H4H Hale

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A project completed for a Habitat for Humanity single-family sustainable residence.

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H4H Hale

  1. 1. SARAH MORRIS ARCH 322 Spring 2012 Professor C. Bergum University of Hawaii at Manoa
  2. 2. Truro Beach House Architect: Zero Energy Design  Foam Insulation  PV Panels  Maximize Light Efficiency  Indigenous Plants  Renewable Furniture  Low – No VOC Materials  Permeable DrivewayYannell Residence Architect: Farr Associates Butterfly Roof Permeable Pavement Recycled Contents The Lighthouse UK Low Flow Water Features Architect: Sheppard Robson Zero VOC Paints  High Performance Structural Insulated Panels (SIPS)  Pitched Roof with Solar Panels  Water Efficient Features
  3. 3.  The H4H Hale is a proposal for Honolulu, Hawaii to utilized for future Habitat for Humanity construction projects utilizing innovative technologies, basic passive methods, and considerations of landscape and neighborhood into the design. The H4H Hale addresses the natural trade winds provided through topography, moderate to heavy rainfalls seasonally, and sunlight opportunities. This design also adheres to a multitude of LEED objectives to reduce the overall impact of the carbon footprint. This simple home alters the basics and creates a uniquely intimate residence on the corner of the local neighborhood Papalokea, ready for its new family. The design features that I introduced in this design to reduce the effects of construction include: aluminum louvers, indigenous plants, indoor plants, low-flow water features, maximize light efficiency, natural ventilation, photo voltaic panels, porous pavement, repurposed furnishings, spray foam insulation, rainwater catchment, vinyl siding, water catchment system, and zero VOC paints. The orientation of the structure maximizes the use of wind. Whereby, when the windows are opened, every room is designed to be able to redirect air. With two windows in each bedroom and living space, the opportunity for natural ventilation is enhanced, in addition, a wind tunnel opportunity from air descending from the northern elevations envelopes the southern facade. The landscaping creates shading and privacy from neighbors, if needed, to enjoy the outdoor space created. The concrete slab for the outdoor space is a porous pavement, which can absorb water and redirect into irrigation pipes below into the watch catchment system or into the local runoff system. The blue containers are recycling bins, which allow the homeowner to sort recyclable as needed. Having a glass door that leads out to the covered exterior courtyard gives a sense of additional space, without the additional square footage. This space provides a nice gathering moment for friends and family. The glass door not only acts as a passage to access the back yard, but permits wind to infiltrate. Even on heavy rain days, the designed retaining wall can deflect the quantity, while allowing excess to permeate through the porous aspect of the concrete. And keeping in mind the accessibility for all users, a small sloped ramp is provided. The front exemplifies the use of vinyl siding, green vertical trellis’, a bike rack, photo voltaic panels, local lava rocks, and landscaping to control erosion. The use of vinyl is apparent on the siding and decking. Vinyl is a low cost option with low maintenance, while providing a clean aesthetic to the home. The decking ramped up, is raised 1 foot to give a bit of aesthetic and protection from the heavy rains. For cooler days, the warmth is maintained, without air infiltration, due to the application of spray foam insulation. The vertical trellis’ can provide owners the option to grow vegetation as well as reducing the heat gain. The bike rack is a nice option for the owner and company who choose to ride over or who catch the local bus. The photovoltaic panels help reduce energy costs while catching the warm western rays. The interior space creates a well-lit atmosphere for an intimate gathering, as the elongated fixed windows frame the west landscaped views. Heat gain is also reduced with the assistance of non-mechanical aluminum louvers which provide shade or glare onto the windows. By providing indoor plants, not only provides a beautiful aesthetic, but also decreases the airborne pollutants that can cause poor indoor air quality.
