/tag-team-librarianship-partnerships-between-public-and-school-libraries-work-well-sometimes-but-not-always-letters/Miller, Rebecca T. and Laura Girmscheid. It Takes Two: TheNeed for Tighter Collaboration Between School and PublicLibrarians. SLJ. May 1, 2012. Web.http://www.slj.com/2012/05/budgets-funding/it-takes-two-the-need-for-tighter-collaboration-between-school-and-public-librarians/Whelan, Debrah Lau. DOE Finally Opens Federal School LibraryGrant Application Process. SLJ. July 12, 2012. Web.http://www.slj.com/2012/07/budgets-funding/doe-finally-opens-federal-school-library-grant-application-process/Article Linkhttp://www.tandfonline.com.proxy2.library.illinois.edu/doi/abs/10.1080/1072303X.2011.580646Hi guys,Sorry I missed the first meeting.Meantime I talked to our library director who teaches SchoolLibrary coursework and emailed my friend who is a schoollibrarian. Here are their thoughs.The School Librarian:
  4. 4. Although the shared library scenario seems a great deal, it is aLOT of work for the librarian. In the position I‟m currently in, Ioperate two small school libraries (both about the size of thecurriculum library at VCSU) and teach classes to grades PreK-5.I know you know how hard running a library is (even a smallone), so I don‟t need to tell you running two is a great deal ofwork. For a while, in my two schools (before I came here), theyalso tried a Bookmobile for the smaller of the two schools.Truthfully, if I were in such a situation, I would research likecrazy to find some facts proving how very important libraries areto a student‟s success, get some parents on board, and speak atas many School Board meetings as possible to keep the librariesand librarians and look for other ways we can save somemoney—maybe each teacher gets a little less for supplies or wecome up with a fundraising activity like a book fair to cover someof the expenses.As far as the public library goes, it‟s a great idea in theory and IDO use the public library a lot both for lessons and personal use.However, you have to take into account that either you‟re goingto have to bus or walk the kids to the public library or somehowget a list of the books the kids want and bring them back (which Ido once in a while if there‟s a book a student wants that we don‟thave). I wonder if it‟s worth the extra stress on the person (thiswould create MUCH more work and headache for him/her) andextra time it takes to move kids.Director:She said that if she were the school librarian in this situation, shewould fight to keep both libraries open and here are her keypoints to make the case:Role of school libraries in a community and socialeconomic balance.o School libraries provide social economic balance byproviding access & convinience to resources thatsome of the kids can‟t afford. e.g Some families don‟thave computers at home, some families don‟t have acar or time to drive the kid around.
  5. 5. Collections of school libraries is completely different thanthe public libraries. Similar to Academic libraries differ frompublic libraries.These collections support the school curriculums andteachersOne important aspect is that school librarians are teacherstoo! They teach classes along with the other teachers.Sometimes they have to teach part time english in additionto Library literature classes and running the school library.Student performance is tied to the school librarian “kids thatschool librarians help them do better”If you close the libraries, who is going to help the students?Most of the time public libraries are not equipped to dowhat school librarians do. You still have to hire someone tofulfill the responsibilitiesMerging libraries could cost you more because of the work& resources involved in it. You have to hire people tocombine the collections, build relationship with schools.And you have to buy new materials to support the schoolcurriculums. Someone has to build relationships with theschool teachersSuggested Readings for "defense" of school libraries!http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/article/CA377858.htmlWhy is that so important?“This is significant because the school library has been veryclearly perceived to be a passive space where students go to getinformation. But libraries are more than a point of exchange toget books and Web sites. Thats a passive notion. This studyshows that school libraries are actively engaged as learninginstructional centers to develop intellectual scaffolds for studentsand to help them engage with information meaningfully toconstruct their own understanding of the topic theyre [studying]”Do school and public libraries need to collaborate moreclosely to get older students interested in reading?School and public libraries are functioning as separate entitiesand need closer collaboration and dialogue to provide a much
  6. 6. more holistic information service. Students should use publiclibraries in addition to school libraries as part of the informationchain.http://www.ilfonline.org/clientuploads/AIME/ILF_Position_Report_School_Librarians.pdfWhat does a School Librarian Do?A School Librarian is a teacher, an instructional partner, aninformation specialist, and a program administrator.• As teacher, the library media specialist collaborates withstudents and other members of thelearning community to analyze learning and information needs,to locate and use resources that will meet those needs, and tounderstand and communicate the information the resourcesprovide.• As instructional partner, the library media specialist joins withteachers and others to identifylinks across student information needs, curricular content,learning outcomes, and a widevariety of print, nonprint, and electronic information resources.• As information specialist, the library media specialist providesleadership and expertise inacquiring and evaluating information resources in all formats; inbringing an awareness ofinformation issues into collaborative relationships with teachers,administrators, students, andothers; and in modeling for students and others strategies forlocating, accessing, andevaluating information within and beyond the library mediacenter.• As program administrator, the library media specialist workscollaboratively with members ofthe learning community to define the policies of the library mediaprogram and to guide anddirect all activities related to it.
