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LLC Webinar Series: Coaching as a Leadership Development Strategy

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Leadership development is on the forefront of grantmaker and capacity builders' minds, particularly as organizations navigate the current realities they face. This webinar was for experienced …

Leadership development is on the forefront of grantmaker and capacity builders' minds, particularly as organizations navigate the current realities they face. This webinar was for experienced capacity builders who are interested in exploring coaching as a leadership development strategy. CompassPoint shared what they have learned about how coaching can help nonprofit leaders succeed along with highlights from the Coaching and Philanthropy Project and their own work incorporating coaching into several leadership development programs.

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  • Introduce self, Linda, and Paula Outline agenda IF polling available: How many of you are interested in understanding more about coaching and its potential impact but have had not yet engaged in coaching? How many of you have had (a) experience with at least 1 coaching engagement; (b) 5 or more coaching; (c) 10 or more)? How many on call have received coaching personally?
  • Late 90’s EDs were saying that they were passionate about mission and committed to organization, but the jobs were burning them out. Daring to Lead study in 2001 and again in 2006 confirmed this. Lots of challenges including isolation and loneliness at the top; also challenging with getting staff and board aligned, setting boundaries, prioritizing work, etc., At the same time as we’re losing positional leaders, we asked the question, who can fill their positions? Many next generation leaders said they didn’t want the job because it was not sustainable. Many strategies were recommended for dealing with this. And coaching was one of them.
  • Coaching moves a person forward from where are they to where they want or need to be. It fosters new levels of reflection, awareness, communication, accountability and engagement.   The ultimate goal of coaching is to help someone move to a new action or behavior while learning, growing and developing. Discuss action learning model (action, reflection, learning). Nonprofits have no time to stop and reflect in order to do things differently. Coaching supports this process.
  • While it is important to understand the definition of coaching, it is equally important to clarify that coaching does not take the form of other familiar approaches. Coaching is not mentoring, consulting, training, nor therapy. Not consulting = coaching provides one-on-one support for leaders. Traditional org consulting focuses more broadly on the organization and can be an expert model Not therapy = does not focus on past trauma or the roots of trauma Mentoring often described as “walking through the door before you” while coaching is “walking through the door with you” Training pushes information out However, coaching can be used within all these practices. \\ Coaching is not punitive. Coaching isn’t a replacement for good human resource systems.
  • These are pulled from CompassPoint coaching referral service from the past several years. Explain content coaching (fundraising, boards, finance)
  • This is adapted from the work of CCL, GEO, and Building Movement Project. These are leadership domains that start with leading self (self awareness and self management) and ripple outward. Research from the CAP Project has shown where coaching has impacted these domains.
  • Almost two-thirds said coaching was “very effective” compared with other types of leadership development support and tools for organizational effectiveness, such as training, workshops, classes or seminars.
  • LINDA
  • LINDA
  • While one-one-one leadership coaching is the most common and focuses on developing a leader’s capacity and skills, there are other models of coaching that can be impactful and much more accessible and cost effective. These include nonprofit managers being trained to coach those they supervise (manager as coach) or to coach each other (peer coaching). Targeted coaching (sometimes called content coaching) is when a coach works with someone to develop a discreet, well defined topic or issue such as HR or board. Blended or hybrid combines coaching with other capacity building methods such as OD consulting) Team coaching is when a coach or a group of coaches work with a team from the same organization.
  • INDIVIDUAL Coaching can help the individual set priorities or develop key skills Help them prioritize and make choices Aid the individual in increasing self-awareness and developing mgmt skills Provide a confidential partner who allows the individual to share concerns that he/she may not be comfortable sharing with staff, board, or grantmakers Assist in planning a successful move Help define career goals Help determine what’s next, support the process of letting go, or creating a good ending ORG Assist individual and teams in defining changes in roles and responsibilities and Iding system changes Bring greater focus and accountability to leaders Help develop and support good performers Provide opps to think about and plan how to put new learning into practice
  • PAULA
