Young Adults with Asperger's Syndrome in the Workplace

  • 250 views
Uploaded on

This slide deck was presented at the 2014 Pacific Rim International Conference on Disability and Diversity. It explores methods and strategies for successful job development, placement and retention …

This slide deck was presented at the 2014 Pacific Rim International Conference on Disability and Diversity. It explores methods and strategies for successful job development, placement and retention of young adults with Asperger's Syndrome in competitive employment.

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
250
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3

Actions

Shares
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Young  Adult  Asperger’s  in  the   Workplace   Rob  Crawford   Pacific  Rim  Conference  on  Disability  &  Diversity   May  19,  2014  
  • 2. What  Do  Employers  Want?  
  • 3. Top  10  Employer-­‐Reported   Skills  Needs     1.  Work  in  a  team   2.  Make  decisions  and  solve  problems   3.  Plan,  organize  and  priori<ze  work   4.  Communicate  verbally  with  people  inside  and                  outside  an  organiza<on   5.      Obtain  and  process  informa<on   6.      Analyze  quan<ta<ve  data   7.    Technical  knowledge  related  to  the  job   8.    Proficiency  with  computer  soNware  programs   9.    Create  and/or  edit  wriQen  reports   10.Sell  and  influence  others   •  Forbes  2013  
  • 4. Diversityinc’s   2014   Top  10   Employers     for  DisabiliOes  
  • 5. 5 KPMG:  Becoming  Disability  Confident   All  KPMG  member  firms  have  an  opportunity  to  challenge  percep<ons  surrounding   disability  as  it  is  understood  by  society  today.  By  becoming  a  disability  confident   organiza<on  as  a  whole,  we  have  the  chance  to  focus  on  ability  and  how  it  can  benefit  our   firm.     KPMG’s  goal  is  to  become  disability  confident  both  locally  and  globally.     What  does  it  mean  to  be  disability  confident?    Understanding  how  disability  affects  business  both  ways  –  as  a  cost   and  as  an  opportunity  for  businesses  services  and  connec<ons    Crea<ng  a  culture  of  inclusion  that  removes  physical  and  a^tudinal   barriers  for  people  with  disabili<es    Making  reasonable  adjustments  which  enable  specific  individuals  to   contribute  as  employees  and  clients    Focusing  on  the  opportunity  to  employ  and  support  differently-­‐ abled  people  and  bring  the  best  capaci<es  to  the  forefront    Ensure  transparency,  encourage  best  prac<ce  thinking  and  align   with  business  strategy  
  • 6. Today’s Important Numbers- 80%<20 90% 10.5 million
  • 7. Controlled,  Predictable  &     Sensory-­‐Balanced  Work  Environment  
  • 8. What  the  ADA  says  about  AS   •  That  it  must  be  a  substan<al  impairment   •  That  the  person  must  be  qualified  for  the  job   •  That  the  person  must  be  able  to  perform  the   essen<al  func<ons  of  a  job  with  or  without  a   reasonable  accommoda<on   •  A  person  must  disclose  the  disability  to   receive  accommoda<ons   •  The  accommoda<ons  must  be  reasonable  and   not  present  and  undue  hardship      
  • 9. In  the  work  world,  considera<on  for   accommoda<ons  is  not  based  on   whether  the  worker  has  a  disability,   but  whether  they  have  one   UNDER  THE  LAW  
  • 10. Jakubowski  v.  Christ  Hosp.  Inc.,  6th   Cir.,  No.  09-­‐4097  (Dec.  8,  2010).   •  While  the  ADA  prevents  an  employer  from  discriminatorily  termina<ng  an   otherwise  qualified  individual  on  the  basis  of  a  disability,  Jakubowski  was   unable  to  prove  that  he  was  otherwise  qualified  to  successfully  complete   his  residency,  because  his  proposed  accommoda<on  did  not  directly   improve  his  ability  to  communicate  with  co-­‐workers  and  pa<ents.   According  to  the  6th  Circuit,  a  plain<ff  has  the  burden  of  proving  that  he   will  be  “capable  of  performing  the  essen<al  func<ons  of  the  job  with  the   proposed  accommoda<on,”  and  Jakubowski  was  unable  to  do  that.   Therefore,  he  could  not  proceed  with  his  ADA  claims.     •  This  holding  does  not  excuse  employers  from  par<cipa<ng  in  the   interac<ve  process  by  engaging  in  a  reasonable  discussion  of   accommoda<ons  proposed  by  an  employee  with  a  disability.  It  does,   however,  indicate  that  unless  an  impaired  individual  can  describe  and   request  an  accommoda<on  that  allows  him  or  her  to  perform  the   essen<al  func<ons  of  the  job,  that  individual  cannot  support  a  lawsuit   under  the  ADA.    
