KELLY H A NNUM
C ENTER FOR C REA TIVE LEA DERSH IP
TIM LEISMA N
RESEA RC H CONSULTANT
STEP H ANIE WA LKER
IMP A C T G REEN...
Our Discussion
 How can social identity be raised
and addressed in community
leadership development programs?
 How can i...
Social Identity
…the parts of a person’s identity that
come from belonging to or being
associated with particular groups
i...
Functions of Social Identity
We use social identity to:
• Categorize people into groups,
• Identify with groups ourselves,...
Social Identity Basic Tenets
 We have multiple identities
 It’s human nature to want to “fit in” as
well as to be unique...
Social Identity Basic Tenets
(c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
 Identities can be associated with positive or negat...
Why it Matters
• Knowing which lenses you are seeing
through
• Increasing ability to access a broader
perspective
• Better...
The Need
(c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
The world is increasingly:
V = Volatile
U = Uncertain
C = Complex
A = Amb...
Leadership
Effective leadership results in Direction, Alignment, and
Commitment among people with shared goals or
challeng...
Leadership Development
 Everyone can develop leadership skills.
 Complex challenges are better served with diverse
leade...
Where interventions can occur
Societal
Community/
Regional
Organizational/
Institutional
Group
Individual
(c) 2013 Center ...
Project Overview and Goals
Develop and test a module based on social identity
concepts that fosters self-awareness, other-...
Our Starting Point
 Our own expertise and experiences
 Literature review
 Interviews
(c) 2013 Center for Creative Leade...
Design Considerations
 Level of Challenge
 Single versus multiple identity
 Start from commonalties or difference
 How...
Self-awareness
 Identifying multiple identities and intersectionality
 Identifying areas of integration as well as
incon...
Other-awareness
Articulating aspects of identity:
Given versus Chosen
Visible versus Invisible
Public versus Private
Pride...
Context-awareness
 Identifying the underlying faultlines in communities
and in work
 Understanding identity threat as we...
Self-Awareness
Multiple
Identities
Map
Chosen
Given
Core
(c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
Mapping Identities in Community
 How do social identities show up in organizational
and community groups? Which identitie...
Context: Greensboro, NC
(c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
IMPACT Greensboro
IMPACT Greensboro is a place-based leadership
program which invests in community participants for
the pu...
Underlying Process of IMPACT Greensboro
 Participant selection
 Leadership development training
 Facilitation
 Network...
Questions
 How can social identity be raised and
addressed in community leadership
development programs?
 How can ideas ...
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Making Social Identity Part of Community Leadership Development

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Shared and effective community leadership can be helped or hindered by our conceptions of and experiences with people from different identity groups. Add to that the reality that our experiences are embedded in larger social identity structures and dynamics within communities that in many cases are reinforcing negative patterns. So how can social identity best be raised and addressed in community leadership development programs? How can ideas about social identity expand our thinking about community and about leadership? We are on a journey to develop a curriculum that can serve as a resource to community leaders (and by leaders we mean everyone contributing to leadership, not just those with a formal leadership role). Specifically we aim to build awareness about social identity dynamics in people and communities to enhance the ability of individuals and groups to work together more effectively in order to achieve "common good" community outcomes.

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  • Kelly to kick it off 2 lines about why this work and connection to itTim 2 lines about why this work and connection to itStephanie2 lines about why this work and connection to it
  • STEPHANIEShared and effective community leadership can be helped or hindered by our conceptions of and experiences with people from different identity groups. Add to that the reality that our experiences are embedded in larger social identity structures and dynamics within communities that in many cases are reinforcing negative patterns. We are on a journey to develop a curriculum that can serve as a resource to community leaders (and by leaders we mean everyone contributing to leadership, not just those with a formal leadership role). Specifically we aim to build awareness about social identity dynamics in people and communities to enhance the ability of individuals and groups to work together more effectively in order to achieve "common good" community outcomes.Agenda:Share our context and perspective Hear your ideas Before we dive into these questions – we need to provide some context about what we mean by this and what our perspective is….
  • KELLY Social identity comes from relationships, structures, and systems. We co-construct and reinforce identity as well as the assumptions and implications of it. It’s not a new concept, but it is increasingly relevant (say more about why). Prominent theorists include Hogg, van Kipppenberg(sp?) Tajfel 1972
  • KELLY Social identity comes from relationships, structures, and systems. We co-construct and reinforce identity as well as the assumptions and implications of it. Note that internalized oppression based on SI occurs as well, mention identity threat. SI processes create the ingrou/out group US versus THEM Positive and negative stereotyping
  • KELLY
  • TIM Point 1: We form different perspectives based on our experiences, which are shaped by our identity. Similar to the elephant story where people describe the elephant based on which part they see/touch. I am in this world with a certain combination of identities and that shapes what I see, hear, touch, etc. Point 2: Broadening our perspective allows us to see the bigger pictures, gives us more options because we are aware of different ways to do things and can also think though differential impact (like it is not a good idea to call a car “Nova” if you want to sell it in Mexico). Point 3: Code shifting is not always an option. While single identity programs are helpful and provide value, we are simultaneously working across many different identities. Knowing which lenses you are seeing through enables you to reveal distortions and blind spots in your perspective.Increasing your ability to access a broader perspective is related to effectiveness at all levels.To be effective we have to navigate the complexity of social identities and take responsibility for helping to remove distortions to improve effectiveness for ourselves and others in order to achieve meaningful/sustainable outcomes
  • TIM V = Volatility. The nature and dynamics of change, and the nature and speed of change forces and change catalysts.U = Uncertainty. The lack of predictability, the prospects for surprise, and the sense of awareness and understanding of issues and events.C = Complexity. The multiplex of forces, the confounding of issues and the chaos and confusion that surround an organization.A = Ambiguity. The haziness of reality, the potential for misreads, and the mixed meanings of conditions; cause-and-effect confusion.A way to develop: Leaders at all levels, Diverse leaders, Leaders who can see and understand multiple perspectives,Leaders who contribute to and facilitate networked leadership,Leaders who can navigate complex systems,Leaders who understand the influence and impact of social identity.
