Zarmati

499 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
499
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
47
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Zarmati

  1. 1. science museum history museum CONSTRUCTIVISM MUSEUM EDUCATION THEORYSQUARE PEGS IN ROUND HOLES:Why Constructivist Learning Theory doesn’twork in history museums Louise Zarmati Deakin University
  2. 2. learning journey My perspective as a researcher informed by my experience as a • History teacher • Archaeologist • Museum educator • History educator
  3. 3. research questions1. Methods of museum educators to teach history - educators2. Museum methods versus classroom history method - observations3. History teachers’ perspectives of effectiveness - teachers
  4. 4. literature review Previous studies have been on: •Science, not history •Primary, not secondary •Informal, not formal •Learning, not teaching
  5. 5. What isConstructivist Learning Theory?
  6. 6. the learner Reaction against behaviourism – ‘empty vessel’
  7. 7. Context of Constructivist Learning Theory Late 1980s – 1990s • postmodernism • New Museology • post-colonialism – subaltern theory • democratisation - ‘history from below’ • Marxism – feminism • multiculturalism in Hawke-era Australia - 1987
  8. 8. Theoretical discourse: antithetical perspectives Constructivism versus Behaviourism Visitor versus Educator Learning versus Teaching Active versus DidacticFOCUS ON THE LEARNER AND LEARNING
  9. 9. museum education theory history museum
  10. 10. Historical Thinking – Historical Inquiry Method
  11. 11. What is pedagogy? Knowledge PEDAGOGY Learner CommunicatorDavid Lusted, 1986, Why pedagogy?, Screen, vol. 27, no. 5, pp. 2-16.
  12. 12. Historical Inquiry Method Historical Thinking1. Ask historical questions2. Locate and interrogate primary sources3. Detect bias, causation, continuity and change, perspective, interpretation4. Develop an argument5. Communicate findings
  13. 13. Role of museum educatorThe learner The educator
  14. 14. multiple interpretationsSubversion?
  15. 15. Bells Forge Gorge display, 2006, National Museum of Australia http://www.nma.gov.au/education/school_resources/Cycladic figurine
  16. 16. Why CLT doesn’t work in history museums1. Artefacts need temporal and geographical contextualisation – terms and concepts explained to beginning learners2. Holistic, pedagogical approach needed3. Evaluation of learning should also evaluate quality of teaching4. Focus on learner can lead to educator being edited out Learning in museums not just about the learner
  17. 17. Study of eight museums Museum of Sydney Hyde Park Barracks, Sydney Museum of Australian Democracy, Canberra National Museum of Australia, Canberra Melbourne Museum Immigration Museum, Melbourne Sovereign Hill, Ballarat Port Arthur Historic Site, Tasmania
  18. 18. Where to now?1. Shift from learning to pedagogy2. Put educator back in the picture3. Use H.I.M and historical thinking4. Expert educators design and deliver programs5. History museum educators engage in theoretical discourse

×