  4. 4.  Address: 580 Auwaiolimu Street City, St: Honolulu, HI 96813 Neighborhood: Papakolea TMK: 24041020 Lot Sq. Ft.: 7,396 Latitude: +21.30694 (21°1824.984"N) Longitude: -157.85833 (157°5129.988"W)
  5. 5.  Address: 580 Auwaiolimu Street  City, St: Honolulu, HI 96813  Neighborhood: Papakolea  TMK: 24041020  Lot Sq. Ft.: 7,396  Latitude: +21.30694 (21°1824.984"N)  Longitude: -157.85833 (157°5129.988"W) SUN PATH DIAGRAM TEMPURATURES & RAINFALL WIND DIRECTIONShttp://www.gaisma.com/en/location/h http://www.usclimatedata.com/climate.php?location=US http://www.windfinder.com/windstats/windstonolulu-hawaii.html HI0026 atistic_honolulu_airport.htm
  6. 6.  Address: 580 Auwaiolimu Street City, St: Honolulu, HI 96813 Neighborhood: Papakolea TMK: 24041020 Lot Sq. Ft.: 7,396 Latitude: +21.30694 (21°1824.984"N) Longitude: -157.85833 (157°5129.988"W)
  7. 7.  Address: 580 Auwaiolimu Street  City, St: Honolulu, HI 96813  Neighborhood: Papakolea  TMK: 24041020  Lot Sq. Ft.: 7,396  Latitude: +21.30694 (21°1824.984"N)  Longitude: -157.85833 (157°5129.988"W)DESIGN FEATURES Aluminum Louvers Indigenous Plants N Low Flow Water Features Maximize Light Efficiency Natural Ventilation Photo Voltaic Panels Porous Pavement Repurposed Furnishings Spray Foam Insulation Vinyl Siding and Decking Water Catchment System Zero VOC Paints
  8. 8.  Address: 580 Auwaiolimu Street  City, St: Honolulu, HI 96813  Neighborhood: Papakolea  TMK: 24041020  Lot Sq. Ft.: 7,396  Latitude: +21.30694 (21°1824.984"N)  Longitude: -157.85833 (157°5129.988"W)NORTH ELEVATION EAST ELEVATIONWEST ELEVATION SOUTH ELEVATION
  9. 9.  Address: 580 Auwaiolimu Street  City, St: Honolulu, HI 96813  Neighborhood: Papakolea  TMK: 24041020  Lot Sq. Ft.: 7,396  Latitude: +21.30694 (21°1824.984"N)  Longitude: -157.85833 (157°5129.988"W) NEAST – WEST SECTIONSOUTH - NORTH SECTIONWEST – EAST SECTION
  10. 10.  Address: 580 Auwaiolimu Street  City, St: Honolulu, HI 96813  Neighborhood: Papakolea  TMK: 24041020  Lot Sq. Ft.: 7,396  Latitude: +21.30694 (21°1824.984"N)  Longitude: -157.85833 (157°5129.988"W)N
  11. 11.  Address: 580 Auwaiolimu Street  City, St: Honolulu, HI 96813  Neighborhood: Papakolea  TMK: 24041020  Lot Sq. Ft.: 7,396  Latitude: +21.30694 (21°1824.984"N)  Longitude: -157.85833 (157°5129.988"W)FRONT SOUTHWEST EXTERIOR BACK NORTHEAST EXTERIORINTERIOR VIEW OF KITCHEN INTERIOR VIEW OF LIVINGROOM
  12. 12.  Address: 580 Auwaiolimu Street  City, St: Honolulu, HI 96813  Neighborhood: Papakolea  TMK: 24041020  Lot Sq. Ft.: 7,396  Latitude: +21.30694 (21°1824.984"N)  Longitude: -157.85833 (157°5129.988"W)N
  13. 13.  Address: 580 Auwaiolimu Street  City, St: Honolulu, HI 96813  Neighborhood: Papakolea  TMK: 24041020  Lot Sq. Ft.: 7,396  Latitude: +21.30694 (21°1824.984"N)  Longitude: -157.85833 (157°5129.988"W) ALUMINUM LOUVERSSUSTAINABLE FEATURES  Prevents unwanted solar heat gain Natural Ventilation  Reduce 60%-90% of UV rays Indigenous Plants  Reduce electricity bills Re-purposed Furnishings  Window thermal performance increased about Porous Pavement 15% Insulated Vinyl Siding Aluminum Awnings Photo Voltaic Panels Spray Foam Insulation Rainwater Catchment/Storm Kokio ke‘oke‘o Water Control Hibiscus arnottianus Zero VOC Paints ‘Ōhi‘a Low-Flow Water Fixtures Metrosideros spp. Maximize Light Efficiency Naio Myoporum sandwicense
  14. 14.  Address: 580 Auwaiolimu Street  City, St: Honolulu, HI 96813  Neighborhood: Papakolea  TMK: 24041020  Lot Sq. Ft.: 7,396  Latitude: +21.30694 (21°1824.984"N)  Longitude: -157.85833 (157°5129.988"W)SUSTAINABLE FEATURES Natural Ventilation Indigenous Plants Re-purposed Furnishings Porous Pavement Insulated Vinyl Siding Aluminum Awnings Photo Voltaic Panels Spray Foam Insulation Rainwater Catchment/Storm Water Control Zero VOC Paints Low-Flow Water Fixtures Maximize Light Efficiency • Captures, filters and reduces storm water runoff • Eliminates need for ponds, swales, and other storm water management devices – thus reducing initial construction costs • LEED applicable: • Storm water Management (6) • Minimize Site Disturbance (SS 5) • Local (M 5) • Recycled Content (M 4): fly ash, slag cement, or silica fume substitute for cement • Cool (SS 7): Reduces heat island effect