  7. 7. Hey all!Here is an interesting article that I found that really relates towhat we are doing for this project. Essentially, this articlediscusses “Getting the Story Out” to school administrators(jackpot!!)Foote, Carolyn. "Data Delivery: Getting The Story Out."Internet@Schools 19.4 (2012): 26-27. Library, InformationScience & Technology Abstracts. Web. 14 Oct. 2012.Some of the key points include:Administrators do not want to be overwhelmed by data -they are short on time, so they just want the bottom-line,big picture facts.Consider both what the data is trying to convey and theintended audience. How does the audience prefer toreceive the data - in a report, in a multimedia presentation,etc? The data is truly only as relevant/important as thestory that is behind it. In this way, the author advocates forreally examining the data and crafting the right message.Ask questions like: Do we want to focus on the entireschool year, or a certain event or program? Is our data toooverwhelming and not enough focused on the human sideof our students? How can school librarians use socialmedia throughout the school year to continually publicizethe library story?Some administrators suggested that they would like to beinvolved from the ground up in creating the library storywith the school librarianThe six criteria to utilize in order to make an idea stick withthe intended audience and impact them: “simplicity,unexpectedness, concreteness, credibility, emotion, andstory.” Also focus on boiling the data down to how it affectsthe average person.From the article, “A collection of innovative reports can befound at
  8. 8. http://schoollibrarywebsites.wikispaces.com/Reports. Theseexamples provide an excellent jumping-off point forconsideration, using various media, including video(Animoto), newsletters, charts, and infographies.”Never forget that it is not so much about the library orlibrarian as it is about the student - and this should beevident in any message conveyed.More research/statistics on the impact of school libraries onstudent achievement/performance:Lance, Keith Curry, and Linda Hofschire. "Something To ShoutAbout. (Cover Story)." School Library Journal 57.9 (2011): 28-33.Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts. Web. 14Oct. 2012.The article above uses facts/statistics to illustrate how thecurrent recession and implications of cutting school libraryprograms will affect the students. Has some nice charts we canmaybe use as well.Key findings include:Based upon a National Center for Education Statistics(NCES) Study conducted from In a 2004-2009,NationalCenter for Education Statistics Study 19 out of 26 statesthat gained school librarians realized a 2.2% gain inNational Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)reading test scores of fourth graders, as compared to anaverage 1% gain in 9 of 24 schools that lost librarians. Theimportance here is the ratio: gains in test scores are 2:1between schools that gained librarians vs. those that lostlibrarians.School libraries/librarians can be viewed as having a directimpact upon student learning and achievement uponconsidering that for some students (especially those at thepoverty level), the school library is the only access theyhave to “books, instruction, and reading advisory”“Our study showed that the percent change in the numberof school librarians from 2004-2005 to 2008- 2009 wassignificantly and positively correlated with the percentchange in the reading scores for all groups except for black
