What’s the Game Plan?Postsecondary considerations for  Young adults with disabilities              Rob Crawford       Life...
As a society, we have come a longway with regards to howWe view and treat people livingwith the experience of disabilities
SINFUL &CURSED
SICKNESS
BROKEN
SOCIALMODEL
Higher education andpostsecondary participation     rates are increasing            Crawford 2010
Crawford 2010
Adult students with disabilities     demographics changing              Crawford 2010
Crawford 2010
Educational achievement is not apredictor of a well-prepared employee Extensive training in “soft skills” increases cost o...
Workplace skill demands raises bar toemployment for people with disabilities   These are not embedded skills in the curren...
The Business Case for Disability EmploymentInclusion “Includes” People with Disabilities!   •In the US, one out of 8 peopl...
However, it is a minority groupwith unacceptably high levels      of unemployment             Crawford 2010
Employment Statistics for Youth Out of School > 1 yr                       (NLTS2 Wave 3, 2005) Condition LD            ED...
Source: BLS 2012
Each year,    over 200 billion dollarsis spent in entitlements ratherthan on training/employment             Crawford 2010
Crawford 2010
Formal assessment lessons/materials
Informational InterviewCompany         Custom Cactus         Jo Ann       Bunger Steel:       Suft        Aurotek:Name:   ...
Uncertainties                                       Getting a JobOutcomes       I won’t be able to      I’ll get a job but...
SUB DOMAIN/COMPETENCY               SUB-COMPETENCY/MAJOR LIFE DEMAND1. Selecting and Managing a Household      1 Maintain ...
Informal checklists with performance standards
Life Development Institutewww.lifedevelopmentinstitute.org(623)773-2774
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities

2,012 views
1,890 views

Published on

This slideshow covers latest data, research, and best practices in programming, services, and transition for young adults in hidden disabilities, such as LD, ADHD, Asperger's, and NLD.

Published in: Education, Career
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,012
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
512
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Note: World Health Organization 2012 global incidence rate is estimated at 1,100,000,000 (1 billion 1 hundred million) PWD
  • 2012BLS stats show 24 million working-age Americans (age 21-64) report having a disability
  • This is a “force multiplyer” when considering inclusion of friends, relatives, and neighbors could also swing a disability user-friendly business substantially more dollars and market share through branding themselves in this manner.
  • An untapped pool of voters, especially through greater use of mail in and absentee balloting- provided there is a candidate who chooses to reach out and identify with PWD.
  • We are talking about the societal stigma of being viewed as the “Other”
  • DISABILITY = Something you or family did to offend God and you are being punished. Back in the day, you were destroyed or cast out from the tribe/villiageMovie 300Ugly lawsBased as they are on misinformation, these attitudes about disability and the disabled reflect fear, embarrassment, guilt, anger, prejudice, or lack of caring.
  • Disability as illness = social security, it can be cured we have can treat it, must be taken care of, like a childLegal sterilizations perfomeduntil 1978 in 32 states legal against wishes of the person with disabilityInstitutionalization for dyslexia called “word blindness” “minimal brain damage/dysfunction” “organic brain syndrome”These lead to equating disability with something negative or wrong—a valuation which easily attaches to the individual.
  • Rehabilitation model = need to and can be fixed, unable to take care of self Disability & disorders- DSM manuals & categoriesSo that the disabled personis seen as negative, diseased, incomplete, unworthy of living, or someone to be ignored or discarded. Social model of disability- it is not the person who is disabled, but the environmental conditions society puts on us or expects us to accept that are the disabling aspects
  • In Europe, and to some extent across the planet, disability is a political force similar to the Women’s Liberation, Farm Workers and Black Power movements. It places the condition first to identify itself as a community and culture.
  • These data sets are based on self-disclosure of college students with disabilities. It would not be a major assumption to state that the actual rates are much higher, but due to many PWD not comfortable or skilled in self-advocacy, are officially reported at approximately 10% of the total college population.