  • 11. What  are  Some  of  the  Typical   Workplace  Challenges  Adults  with   AS  Face?  
  • 12. Social  Thinking  &  CommunicaOon  
  • 13. Sensory  IntegraOon  
  • 14. OrganizaOon  &  Task  Management  
  • 15. What’s  Missing?   •  Individuals  with  AS  are  unaware  of  how  to  determine  if   their  KSA’s  match  posi<on     •  Employers  are  not  well  informed  on  AS   •  Individuals  with  AS  are  not  prepared  to  be  effec<ve  self-­‐ advocates   •  Employers  are  ill-­‐equipped  to  determine  accommoda<ons   •  Neither  has  not  been  taught  how  to  determine   accommoda<ons  based  on  task  
  • 16. What  are  Some  Useful  Strategies    for  Workplace  Challenges?  
  • 17. What  is  the  Person  with  AS’  Understanding  of   CompeOOve  Employment?   •  Wants  to  work?   •  Mo<vated  to  learn  new  skills?   •  Open  to  construc<ve  feedback?   •  Willing  to  take  responsibility  for  their  ac<ons/ reac<ons?   •  Willing  to  work  on  issues  that  arise?   •  CommiQed  to  being  on  <me,  doing  their  best  in   everything  they  do,  and  to  make  sacrifices?   •  Able  to  handle  a  reasonable  amount  of  stress?   •  Willingness  to  disclose  AS  work-­‐related  issues?  
  • 18. SituaOonal  Assessment  Focus  Areas   Types  of  workplace  behaviors  to  be  observed  and  assessed   1.  Ability  to  get  along  with  co-­‐workers/staff   2.  Ability  to  follow  direc<ons   3.  Ability  to  learn  new  tasks   4.  Speed  of  work   5.  Accuracy  of  work   6.  Frustra<on  tolerance   7.  Safety   8.  Mo<va<on   9.  Ability  to  follow  complex  direc<ons  
  • 19. Looking  at  FuncOonal  Assets/LimitaOons   RelaOve  to  a  Specific  Seng   •  Must  know  how  personal  skills,  abiliOes,  training,  educaOon,  and   experience  relate  to  specific  posiOon  within  the  company   •  IdenOfy  essenOal  funcOons  &  environmental  consideraOons  of  job   •  IdenOfy  potenOal  funcOonal  assets  &  limitaOons   •  What  CAMS  are  pracOcal  &  reasonable  for  this  employer?   •  How  or  will  I  disclose?  
  • 20. Speak  in  a  Direct  &  Clear  Manner   Statements  w/  implied  meanings   •  Are  you  going  to  work  on            the  database  assignment?   •  Brian,  you’re  the  last  one  leaving   today.   •  I  feel  like  lunch.   •  We  are  behind  schedule  on  the   Jacob’s  job.   Direct  statements   •  I  want  you  to  work  on  the  database   assignment.   •  Please  put  the  alarm  on  because   you  are  the  last  to  leave  the  office.   •  I’m  hungry,  let’s  go  out  for  lunch.   •  You  are  going  to  have  to  stay  late  to   meet  the  deadline.  
  • 21. State  ExpectaOon  &  Show  How  to   Meet  It   •  Become  giNed  at  sta<ng  the  obvious:   – Deadlines-­‐<me  frames,  schedules,  etc.   – Outcomes-­‐  what  they  look  like,  format,  etc.   – Behavior-­‐  dress,  hygiene,  appropriate   conversa<on  topics,  unwriQen  workplace  rules    
  • 22. Self-­‐Accommoda<on   Au<s<c  Jihad   •  Please  Knock  On  The  Door  Before  Entering.   •  Please  be  so  kind  as  to  knock  on  the  door  before  entering  as   I  am  very  easily  startled  and  I  do  not  wish  to  die  prematurely   as  a  result  of  a  heart  a`ack.     •  Also,  I  have  no  wish  to  conduct  an  uncontrolled  experiment   with  an  un-­‐capped  syringe  full  of  Uranium  salts…  ;)                            -­‐  Carlos  
  • 23. In  case  of  emergency:   Rob  Crawford   Life  Development  InsOtute   www.lifedevelopmenOnsOtute.org   rcrawford@life-­‐development-­‐inst.org   (623)  773-­‐2774,  ext.  217  
  • 24. Employer  Resources