Developing
Social Change
Leaders:
Practices and Perspectives on
Fostering an Intersectional
Approach
Tuesday, August 6, 20...
Our Story
• Founded in the early 1990s by
a multiracial coalition of
organizations uniting to
respond to growing intergrou...
Values and Practices
From the beginning…
• Early research informed the program’s paradigm around social
change leadership
• Sought to provide w...
Defining social change leadership
• Committed to social justice
• Emphasizes collaboration and
relationship building—
unde...
Expanding our lens
• A singular focus on race/ethnicity undermined the work
• Supporting leadership from a social justice ...
Dominant
Group
Keeping best practices
• Dedicate enough time and attention to preparation with facilitators,
tailoring of curriculum, and...
Keeping best practices
• Start by building trust to pave the way for deeper processing around
identity, privilege, power, ...
Ways we work
• Intensive series
• Capacity-building
• Consulting services and
customized workshops
• Public workshops
Intensive Series
• Facilitation for
Social Change
• LDIRs in Health
• Leadership for
Social Change
• Healing for Social
Ch...
Central Valley Leadership for
Social Change
Resource Highlight: Allyship
1. Self-awareness
2. Self-education
3. Creating and open
and supportive
environment
4. Taking...
Healing for Social Change
Resource Highlight:
Isms at Work
A liberatory space is one that is free from
racism, sexism, ableism, transphobia,
heteros...
Capacity Building
• Philadelphia, PA
• Flint, MI
• Central Valley, CA
• Solano Coalition
for Better Health
• Gender Justic...
Consulting Services
• LA Public Health
Department
• Center for
Nonprofit
Management
• Riverside Human
Relations
Commission
Public Workshops
• Facilitating
Intergroup
Dialogue
• Strategies to
Manage Conflict
• Supervising to
Empower
Q&A
Thank you
Keep in touch!
ldir.org
facebook.com/ldirprogram
twitter @leaders4action
activistsoul.tumblr.com
linkedin.com/co...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Developing Social Change Leaders: Practices and Perspectives on Fostering an Intersectional Approach to Identity and Social Justice

748 views

Published on

The Leadership Development in Interethnic Relations (LDIR) program has been training leaders for social change since the early 1990s, when it was founded by a multiracial coalition of organizations led by the Asian Pacific American Legal Center. The program's curriculum prioritizes the growth of participants' analyses around race, gender, class, ability, and more, alongside the development of effective facilitation and communication skills. This presentation will provide insight into the rationale and values behind LDIR's pedagogy, challenges seen and lessons learned over time, and brief examples of how we currently get participants thinking and acting on race, gender, class, privilege, and other facets of identity in an intersectional, allied way.

Published in: Education, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
748
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
171
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Developing Social Change Leaders: Practices and Perspectives on Fostering an Intersectional Approach to Identity and Social Justice

  1. 1. Developing Social Change Leaders: Practices and Perspectives on Fostering an Intersectional Approach Tuesday, August 6, 2013 11am-12pm PDT
  2. 2. Our Story • Founded in the early 1990s by a multiracial coalition of organizations uniting to respond to growing intergroup tensions and violence • First LDIR cohort graduated from a 9-month program in 1992, a few weeks after the Los Angeles 1992 civil unrest
  3. 3. Values and Practices
  4. 4. From the beginning… • Early research informed the program’s paradigm around social change leadership • Sought to provide what others weren’t: a space for building analysis and skills, combined with the opportunity to practically apply both • Program curriculum was designed to support relationship building, dialogue, sharing of personal stories • Facilitation approach honored the knowledge in the group, supported a participatory growth process
  5. 5. Defining social change leadership • Committed to social justice • Emphasizes collaboration and relationship building— understands leadership as a collective process • Engages holistic and systemic strategies
  6. 6. Expanding our lens • A singular focus on race/ethnicity undermined the work • Supporting leadership from a social justice perspective required an intersectional approach to identity • Curriculum had to emphasize how privilege and power pivot around not only race/ethnicity, but also class, gender, sexual orientation, ability, nation of citizenship/immigration status, and religion
  7. 7. Dominant Group
  8. 8. Keeping best practices • Dedicate enough time and attention to preparation with facilitators, tailoring of curriculum, and participant demographics and dynamics • Recruit a diverse group of people to support a process of learning from one another’s lived experiences of privilege and oppression. If an identity is not represented, encourage the group to note how that may influence conversations • Facilitate in diverse teams—with different identities, communication styles, leadership styles • Create affinity spaces, with facilitators to support them • Emphasize discussion guidelines, allowing participants to brainstorm their own if time allows, or bringing preset guidelines
  9. 9. Keeping best practices • Start by building trust to pave the way for deeper processing around identity, privilege, power, and agency • Never assume prior understanding of the vocabulary used—build a shared understanding of concepts such as privilege, ally, cisgender, etc. • Expect and embrace conflict, supporting participants in using conflict as an opportunity to learn • Maintain flexibility, checking in with facilitation team throughout sessions to make changes to a curriculum per group needs • Always allow participants sufficient time to reflect and absorb, both individually and collectively, silently and aloud
  10. 10. Ways we work • Intensive series • Capacity-building • Consulting services and customized workshops • Public workshops
  11. 11. Intensive Series • Facilitation for Social Change • LDIRs in Health • Leadership for Social Change • Healing for Social Change
  12. 12. Central Valley Leadership for Social Change
  13. 13. Resource Highlight: Allyship 1. Self-awareness 2. Self-education 3. Creating and open and supportive environment 4. Taking action Allies understand the many layers of oppression, can identify positions of privilege they hold, and actively work to rectify inequity. They are committed to:
  14. 14. Healing for Social Change
  15. 15. Resource Highlight: Isms at Work A liberatory space is one that is free from racism, sexism, ableism, transphobia, heterosexism, classism, citizenship privilege, religious privilege, ageism and other –isms that affect our access to resources and our general safety in this society. We live in a context where all of the –isms are alive and well, which means the –isms are literally at work with us.
  16. 16. Capacity Building • Philadelphia, PA • Flint, MI • Central Valley, CA • Solano Coalition for Better Health • Gender Justice LA
  17. 17. Consulting Services • LA Public Health Department • Center for Nonprofit Management • Riverside Human Relations Commission
  18. 18. Public Workshops • Facilitating Intergroup Dialogue • Strategies to Manage Conflict • Supervising to Empower
  19. 19. Q&A
  20. 20. Thank you Keep in touch! ldir.org facebook.com/ldirprogram twitter @leaders4action activistsoul.tumblr.com linkedin.com/company/ldir

×