  • Of note, is the feedback from the business community that what is needed are behavior-based skills, as opposed to passing high stakes exit exams or having a high GPA out of college.
  • One of two national awareness campaigns to showcase the skills, talents, and contributions PWD make everyday in the workplace.
  • Great workplace support that is purpose-built for IBM, who are considering developing 3rd party applications for other businesses
  • The most troubling aspect of this table (besides the overall low rates of employment), is the lack of disclosure by those with hidden or non-apparent conditions that could enable them to perform at higher levels with less anxiety.
  • The Department of Labor has only been reporting disability-specific employment data since 2009. The trendline has not changes significantly during this period, as it is basically double the rate of non-disabled workers.
  • The US seems to prefer pensioning off PWD, rather than working towards including them in meaningful employment. An example of this situation would be the federal budget of FY 2012, where the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) as the federal resources for state Vocational Rehabilitation programs was funded nationally with 2 billion dollars.
  • May 12, 2010Brookings Institution Young Americans are lengthening their transitions into adulthood, including the time it takes to leave their parents' homes, complete school, enter the workforce, marry and have children. An examination of changes in the process of attaining familial independences finds that parents currently spend about 10 percent of their annual income helping their children begin adult lives.According to the study, this more gradual assumption of responsibility seems to be both a function of the current economy and parents’ protectiveness. In the 1970s, 69 percent of men and 81 percent of women age 25 lived independently. At the turn of the century, those figures had dipped to 33 percent of men and 47 percent of women living independently.The study concludes that young Americans are more similar to young adults of the 1900s than the baby-boom generation; they are living at home longer, are earning lower wages and are relying on their parents’ financial support. This heavier reliance on parents poses the risk of overburdening families, especially those in impoverished circumstances. The researchers stress that the longer transition to adulthood strains the social institutions that traditionally guided young Americans to adulthood. They suggest strengthening these residential colleges and universities, community colleges, military service and national service programs.The study was published in the Spring 2010 volume of Transition to Adulthood, a peer-reviewed journal published by a partnership between the Brookings Institution and Princeton University. Findings are based on data collected by the MacArthur Research Network on Transitions to Adulthood.Read the study.
  • Major Adult Life Domains: The focus of Transition planning for students, parents, educators, and related professionals. LDI bases it’s programs and services on developing coursework, supportive practices, and outcomes on these specific areas of adult functioning.
  • Dr. Mary Cronin and Dr. James Patton developed this methodology as a way that schools and programs could infuse or embed transition content into traditional academy coursework. LDI adapted this process in the development of tools and techniques used to assess student skill development from a functional perspective.
  • This approach is focused on establishing local cultural relevance, available services, resources and daily life activities that all young and not-so-young adults need to know/practice/master to be better prepared to join the larger adult community upon exiting secondary and postsecondary settings.
  • Top: LDI student jazzed about graduating from collegeBottom: LDI students displaying their high school diplomas earned through the Institute’s fully accredited program.
  • LDI uses a combination of objective, quantitative instruction that are national in scope such as earning ACT’s National Career Readiness Certificates. These data are used for both local comparisons of LDI student achievement as well as seeing how they stack up nationally against all competition.
  • Atomic Learning offers tremendous variety and complexity for both students and professional staff in sharpening and upgrading their computer technology skills. Since it is skill-based and normed for a national population, LDI students get a double bump by virtue of their own personal expertise as well as seeing where they fit in in the larger picture.
  • Some of the many lessons from the ACT Work Keys and Career Ready 101 which focus on workforce development competencies that LDI student practice and master to some level during their instruction at the Institute. These skills speak to earlier slides where employers stated clearly what they need and is missing from young adults entering the workplace.
  • Top: LDI is able to offer transferable elective and general education college courses at its facility through a linkage with Paradise Valley Community College. Students also attend community-based colleges in the Phoenix metro area, which has the largest community college and workforce development system in the US.Bottom: LDI students preparing to go to a job fair where they utilize pre-employment skills and strategies in actual job seeking roles, rather than just practice them in a controlled classroom.
