LLC Webinar Series: ReAmp Case Study

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  • 1. Leadership in NetworksLessons from The RE-AMP NetworkPRESENTED TO LEADERSHIP LEARNING COMMUNITY:Heather McLeod Grant, Monitor InstituteRick Reed, Garfield Foundation, Senior AdvisorDec. 6th, 2011
  • 2. Welcome, IntroductionsWho are We? What is Monitor Institute?Part consulting firm … part incubator… … part think tankWhat is the Garfield Foundation? A Family Foundation using System’s Approaches to Achieving Sustainability
  • 3. Monitor Institute’s “Networks” Work Consulting Incubator Think Tank Network of Network Funders 3
  • 4. What Is a Network? A group of people or organizations connected by relationshipsnetwork/ˈnɛtˌwɜrk/― Noun (the what): a structural form for organizing― Verb (the how): to connect, spread, organize into a network― Adjective: connected, transparent, decentralized 4
  • 5. ReAmp Network at a Glance• Founded in 2003-04 with seed funding from The Garfield Foundation and Rick Reed leading the charge• Desire to bring different nonprofits and funders together in a network to begin to change a system• Now comprised of 138 nonprofits and 15 funders across 8 states in the Midwest• Goal: to reduce global warming emissions 80% by 2050 5
  • 6. Making the Case: 3rd Party Evaluation Findings 86% of member organizations agree that RE-AMP is an effective use of staff, time, and resources. 65% agree that as a result of their participation in RE-AMP they are using better strategies. 63% report that as a result of their participation foundations & advocates in the network have become better aligned, and advocates have become better aligned with each other. 92% of foundation members agree that their participation in RE-AMP is helping them make better funding decisions.
  • 7. Systemic Alignment = Accelerated Progress = Policy Success = Policy in Play
  • 8. START BY UNDERSTANDING THE SYSTEMYOU ARE TRYING TO CHANGE.INVOLVE BOTH FUNDERS AND NONPROFITSAS EQUALS FROM THE OUTSET.DESIGN FOR A NETWORK, NOT AN ORGANIZATION—AND INVEST IN COLLECTIVE INFRASTRUCTURE.CULTIVATE LEADERSHIP AT MANY LEVELS.CREATE MULTIPLE OPPORTUNITIESTO CONNECT AND COMMUNICATE.REMAIN ADAPTIVE AND EMERGENT—ANDCOMMITTED TO A LONG-TERM VISION. 8
  • 9. DESIGN FOR A NETWORK, NOT ANORGANIZATION—AND INVEST INCOLLECTIVE INFRASTRUCTURE. 9
  • 10. NATL. The Commons ENVIRONMENTAL Media Center ORGS. (Online) CAUCUS: Natl. Environmental ENVIRONMENTAL WORKING WORKING NONPROFITS Organizations GROUP: GROUP: ENVIRONMENTAL FUNDERS Transpor- Found- tation ations CAUCUS: Faith-Based WORKING Steering CAUCUS: Community GROUP: WORKING Midwest Committee ENVIRONMENTAL GROUP: Governors Clean NONPROFITS Synergy Coal Association Energy Committee ENVIRONMENTAL FAITH-BASED NONPROFITS COMMUNITIES WORKING WORKING NONPROFITS GROUP: GROUP: TRACKING M.G.A. ENVIRONMENTAL Global POLICY NONPROFITS Energy Warming Solutions Efficiency ENVIRONMENTAL CAUCUS: CAUCUS: NONPROFITS Rural Youth In-Person Learning & Meetings Progress Reports RURAL COMMUNTY Global Warming ORGANIZATIONSYOUTH ORGS. Strategic Action Fund 10
  • 11. CULTIVATE LEADERSHIP AT MANY LEVELS. 11
  • 12. Many Leadership Roles in the Network  Establishes first links to participants ORGANIZER/  Designs and oversees/ produces the process ENTREPRENEUR  Brings in other resources and facilitators as needed  Ensures flow of information and other resources  Provides initial resources for organizing the network LEAD FUNDER  Invests in network capacity building  Can be multiple people with formal and informal roles – help the group CONSULTANTS/ FACILITATORS organize and do their work  Tasks and consultants change over time  Facilitates the network use of technology to learn, coordinate, connect NETWORK  Organizes convenings COORDINATOR & STAFF  Connects people to each other  Manages network “administration”  Steering Committee ELECTED MEMBER  Working Group leaders LEADERSHIP  Caucus leadership  All represent the membership – leadership can emerge anywhereSources: Peter Plastrik and Madeleine Taylor, Net Gains (2006); Beth Kanter; Stephanie Lowell , Building the Field of Dreams (2007); White, Wenger, and Smith, Digital Habitats (2009)
  • 13. Organizer/ Entrepreneur/ Evangelist (Rick Reed) • Entrepreneur: Initiated first convening, identified initial ORGANIZER/ participants and the “issue” to work on ENTREPRENEUR • Catalyst: Launched systems-mapping process for Garfield LEAD FUNDER • Exec. Producer: Identified network needs, brought in other consultants to facilitate at different stages CONSULTANTS/ FACILITATORS • Evangelist/ Weaver: Helped raise resources and bring other funders and nonprofits to the table NETWORK COORDINATOR & STAFF • Holding the Whole: Oversees evolution of the whole network, continually identifying new collective needs ELECTED MEMBER LEADERSHIP • Problem-solver: “Sees around corners” – spots problems and figures out solutionsSource: Adapted from Net Work by Patti Anklam (2007) and “Vertigo and the Intentional Inhabitant: Leadership in a Connected World” by Bill Traynor (2009)