  9. 9. students (see Table 3). This means that when thepercentage of school librarians increased, a percentincrease was also seen in reading scores for all students,whether poor, Hispanic, or ELL.” (p .31).They were able to isolate the variable of school librarians,effectively proving that even when schools lose otherteachers/staff, it is the loss of the school librarian thatdirectly impacts student test performance.Student achievement is cumulative, meaning that lossesone year severely impact and put students behind insubsequent years.Lance, K. C. “What Research Tells Us About the Importance ofSchool Libraries.” Knowledge Quest v. 31 no. 1(September/October 2002 supp) p. 17-22. Web. 14 Oct. 2012.This article examines the question: “how do improvements inschool libraries contribute to such student progress?”Insights based upon studies in six states: Alaska, Pennsylvania,Colorado (2000) and Oregon and Iowa (2001) and New Mexico(2002).The original Colorado study indicated “that the size of the libraryin terms of its staff and its collection is a direct predictor ofreading scores. The amount of test score variation explained bythis school library size factor ranged from five to fifteen percentacross various elementary and secondary grades whilecontrolling for a variety of other school and communitydifferences.” In plain English, test scores increased by 5-15% indirect correlation with larger libraries, with all other factors beingequal. (p. 17).“Indirect predictors of achievement included the presence of aprofessionally trained librarian who plays an active instructionalrole and higher levels of spending on the school library.” (p. 17).In the six studies, Lance examined the following factors: schoollibrary development which is inclusive of “the ratios ofprofessionals and total staff to students, a variety of per studentcollection ratios, and per student spending on the school library.When school libraries have higher levels of professional and
  10. 10. total staffing, larger collections of print and electronic resources,and more funding, students tend to earn higher scores on statereading tests”(p. 18).Leadership - school librarians who are leaders (meet often withprincipal, participate in faculty meetings, help establish standardsand curriculum, and engage with library colleagues in thebuilding, district, and field) have more of a dramatic impact uponstudent achievement.Collaboration amongst school librarians and classroom teachersalso positively affects student learning.Technology- “In our recent studies, we have found that inschools where computer networks provide remote access tolibrary resources, particularly the Web and licensed databases,test scores tend to be higher” (p. 21).The above-mentioned research studies were purposefullydesigned to control for a variety of school and communitydifferences including: “characteristics of teachers, such as theirlevels of education, experience, and compensation; the teacher-pupil ratio; and total per pupil expenditures (school differences)and “poverty, minority demographics, and adult educationalattainment (community differences). (p. 22).Krashen, Stephen. The Power of Reading: Insights from theResearch. 2nd ed. Libraries Unlimited, 2004.Strikingly genius in its simplicity, Krashen compiles researchfrom hundreds of studies all in support of free voluntary readingor FVR. Effectively, Krashen has proven that FVR, or readingsimply for the purposes of intrinsic enjoyment, entails the bestway for students to amass a multitude of skills including readingcomprehension, vocabulary acquisition, spelling improvement,and overall increased literacy and command of language. Heargues that FVR leads to greater gains in language and literacydevelopment than direct instruction focusing upon teachingphonics and phonetic awareness.