  • LDI example of how students make live calls to potential employers to learn more about what the entry-level requirements would be for a targeted occupation or career. This technique allows students to easily record and do side-by-side comparisons of potential jobs they have the interests, abilities, and aptitudes to successfully pursue.
  • There is a comprehensive vocational research project completed by students while they are figuring out and determining an appropriate “doable” career path. This slide is a student’s understanding of an area they consider a loose end that could stall their ultimate desire for a particular career. It utilizes a 3 part scenario of potential outcomes that are basically a best, worst and in between scenario, the odds of a particular outcome happening, and what the student considers the consequence of that outcome on their quality of life.
  • Top: Arrowhead Summit apartments, a 400 unit complex across the street (bottom right picture) from the LDI program building. Students live in a regular, inclusive adult apartment community, rather than being a segregated, high command/control environment such as a group home or therapeutic living situation.Bottom left: Arrowhead Towne Center Mall approx 3 blocks from apartments. Bottom right: View from the LDI program building with the AS apartment complex in the left background.
  • LDI students working with each other and staff learning to prepare 3 course meals from scratch.
  • This is a portion of the LDI Program Competency Matrix. We have identified 22 areas of adult performance and 102 major life demands which the student and LDI staff work towards mastery during the two years a typical student attends the program.
  • This shows a thread an example of how the pieces of instruction relate to each other. The last column of specific life skills that would be potentially assessed through a combination of student documentation, demonstration, or dialog about achieving the competency.
  • LDI has developed an array of checklists, inventories, observations, etc. that group student skill acquisition levels for a given competency. This facilitates building a transcript of meaningful outcomes that are measurable and observable.
  • Parents need to think through what they are ready for and able to handle, when considering independent living options for their adult children with disabilities.
  • It can be hard for parents to let go of their adult children with disabilities, especially when they remember situations such as this photo, where it is so easy for adults with ADHD to not think through some of their choices….lol!
  • Adult-oriented social recreational activities provide LDI students with opportunities to experience life with each other and choose the types of places, events, and fun activities that they want.
  • Young adults choose to attend LDI, and most of them live up to their personal and program commitments. In general, peer pressures at LDI are positive and supportive of each other’s journey to independence.
  • Physical, spiritual, and intellectual activities such as going out of the country or participating in LDI Leadership retreats where they experience how to become leaders of themselves, accept and work through differences in a civil manner, and give back to the community are vital components of improving their overall quality of life- as People, not conditions.
  • At LDI, we believe that PWD/our students should be part of the community, rather than be kept apart from the community.
  • What's the Game Plan? Postsecondary considerations for young adults with disabilities

    1. 1. What’s the Game Plan?Postsecondary considerations for Young adults with disabilities Rob Crawford Life Development Institute March 22, 2012
    2. 2. As a society, we have come a longway with regards to howWe view and treat people livingwith the experience of disabilities
    3. 3. SINFUL &CURSED
    4. 4. SICKNESS
    5. 5. BROKEN
    6. 6. SOCIALMODEL
    7. 7. Higher education andpostsecondary participation rates are increasing Crawford 2010
    8. 8. Crawford 2010
    9. 9. Adult students with disabilities demographics changing Crawford 2010
    10. 10. Crawford 2010
    11. 11. Educational achievement is not apredictor of a well-prepared employee Extensive training in “soft skills” increases cost of doing business Crawford 2010 19