  15. 15. NNATURAL VENTILATION DIAGRAM FLOOR PLAN NATURAL VENTILATION DIAGRAM SECTION
  16. 16. N
  17. 17. Roof R Air Film Outside, Summer, 7.5 mph 0.25 Grey Asphalt Shingle 0/30 lbs felt 0.44 1/2” Douglas Fir Plywood 0.62 N 3”-8” Airspace 1.00 12” Thermal Batt Insulation 38.00 ½ Gypsum Wood Board 0.32 Air Film Inside 0.92 Roof Average 41.55 Wall Air Film Outside, Winter, 15 mph 0.17 1 1-2” Prodigy Insulated Vinyl Siding 5.00 1/2” Structural Plywood 0.62 ½” Air Space 0.90 12” Thermal Batt Insulation 0.0 - 38.00 Repurposed Douglas Fir Stud 1.25 - 0.0 ½” Gypsum Wood Board 0.45 Air Film 0.68 Stud / Batt = 1.25 / 45.82 Wall Average = 5.91 / 40.65U = 1/∑R Entry DoorU = 1/41.55+40.65+15.93+42.53 Air Film Outside 0.25U = 1/140.66 Single, Metal Insulating (2" w/ urethane) 15.00U = 7.1 Inside Air Indoor 0.68 Door Average = 15.93 Floor Air Film Inside (Horizontal, Upward, Non-Reflective) 0.92 Carpet (fibrous pad) 2.08 5/8” Douglas Fir Plywood 0.77 3” Air Space 0.0 - 1.00 2X8 @ 16” 8.3 - 0.0 12” Thermal Batt Insulation 38.00 ½” Douglas Fir Plywood 0.62 Outside Air 0.17 Stud / Batt 11.46 / 43.56 Floor Average 42.53
  18. 18. Heating Load Calculations Honolulu, HI Design DB/WD Daily Range CDD50F SummerN 87.8/73.1 12.4 9949 A u ΔT = 65 – 62.8 Peak Hourly Load Roof 1054.00 .0241 2.2°F 963.95 Btuh Walls 337.17 .0239 2.2°F 145.02 Btuh Door Entry 21.00 .1464 2.2°F 6.76 Btuh Floor 1920.34 .0985 2.2°F 416.23 Btuh Infiltration .018 .25 19203.40 190.11 Btuh Total Btuh 686.64
  19. 19. 1. Change Glass to Heat absorbing Double Glass Savings Glass Door N (A=40sf) (ΔDCLF = 3˚F) 120 BtuhN Glass Door E-W (A=20sf) (ΔDCLF = 2˚F) 40 Btuh Glass Door S (A=46sf) (ΔDCLF = 2˚F) 92 Btuh 2. Add Radiant Barrier to Roof & Walls, Cool Roof, Green Wall E/W: Roof (u = 0.0023)(A = 988sf)(DETD = 31°F) 704 Btuh Old Roof 1,274 Btuh Savings 570 Btuh Walls E (u = 0.038)(A = 247sf)(DETD = 13°F) + W (u = 0.0588)(A = 113sf)(DETD = 23°F) + W (u = 0.0588)(A = 78sf)(DETD = 13°F) 387 Btuh Old 695 Btuh Savings 298 Btuh Walls N (u = 0.058)(A = 268sf)(DETD = 13) 202 Btuh Old 240 Btuh Savings 38 Btuh Walls S (u = 0.058)(A = 258sf)(DETD = 16) 241 Btuh Old 288 Btuh Savings 47 Btuh Sensible Savings 1,199 Btuh Latent Savings 360 Btuh Sensible + Latent Savings 1,559 Btuh 3a. Add Natural Cross- Ventilation Cooling 9,250 Btuh
  20. 20. Cooling Load Calculations Honolulu Design DB/WD Daily Range CDD50F Summer N 87.8/73.1 12.4 9949 u A DETD BTUH Rentable Space 0.0241 1054.00 38 963.95 Walls N 0.0239 740.71 8 141.59 Walls E-W 0.0239 337.17 18 145.02 Wall S 0.0239 448.33 11 117.84 Glass Door S 21.00 14 294.00 Floor 0.0985 1920.34 0 0.00 Infiltration 1054 1 1054.00 #of Person BTUH/p Occupants 4 230 920.00 Lights 100.00 Equipment 1200 Total Sensible 4936.40 Latent Gains 987.28Sources: Total Latent and Sensible Heat Gains 5923.681. Textbook, Table F.5 p16542. Textbook, Table F.6 p16563. Textbook, Table F.7 p16574. Textbook, Table F.8 p16575. Textbook Table F. 8.33 p. 285
  21. 21. Catchment Use Honolulu, HI annual rainfall is 21 in. Design Rainfall is 2/3 x 21in. = 14 in. Single Family Usage is 50 gal/person x 4 persons x 365 days = 73,000 gal Fig 20.5 (a) 1,664 SF Catchment area = 12,000 gal or 16.4% (of total usage)N Water Conserving toilet @ 1.8 gal x 4 person x 3/day = 22 gal x 365 = 8,030 gal (This leaves 12,000-8,030 gal, or, 3,970 gal/yr. for irrigation / storage) (Use rainwater to supply toilet & balance to irrigation) Cistern Capacity Honolulu, HI annual rainfall breakdown per season is: Winter 8.65 in Spring 2.40 in Summer 1.80 in Autumn 7.78 in Since seasonal variation exists, a 60 day supply capacity is calculated to be: Volume = 3970 gal /6 mo. = 662 gal. capacity cistern Size of cistern = 662 gal / 7.48 gal /ft3 = 89 ft3 = (2) x 2.67ft. dia. X 8ft. tall tanks

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