  11. 11. In my opinion, it is up to school librarians to embrace thisresearch and to share it with teachers, administrators, andparents. It is evident that we are all living in a culture ofassessment, so having comprehensible, unambiguous proof atour fingertips that quality school libraries are a direct link toimproving testing scores remains an inestimable weapon in ourarsenal. Reading is clearly a self-fulfilling prophesy; in actuality, itis an organic process that gives rise to its own reward.Furthermore, it only takes that one unforgettable readingexperience, that one "home run book," as Krashen calls it, tocreate a lifelong reader.Here is some evidence from the text:Better school libraries (in terms of larger collections and longerhours) cause students to read more. Case in point, in a 1984study conducted by Houle and Montmarquette, “Increasing thesupply of books by 20 percent…increases the number of bookstaken out by 10 percent, and increasing library hours about 20percent increases loans by17 percent in high school libraries andabout 3.5 percent in elementary school libraries” (Krashen, 59).However, simply providing access to library materials is notenough to ensure success - other factors are involved includingphysical environment and more importantly professional librarystaff.Children get a majority of their reading material from libraries. Inthe following studies, the percent of books for 11-year old kidsoriginating from the school library is staggering:Doig and Blackmoore, 1995, School lib= 63%Worth, Moorman, and Turner, 1999 Low SES, School lib=34%Ivey and Broaddhus, 2001, School lib=55% (Krashen, 64)According to Mellon 1987, “Almost 90%” of ninth gradersreported the school library as their chief source for books(Krashen, 65).“Elley and Mangubhai (1979; reported in Elley 1984) found thatthe most important predictor of English reading scores amongchildren in the Fiji Islands was the size of the school library.„Those schools with libraries of more than 400 books producedconsistently higher mean scores than those with smaller libraries
  12. 12. or none at all…no school had high test scores without a largelibrary‟ (p.293)” (Krashen 66).School libraries, more bang for your buck!! Lance, Welborn, andHamilton-Pennell (1993) discovered “that money invested inschool libraries in Colorado was associated with higher readingscores, even when factors such as poverty and availability ofcomputers were controlled. Lance and his colleagues havereplicated these results in Colorado and in several other states,showing that library quality, defined in terms of number of booksin the library and the presence and quality of library staffingis consistently related to reading achievement” (Krashen 66).Various other studies have indicated that school libraries areconsistent predictors of success on NAEP reading scores. Theavailability of a print rich environment, quality staff, and numberof books in the library collection factor into this measure.Finally, Krashen advocates for diverting a small portion of fundsearmarked for technology and testing to be spent on schoollibraries. An interesting proposal that he makes concerns takingthe $5.3B spent on No Child Left Behind between 2002 and2008and “invest[ing][ it] instead in a trust fund for schoollibraries, dedicated to improving both books and staffing in highpoverty area schools? The interest on this sum might be enoughto guarantee a print-rich environment and adequate libraries forall children in the United States forever…” (Krashen,77)…..Could we propose something similar?????CourtneyHi, I‟ve been looking up budget numbers and am not coming upwith too much that‟s interesting. I‟m not sure how much of thelibrary‟s overhead (space, utilities, etc.) is picked up by theschool and how much is allocated in the library‟s budget. Sincewe make up our own numbers, I think that we can use these just
  13. 13. as guidelines. I‟m still working these up but wanted to add apreliminary post.Farmer, Leslie. 2012. Brace Yourself: SLJ’s School Library Spending SurveyShows the Hard Times Aren’t Over, and Better Advocacy Is Needed. SchoolLibrary Journal, March1.http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/slj/newsletters/newsletterbucketextrahelping2/893538-477/brace_yourself_sljs_school_library.html.csp“Fortunately, some materials and services, such as periodicals andtechnology, were funded from other budgets at the local, district, and statelevels. In addition, almost all states provided school libraries with statewidedatabase subscriptions.”2011 stats from the School Library Journal school library spendingsurvey:Median middle school library budget = $7,500Median salary of head public school librarians = $55,000Average middle school enrollment = 753Expenditure per student = $9.57One-third of middle schools have adult volunteersTwo-thirds of middle schools use student helpers, average of 6 studentvolunteersMiddle school librarians‟ top tasks: teaching (86%), tech troubleshooting(64%), faculty development (46%), tutoring (17%), managing textbooks(12%), network maintenance (5%), other duties (29%)Average 13,000 print titles (400 reference), add 243 annually, book budgetof $6,000 a year>90% funding for online resources is from local school boardsComputer hardware = (average) $1,182, two-thirds of the funds came fromlocal school boards; federal funding accounted for about 10%, and the restwas fund-raised.To advocate for funds, present “quantitative records of library usage(including records of circulation, individual and class visits, and space use),lessons taught, time spent on technology, staff requests, and studentprograms, links to library materials that support the school curriculum,evidence of the impact on student achievement, and a record of theincreased cost of materials, items lost, extra duties performed, and tasksthat can‟t be done because of limited staffing or funds”_____________Farmer, Leslie. 2011. “SLJ‟s Spending Survey: As the economy limpsalong and federal dollars dwindle, school librarians are turning intoresourceful survivors.” School Library Journal, March1.http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/slj/printissuecurrentissue/889109-
  14. 14. 427/sljs_spending_survey_as_the.html.csp_____________________________American Library Association. 2011. School Libraries Count:National Longitudinal Survey of School Library Programs.Chicago: American Association of SchoolLibrarians.http://www.ala.org/aasl/sites/ala.org.aasl/files/content/researchandstatistics/slcsurvey/2011/AASL-SLC-2011-FINALweb.pdfQuantifies use of school libraries___________________Baltimore County Public Schools, Office of Library InformationServices. 2004. Budget Planning Guide for School Library MediaSpecialists.www.bcps.org/offices/lis/office/admin/budgetplanguide.docBudget should include (for example):SalariesLibrary books and mediaClassroom supplies and equipment <$1000SubscriptionsFurniture and equipment (replacement)Furniture and equipment (additional )
  15. 15. Contracted services (e.g., repairs to computer or audiovisualequipment)Software license fees_______________________Additional ResourcesAmerican Association of School Librarians crisistoolkit:http://www.ala.org/aasl/aaslissues/toolkits/crisisSchool libraries’ impact studies:http://www.lrs.org/impact.php--MaureenMeuer, William G. “a jewel in the rough: resurrecting anelementary school library.” Teacher Librarian 32, no. 3 (February2005): 62-63. Library, Information Science & TechnologyAbstracts, EBSCOhost.http://search.ebscohost.com.proxy2.library.illinois.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=lxh&AN=16251599&site=ehost-liveThis article provides a great narrative example of what a ChicagoPublic School library did in order to match the money theyreceived in a grant. They started a Birthday Book Club, aprogram the school I work at also does, where students candonate to the library and pick a book off of a catalogue compiledby the school librarian. Alumni, families, businesses andcommunity members also became involved (holiday gifts toschool, made in memory of alumni or family members, made inpets or grandparents names) and the school was able to raisethousands of dollars for the library and match the money given tothem in the grant.A birthday book club, or a similar program in our library could bea great way to fundraise for the library.
  16. 16. -julie_______________________________________________________________Hi,I attended ISLMA‟s (IL School Library Media Association)conference this weekend and got some good ideas.IDEAS TO INCREASE LIBRARY FUNDS1. We need to get our PTOs (Parent Teacher Organization)involved. We should present all of the statistics about theimportance of school libraries (like the ones Courtney provided)to the PTO and ask for their support. They often have decentsized accounts with money that needs to get spent (instead ofsitting around collecting dust) and might be willing to off-setsome of the library expenses to keep both libraries open. Theyalso have a lot pull and might be able to persuade the schoolboard to keep the libraries open after hearing about theimportance of school libraries. Finally, they might be willing tocreate and operate a “Save Our Library” fundraiser with theresources (both financial and manpower) that they haveavailable. So, we need to allign ourselves with the PTOs at bothschools!2. Another librarian I heard speak mentioned that she hadpractically no budget at all. So, she went around to localbusinesses to get donations and it worked! We could createsome marketing materials (brochures, bookmarks) and goaround to the local businesses in the commmunity with somefacts about the library and their importance and how the librariesat the two schools might close and what we feel those