  • TIMBased on an extensive review of leadership theory.CCL’s perspective is that effective leadership results in Direction, Alignment and Commitment among people with shared goals or challenges. Our view reflects a broader movement in the field that leadership is a process (not a trait a person has) and that leadership occurs among people (is plural).
  • TIM Our assumptions/perspective on LD. And while developing leadership goes beyond developing individual leaders, individual development is still a lever for change (change from within)
  • STEPHANIE (?) There are multiple complete systems that interact and leadership development can happen at any level. Naming the system(s) where you are doing the “work” is helpful because it establishes focus and clarifies which context is focal. Leadership development happens across these and other levels. Indeed to be most effective development/change would be aligned across them, but most LD efforts don’t have that amount of time or budget. For our work we wanted to focus on developing leadership in communities. Within communities: More diverse perspectives Goals/desired outcomes are often not co-created or equally endorsed or sharedSometimes uneven and less formal leadership structure
  • TIM Product description:At the Center for Creative Leadership we have used concepts based on social identity theory to foster self-awareness, other-awareness, and context-awareness to generate leadership processes that result in shared direction, alignment, and commitment. But we have not deeply explored this terrain, nor have we applied these concepts in community leadership. This project aims to do both by gathering and generating recommended content for leadership development initiatives and then selecting the most appropriate approach to further develop. We will then create a complete and tested curriculum focused on developing awareness and skills that enable individuals and groups to acknowledge, navigate, transcend social identities in for the identification and achievement of “common good” community outcomes.Our deliverable: One complete and tested curriculum focused on developing awareness and skills that enable individuals and groups to acknowledge, navigate, transcend social identities in for the identification and achievement of “common good” community outcomes.We include what is needed in the classroom as well as what is needed to support it We have a small team. We bring different perspectives and have interviewed practitioners and theorists to get a broader perspective/advice. We have also searched the literature to gather insights. And while there is some advantage to doing this work in a very different context, we thought it best to start from where we are and decided to test out our ideas in a context in which we are embedded. Because we have access, because we are more familiar with context, and also because it provides greater ability to follow-up and get feedback over time from different stakeholders.
  • TIM Our perspective ->Starting from the perspective that SID is important on every level for sustainable change.Literature review: given/chosen/core, triggers, power relations, agents/targets, sensitive topicInterview project: various people who study or practice these issues, or have experienced groups where they play out.Where we come to: each level of multiple whole needs its own analysis of SID, strengths/weaknesses
  • Kelly Safety versus comfort versus stretch(challenge) Single versus multiple identity focus (what outcome is sought, benefits/limits) Least common denominator to bring folks along versus boring/rehash to more knowledgeable folks Start from commonalties or difference How directly to address privilege/power Trust in the group, time it takes to buildBalancing the focus between individual work and system workCorrecting/fixing what’s “wrong” versus building what’s “right”
  • KELLYIdentity is not a monolith, the importance of mapping multiple identities,the exponential effect of intersectional identities(such as challenge/refute , accept/adopt, reframe/shape)
  • KELLY
  • KELLY
  • Kelly
  • Kelly
  • TIM Some of the items listed are just part of Greensborosmultifacted history. Depending on one’s SI – you may or may not know these things, you may have a different perspective on them, and they may evoke different ideas/emotions for you. You may (or may not) see connections, etc. The point is that what is surface may not be driving things, and that no one person or group has the whole story. It is a complex system of schools, community groups, business owners, political groups, educational institutions – and there is a history of intergroup relations that goes back centuries, along with new groups coming into the area all interacting. Complexity can be defined as situations in which how to achieve desired results is not known (high uncertainty), key stakeholders disagree about what to do and how to do it, and many factors are interacting in a dynamic environment that undermine efforts at control, making predictions and static models problematic. Complexity concepts include nonlinearity (small actions can produce large reactions), emergence (patterns emerge from self-organization among interacting agents), and dynamic adaptations (interacting elements and agents respond and adapt to each other).Number of languages (re: resettlement) Origin of the Underground Railroad Woolworth Sit InsCommunist Ku Klux Klan ShootingHosted the first Truth and Reconciliation Committee in the United StatesFormer textile powerhouseA resettlement cityHome to HBCUs, women’s colleges, public and private universities & colleges (we may want a collage of images here and talk through key events, facts)
  • STEPHANIE Look up report on LLC place-based leadership study.Change Agents define, research, plan, build support, and partner with others to create change. They have the courage and the willingness to do what is best for the community. IMPACT Greensboro develops a framework for dialogue that increases individuals’ capacity to work as Change Agents. The purpose of the Dialogue groups is not to develop projects, but to focus on personal strategies for leadership while in a group of diverse participants who reflect the make-up of the community. The building of social capital occurs in the large group sessions and the dialogue sessions. Participants explore and develop authentic relationships with other participants, who share a common community interest and who, through the program, help one another to identify ways they each can become more effective community leaders in their areas of interest. Create cooperative solutionsHonor diversityAct in the best interest of the groupNegotiate with transparencyGather multiple perspectivesEngage in self-reflection