  • 14. Lead Funder (Garfield) • Innovator: Had initial concept to test – wanted to ORGANIZER/ apply “network” methodology to social problem ENTREPRENEUR solving on a big issue • Catalyst: Hired Rick Reed to act as organizer/ LEAD FUNDER entrepreneur on foundation’s behalf CONSULTANTS/ • Seed Funder: Provided ample “walking around” money FACILITATORS with few strings attached to get it off the ground NETWORK • Growth Investor: Continued to invest in collectiveCOORDINATOR & STAFF capacity building (facilitation, convening, etc.) • Weaver: Brought other funders to the table ELECTED MEMBER LEADERSHIP
  • 15. Facilitators/Consultants (Many) • Systems Mapping: Scott Spann led initial process to ORGANIZER/ identify the problem and points of leverage ENTREPRENEUR • Network Development: Grove Consultants helped working groups identify strategic priorities; they continue LEAD FUNDER to facilitate whole-network convenings • Network Design: Ruth Rominger helped conceptualize CONSULTANTS/ FACILITATORS design of the network and apply theory to practice • Evaluation/Learning: Pete Plastrik and Chinwe NETWORKCOORDINATOR & STAFF Onyeagoro conducted first Network evaluation to identify successes and opportunities for improvement ELECTED MEMBER • Documentation/Dissemination: Monitor Institute LEADERSHIP codified learning from the network to share in the field
  • 16. Network Coordinator/Staff (Distributed) • Network Coordinator: ORGANIZER/ ENTREPRENEUR • Staffs the Steering Committee, provides executive support for meetings (monthly and in-person) • Plans annual collective convening LEAD FUNDER • Produces and manages annual budget for network • Go-to person for Working Group leaders • Manages other staff CONSULTANTS/ FACILITATORS • Staff: • Half-time staff for each Working Group leader (co- NETWORKCOORDINATOR & STAFF located with WG leader’s organization) • Three caucus staff report to coordinator • Other staff distributed throughout structure and ELECTED MEMBER LEADERSHIP report to SC: Media Center; Commons; Learning and Progress
  • 17. Elected Leadership (Distributed) • Steering Committee: Elected body comprised of ORGANIZER/ Working Group leaders, at-large leaders, experts ENTREPRENEUR • Working Groups: Primary mechanism for organizing LEAD FUNDER the group’s work; each WG elects its leaders • Caucuses: Other groups used to reach out and CONSULTANTS/ represent specific constituencies (appointed) FACILITATORS • Other: Leadership can emerge from anywhere in the NETWORK network at any time – “do-ocracy”COORDINATOR & STAFF ELECTED MEMBER LEADERSHIP
  • 18. Different Leadership at Different Stages Adapted from the work of iScale and June Holley & Valdis Krebs
  • 19. Characteristics of Network Leadership • Distributed and fluid: many people, many roles, power not concentrated • Spacious: radical democracy; leadership can emerge from anywhere at any time • Collective: group “brain trust” and intelligence • Committed: Deep buy-in and investment • Messy: Sometimes process-intensive; decision- making can take longer
  • 20. Challenges Faced by Network Leaders Unlearning past behaviors Letting go of control, Continuing to engage (not reverting to messiness of process network participants organizational model) Decision rights; interface with outside world Sharing knowledge and Identifying and measuring collective learning impact/ network “health” Learning and leveraging new technologiesSource of images: Cut Throat Communications, Blog.com, Rutgers University RU FAIR, Kodaikanal International School, flickr
  • 21. Implications for Leadership Development Work • New Paradigm: Shifting from leadership as an individual position to a collective behavior shared by many (leadership in networks) • Collective Capacity Investments: Consider investing in collective capacity building, not just individual or organizational development • Context: Leadership is imbedded in the context of an ecosystem of actors, and a whole system – not in isolation • Recruiting: The above will impact how you think about recruiting, and who you are developing • Competencies/ Evaluation: The skills you develop, and how you assess leaders is very different in a network • Other: What else?
  • 22. Questions?Heather McLeod Grant, Monitor Institute heather_grant@monitor.com Rick Reed, RE-AMP reamprr@gmail.com To download the case study: www.monitorinstitute.com/reamp 22