  17. 17. implications would be. We could ask for a tax-deductibledonation of $100 from these businesses to increase funds.PUBLIC AND SCHOOL LIBRARIES WORKING TOGETHER1. So many of the schools at this conference were workingtogether with their public librarians and discussed how importantthat relationship is. Many school use the public libraries for inter-library loan to supplement their collections and have the publiclibrarians come to the schools to speak to their students aboutthe databases and resources that are available for the kids touse to complete projects and assignements. Because mostschool libraries don‟t stay open late into the evening, the kids aregoing to the public libraries to do homework and get information.Plugging into the resources that are available at the public libraryare in everyone‟s best interest to supplement what happensduring the day at the school library. Also, the public librarians liketo know about upcoming school projects so they can reservebooks on specific topics that might benefit the kids. For example,if there is an upcoming project on natural disasters if the publiclibrarians know this in advance and know that they will have alarge number of students coming in the evenings to get booksthey can pull out resources in advance for the students tochoose from. Also, they can get interlibrary loan books inadvance to have at the ready on this topic when the kids comein.DATABASES THAT MANY SCHOOLS HAVE THAT “OUR”LIBRARIES COULD ELIMINATE TO SAVE MONEY (AND USETHEM AT THE PUBLIC LIBRARY INSTEAD)1. GALE CENGAGE LEARNING (LITERATURE RESOURCECENTER DATABASE, CLIC: WORLD HISTORY DATABASE). ISPOKE TO ONE LIBRARIAN WHO TOLD ME THE SUITE OFGALE RESOURES (THERE ARE MORE THAN THE TWO ILISTED) COSTS ABOUT $1,300/YEAR. www.gale.com2. PROQUEST LEARNING DATABASE www.proquestk12.com
  18. 18. 3. EBSCO (Biography Reference Center, NovelList, eBooks onEBSCOhost, K-8 Resources Databases)**All of these subscriptions are at least $1,200/year. So, ourtheoretical schools could have subcriptions to some of these thatthey decide to cancel because the public library has the same orsomething similar that the kids can use and will come to theschools to teach the kids during classtime how to use thedifferent databases that are available when they come to thepublic library.SCHOOL LIBRARY IMPORTANCE STATISTICSI got a whole book entitled “Powerful Libraries Make PowerfulLearners: The Illinois Study from 2005. It is FILLED withstatistics and information about the importance of schoollibraries. However, I think the stats that Courtney provided aregreat. If we feel like we need more, I can always pull some greatthings out of this study, but for now it seems like we are coveredhere.NEW GRANT AVAILABLEThere is a new grant available to provide libraries with freenonfiction books that our libraries could apply for to reduceexpenses on nonfiction books. It is called the LBSS EndowmentFund. www.lbssfund.org/index.htmREADING PROGRAM WITH THE PUBLIC LIBRARYThis idea is based on a program I implemented at a middleschool I did my practicum at last semester. While I did it solelywithin the public school I was working at, we could easily workthe public library into the equation....Create a peer book advisory program for the students of of ourtwo schools in an effort to create tools for them to use inselecting books when they come to the PUBLIC library based on
  19. 19. their peers recommendations. Poll the students when they cometo the school libraries, asking them to write down their favoritebook along with three descriptive sentences stating why theywould recommend this book to a friend. Compile the results ofthese inquiries and use them to create a variety of tools for thestudents to use when they go to the public library.These tools include:1. Bookmarks, by grade, with a list of the peer recommendations2. Displays, by grade, in the library with a list of all the booksselected and who recommended each of them along with theactual displayed books and a description of the book along withthe students descriptive statements3. Bulletin boards outside the school and public librariesmarketing the program and inviting the students to the publiclibrary to check out the books that their friends recommended.4. A PowerPoint presentation which will loop on the monitor inthe YA section of the public library with a photo of the childholding up the book of their choice along with their descriptivesentences about the bookAt this developmental stage, children are very interested in theirpeers opinions and ideas. Creating this program will give theman opportunity to learn about the books their friends like, get newbook ideas and hopefully open up a line of discussion amongfriends about their various book suggestions and get them goingto the public library so that, while there, they will check out peerrecommended books plus utilize the other resources that areavailable at the public library (but no longer at the school librarieslike databases for projects that were eliminated at the schoolsdue to budget cuts).For more information on collaborations between public andschool libraries:MacDonald, Cynthia. "Public Libraries + School Libraries =Smart Partnerships." CSLA Journal 30.2 (2007): 11-12.
  20. 20. For tips on working with cooperatively with fellow librarians(School and Public together):Ziarnik, Natalie Reif. School & Public Libraries: Developing theNatural Alliance. Chicago: American Library Association, 2003.Leah

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