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  • 1. Determining the Authority of Sources<br />With the large amount of information available today, determining if a source is valid is difficult.<br />Just because it is published on the web or in a magazine does not mean the information is valid.<br />Not all information sources are equal.<br />
  • 2. Determining Authority and Validity of Web Pages<br />How do you know that the information you found online is valid?<br />
  • 3. Evaluating Magazines<br />
  • 4. There are different kinds of magazines.<br />Popular magazines :<br />·Newsweek <br />·Business week<br />·Popular Mechanics<br />Scholarly journals such as<br />Oxford English Journal <br />Information Management Journal<br />ABA Journal<br />Scholarly journals are more authoritative and because the material is written for a specific professional audience. They often provide the best sources.<br />Magazines and Journals<br />
  • 5. Popular Magazines<br />
  • 6. Scholarly Journals<br />
  • 7. Which Source is Best? <br />What kind of information do you need?<br />Background material<br />Information for your paper<br />News<br />Definition of a term<br />Opinions on a topic<br />Scholarly articles<br />
  • 8. What is Your Topic?<br />local or regional?<br />popular in the current news ?<br />something that has been discussed for a while? <br />How much information is available on your topic?<br />scientific or medical?<br />Are there legal aspects of your topic?<br />
  • 9. Additional Considerations<br />If your topic is new within the last few months, you may not be able to find scholarly articles on it.<br />If it is very popular, the amount of information may be overwhelming.<br />Where can you find the best information available<br />on your topic?<br />
  • 10. How do you determine if an article is biased?<br />
  • 11. There are several factors that may indicate a bias.<br />
  • 12. Ask yourself the following questions to determine bias.<br />
  • 13. •With what political, social or religious group does the author identify ?•<br />
  • 14. Does the writer have anything personally to gain from the message?<br />
  • 15. Is the writer selling or otherwise promoting something?<br />
  • 16. What sources does the author use? Are they credible? What about their statistics? Are they credible?<br />
  • 17. •Does the author mention more than one point of view of the issue? •Does he or she respectfully acknowledge opposing opinions?<br />
  • 18. Although nearly everything has a little bias, avoiding anything that is heavily slanted as noted in the previous questions is important.<br />
  • 19. Use common senseAuthorDateAuthor’s backgroundSourcesBias<br />

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