    12. 12. Workplace skill demands raises bar toemployment for people with disabilities These are not embedded skills in the current educational system Crawford 2010 20
    13. 13. The Business Case for Disability EmploymentInclusion “Includes” People with Disabilities! •In the US, one out of 8 people report having a disability. People with Disabilities are the largest minority subgroup in the US and is growing in nations such as Japan who has one of the largest aging populations in the world.Employment Rate DisparityIn developing countries, 80% to 90% of persons with disabilities of working age are unemployed, whereas in industrializedcountries the figure is between 50% and 70%. In the US, 39.5% of working-age people with disabilities are employed vs. 79.9%of those without disabilitiesEducational AttainmentIn the US, 12.3% hold a bachelors degree or more & 29.7% have some college or an associate degree, 34% of working-agepeople with disabilities have a high school diploma or equivalentThe Bottom LineWorkplace Disability continues to grow with aging of the workforce and active war. In the US, 21% of experienced seasonedworkers 45 to 54 years of age have a disability. The often-ignored market segment of people with disabilities is 54 million peoplestrong, with an aggregate income that exceeds $1 trillion and has $220 billion in discretionary spending power.In a consumer survey, consumers prefer to give their business to companieswho employ people with disabilities!Source: 2008 Disability Status Report, Cornell University, DiversityInc. 21
    14. 14. However, it is a minority groupwith unacceptably high levels of unemployment Crawford 2010
    15. 15. Employment Statistics for Youth Out of School > 1 yr (NLTS2 Wave 3, 2005) Condition LD ED OHI Autism Employed 62% 42% 65% 37% Fired in last 19% 30% 19% 21% 2 yr Disclosed 8% 15% 17% 54% condition before hired Disclosed 0% 2% 5% 9% condition Copyright: Crawford 2007 after hired
    16. 16. Source: BLS 2012
    17. 17. Each year, over 200 billion dollarsis spent in entitlements ratherthan on training/employment Crawford 2010
    18. 18. Crawford 2010
    19. 19. Formal assessment lessons/materials
    20. 20. Informational InterviewCompany Custom Cactus Jo Ann Bunger Steel: Suft Aurotek:Name: Removal: Construction Construction: Clean Up:Previous Experience inExperience: moving Saguaros.On the Job If hiring, yes.Training:Testing on No testing onApplication: application.Work Hot in summer.Environment:Salary Range: $8.00 to $12.00 an hour. Employer responsesBenefits Medical only. NoOffered: 401K.Dress Code: Long pants, boots and leather.Shifts Early morning toAvailable: mid-afternoon.Manager Name: Cal (owner)
    21. 21. Uncertainties Getting a JobOutcomes I won’t be able to I’ll get a job but be paid I’ll get a job and keep it, get a job at a vet’s less than a certified vet too. office tech should getChances Least Likely Most likely Somewhat likelyConsequences I may have to I’ll be paid less than I Best outcome, my consider other should get, but at least license will make me a areas of work, at I’ll have a job prime candidate for any least until I get a This is likely because Veterinary practice that job at as a vet tech. even though I’ll have is hiring. Somewhat But chances of this the certification, I won’t likely because of course, are low because have the experience. there’s no guarantee I’ll there is a high be able to keep the job. demand for certified vet techs in the field.
    22. 22. SUB DOMAIN/COMPETENCY SUB-COMPETENCY/MAJOR LIFE DEMAND1. Selecting and Managing a Household 1 Maintain home exterior/interior 2 Use basic appliances and tools 3 Select adequate housing 4 Set up household 5 Maintain home grounds2. Buying, Preparing and Consuming Food 6 Purchase food 7 Clean food preparation areas 8 Store food 9 Prepare meals 10 Demonstrate appropriate eating habits 11 Plan/eat balanced meals3. Buying and Caring for Clothing 12 Wash/clean clothing 13 Purchasing clothing 14 Iron, mend and store clothing4. Utilizing Recreational Facilities and 15 Demonstrate knowledge of availableEngaging in Leisure community resources 16 Choose and plan activities 17 Demonstrate knowledge of the value of recreation 18 Engage in group and individual activities
    23. 23. Informal checklists with performance standards
    24. 24. Life Development Institutewww.lifedevelopmentinstitute.org(623)773-2774

    ×