  • STEPHANIE
  • TIM
  • Making Social Identity Part of Community Leadership Development

    1. 1. KELLY H A NNUM C ENTER FOR C REA TIVE LEA DERSH IP TIM LEISMA N RESEA RC H CONSULTANT STEP H ANIE WA LKER IMP A C T G REENSB ORO P ROG RA M, C C L Social Identity and Community Leadership Development (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
    2. 2. Our Discussion  How can social identity be raised and addressed in community leadership development programs?  How can ideas about social identity expand our thinking about community and about leadership? (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
    3. 3. Social Identity …the parts of a person’s identity that come from belonging to or being associated with particular groups including, but not limited to, age, ethnicity, race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, nationality, and socioeconomic status. (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
    4. 4. Functions of Social Identity We use social identity to: • Categorize people into groups, • Identify with groups ourselves, • Compare groups with each other, usually preferring our own groups to others. (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
    5. 5. Social Identity Basic Tenets  We have multiple identities  It’s human nature to want to “fit in” as well as to be unique  Some identities are visible, others are less apparent  We continually gain, lose, or change certain aspects of our identity, while others are fixed (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
    6. 6. Social Identity Basic Tenets (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership  Identities can be associated with positive or negative stereotypes  Social identities create a multifaceted lens through which we view the world and how we are viewed  Which identities are most salient will depend on context
    7. 7. Why it Matters • Knowing which lenses you are seeing through • Increasing ability to access a broader perspective • Better navigate complex situations and relationships (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
    8. 8. The Need (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership The world is increasingly: V = Volatile U = Uncertain C = Complex A = Ambiguous
    9. 9. Leadership Effective leadership results in Direction, Alignment, and Commitment among people with shared goals or challenges. (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
    10. 10. Leadership Development  Everyone can develop leadership skills.  Complex challenges are better served with diverse leaders working together.  Developing leadership goes beyond developing individual leaders. (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
    11. 11. Where interventions can occur Societal Community/ Regional Organizational/ Institutional Group Individual (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
    12. 12. Project Overview and Goals Develop and test a module based on social identity concepts that fosters self-awareness, other-awareness, and context-awareness to generate leadership processes that result in shared direction, alignment, and commitment in communities. (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
    13. 13. Our Starting Point  Our own expertise and experiences  Literature review  Interviews (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
    14. 14. Design Considerations  Level of Challenge  Single versus multiple identity  Start from commonalties or difference  How directly to address privilege/power  Trust in the group  Individual work versus system work  Fixing what’s “wrong” versus building what’s “right” (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
    15. 15. Self-awareness  Identifying multiple identities and intersectionality  Identifying areas of integration as well as incongruence  Understanding leader identity  Identifying ways we respond to external labeling (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
    16. 16. Other-awareness Articulating aspects of identity: Given versus Chosen Visible versus Invisible Public versus Private Pride versus shame Accepted/integrated versus disputed/incongruent Naming and challenging implicit leadership assumptions Understanding respect and the connection to identity salience (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
    17. 17. Context-awareness  Identifying the underlying faultlines in communities and in work  Understanding identity threat as well as positive and negative stereotyping.  Awareness of triggers of social identity tension and conflict  Mapping social identity networks (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
    18. 18. Self-Awareness Multiple Identities Map Chosen Given Core (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
    19. 19. Mapping Identities in Community  How do social identities show up in organizational and community groups? Which identities are “at the table?”  How do our identities impact how we see the work?  How do the identities of those doing community work reflect the identities of those intended to benefit from or may be harmed by that work? (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
    20. 20. Context: Greensboro, NC (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
    21. 21. IMPACT Greensboro IMPACT Greensboro is a place-based leadership program which invests in community participants for the purpose of building social capital. The goal of IMPACT Greensboro is to create a vibrant network of community “Change Agents” who are equipped to identify and tackle community issues. (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
    22. 22. Underlying Process of IMPACT Greensboro  Participant selection  Leadership development training  Facilitation  Network of Change Agents (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership
    23. 23. Questions  How can social identity be raised and addressed in community leadership development programs?  How can ideas about social identity expand our thinking about community and about leadership? (c) 2013 Center for Creative Leadership

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