  • It is important for coachees to have a choice in selecting a coach. The coaching relationship is most effective when the coachee is ready to engage in self-reflection, able to apply learnings and change practices/behaviors, and is prepared to commit the time and energy to the coaching process. The coachee’s organization should also be prepared for the coaching process even when they are not directly engaged in the sessions. At times a coach can cross over into an OD consultant’s role, which can streamline organizational changes; however, it is important to be very clear about the differences between the two roles and their boundaries Coaches are most effective when given information about the coachee (e.g., individual goals and assessments) and the program (e.g., goals and other supports). The coach and coachee should articulate, in writing, specific coaching goals, expectations and format (e.g., determination of who is the client; confidentiality agreements; who sets the agenda; assignment of homework; frequency, length and method of sessions). The process of matching a coach and a coachee should be guided by what the coachee wants to accomplish, the coaches’ background, experience and style; and the ability to develop rapport and trust. Coaches who are working with grantees should have appropriate coaching experience and skills, as well as an understanding of the unique challenges facing nonprofit leaders. Due to the confidential nature of coaching, reporting to funders and/or board members typically differs from other types of supports.
  • It is important for coachees to have a choice in selecting a coach. The coaching relationship is most effective when the coachee is ready to engage in self-reflection, able to apply learnings and change practices/behaviors, and is prepared to commit the time and energy to the coaching process. The coachee’s organization should also be prepared for the coaching process even when they are not directly engaged in the sessions. At times a coach can cross over into an OD consultant’s role, which can streamline organizational changes; however, it is important to be very clear about the differences between the two roles and their boundaries Coaches are most effective when given information about the coachee (e.g., individual goals and assessments) and the program (e.g., goals and other supports). The coach and coachee should articulate, in writing, specific coaching goals, expectations and format (e.g., determination of who is the client; confidentiality agreements; who sets the agenda; assignment of homework; frequency, length and method of sessions). The process of matching a coach and a coachee should be guided by what the coachee wants to accomplish, the coaches’ background, experience and style; and the ability to develop rapport and trust. Coaches who are working with grantees should have appropriate coaching experience and skills, as well as an understanding of the unique challenges facing nonprofit leaders. Due to the confidential nature of coaching, reporting to funders and/or board members typically differs from other types of supports.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Coaching as a Leadership Development Strategy
    • 2. Why Coaching? 3 out of 4 E.D.s likely to leave their jobs within next five years How will the nonprofit sector attract the most committed and talented leaders?
    • 3. What is Coaching?
      • A process of supporting individuals to make
      • more conscious decisions
      • The ultimate goal of coaching is to help someone move to
      • a new action or behavior while learning,
      • growing and developing.
    • 4. Coaching is NOT….
    • 5. Reasons for Seeking Coaching
    • 6. Coaching can have a Ripple Effect Increased self awareness Improved management and leadership skills More effective goal setting and follow through Improved decision making Better able to manage life/work balance More effective delegation Increased job satisfaction More skilled conflict resolution More effective senior team and boards Improved listening and communication Greater clarity of organizational vision/roles Improved organizational culture Higher levels of confidence/clarity Smoother transitions
    • 7. Benefits Compared To Other Types of Supports
      • Provides tailored and timely assistance
      • Provides an objective and confidential ear
      • Offers a time and place to reflect
      • Helps in problem solving and accountability
      • Facilitates application of learnings from other leadership supports
      • Enables ongoing and consistent support
      “ [Coaching] was much more effective, impactful and satisfying than any other leadership development, as it was completely customized for me! [My coach] helped hold me accountable…and pushed me to devote the time needed when it was easier to bury myself in programmatic responsibilities.” - Coachee
    • 8. Insider’s View of Coaching
      • Executive directors:
      • How does coaching help me as a leader?
      • What’s the value?
      Gilda Gonzales Janet Carter http://www.haasjr.org/programs-and-initiatives/video/power-coaching# David Kakishiba
    • 9. Insider’s View of Coaching
      • Evaluator and Coach:
      • What’s successful coaching?
      • What’s the advice for funders?
      • How do you evaluate impact?
      Bill Ryan Gail Ginder
    • 10. Coaching Offered in Many Forms
    • 11. When to Use Coaching
    • 12. When Coaching is NOT the Best Solution
    • 13. Recommendations for Funders
      • Support to become more conscious consumers of coaching
      • Assess individual and organizational readiness
      • Assist with clarifying purposes of coaching engagement
      • Provide grantees with choices when selecting a coach
      • Build a diverse pool of coaches with both training AND nonprofit experience
      • Ensure grantee and coach can articulate individual goals and tie to organization’s goals
    • 14. Recommendations for Field
      • Document and share coaching practices, models and impacts
      • Support more rigorous standards
      • Invest in coach recruitment and training and build coaches’ capacity and effectiveness
      • Consider issues of diversity in coaching
      • Explore coaching as an opportunity for “second acts” for executive directors who are transitioning out of their organizations
    • 15. For more information http://www.compasspoint.org/coaching http://www.haasjr.org/index.php/visitor/our_grantmaking/leadership/coaching