Copyright Law in the Classroom
What is Copyright? <ul><li>Article 1, section 8 of the US Constitution grants Congress the authority to… </li></ul><ul><li...
What can be Copyrighted? <ul><li>Copying text from books or periodicals, music, video and multimedia. </li></ul>This inclu...
Identifying Copyrighted Materials <ul><li>A creator’s work is automatically protected upon formation but they can identify...
Rights of Copyright Ownership <ul><li>Right to make copies </li></ul><ul><li>Right to create derivations </li></ul><ul><li...
School use of copyrighted materials <ul><li>Schools can acquire a  site license  which allows schools to make copies of co...
Illegal Copying <ul><li>This practice is also known as  software piracy . </li></ul><ul><li>Fact: Every year, software aut...
Fair Use Policy <ul><li>When using others’ work for instruction, one must consider the following: </li></ul><ul><li>What i...
Use of Video Programming <ul><li>Guidelines for use of recorded video programs: </li></ul><ul><li>Recorded videos must be ...
Fair Use and the Internet <ul><li>Photocopying regulations: </li></ul><ul><li>Brevity  – the lesser of either 1000 words o...
Establishment of multimedia guidelines <ul><li>CONFU – Conference on Fair Use </li></ul><ul><li>TEACH – Technology, Educat...
TEACH Act <ul><li>Due to the limitations that copyright law places on educators, distance learning has a great challenge. ...
Use of Student Work <ul><li>Publishing work online </li></ul><ul><li>Copying exemplary work for use in future classes </li...
So Many Limitations <ul><li>Despite the limitations, one must remember the purpose of copyrighting is the following: </li>...
Information used for this slideshow is derived from the following: <ul><li>Grabe, Mark and Cindy Grabe. Integrating Techno...
Submitted by,  L. Darin, EDT 514 January 14, 2008
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Copyright in the classroom

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Use of copyrighted materials in the classroom

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Copyright in the classroom

  1. 1. Copyright Law in the Classroom
  2. 2. What is Copyright? <ul><li>Article 1, section 8 of the US Constitution grants Congress the authority to… </li></ul><ul><li>“ promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries.” </li></ul>
  3. 3. What can be Copyrighted? <ul><li>Copying text from books or periodicals, music, video and multimedia. </li></ul>This includes software, pictures, works of art and Internet WebPages.
  4. 4. Identifying Copyrighted Materials <ul><li>A creator’s work is automatically protected upon formation but they can identify the copyright using the following format: </li></ul><ul><li>© 2008 Lisa Darin or Copyright 2008 Lisa Darin </li></ul><ul><li>The lack of these identifications of copyright does not necessarily indicate a lack of copyright. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Rights of Copyright Ownership <ul><li>Right to make copies </li></ul><ul><li>Right to create derivations </li></ul><ul><li>Right to sell or distribute copies </li></ul><ul><li>Right to perform or display a work in public </li></ul>
  6. 6. School use of copyrighted materials <ul><li>Schools can acquire a site license which allows schools to make copies of copyrighted software. </li></ul><ul><li>There are two types of site licenses: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Copies are limited to a certain number </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Copies are unlimited but must be used on a school owned machine. </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Illegal Copying <ul><li>This practice is also known as software piracy . </li></ul><ul><li>Fact: Every year, software authors lose $2.6 billion in U.S. sales. </li></ul><ul><li>Blatant copying of software is illegal, as is running software on a LAN and allowing multiple users to access the software without a site license. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Fair Use Policy <ul><li>When using others’ work for instruction, one must consider the following: </li></ul><ul><li>What is the purpose of its use? (for profit vs. non-profit) </li></ul><ul><li>What is the nature of the copyrighted work? (fact vs. fiction) </li></ul><ul><li>What is the amount and substantiality of the portion used? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the impact on its commercial value? (ex. Copying workbooks that could be purchased) </li></ul>
  9. 9. Use of Video Programming <ul><li>Guidelines for use of recorded video programs: </li></ul><ul><li>Recorded videos must be used within the first ten school days of the forty-five calendar days following the actual broadcast. Then they must be erased. </li></ul><ul><li>Recordings can only be made by a school upon teacher request. The program may only be recorded once regardless of the number of times it is aired. </li></ul><ul><li>Program content may not be altered. The copy must contain the broadcast copyright notice. </li></ul><ul><li>Schools must be responsible for their teachers’ adherence to copyright law. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Fair Use and the Internet <ul><li>Photocopying regulations: </li></ul><ul><li>Brevity – the lesser of either 1000 words or 10% </li></ul><ul><li>Spontaneity – lack of time to obtain permission </li></ul><ul><li>Cumulative effect – limiting the time of use </li></ul>Guidelines do not presently exist. However, to be safe refer to photocopying regulations.
  11. 11. Establishment of multimedia guidelines <ul><li>CONFU – Conference on Fair Use </li></ul><ul><li>TEACH – Technology, Education, and Copyright Harmonization Act of 2002 </li></ul>
  12. 12. TEACH Act <ul><li>Due to the limitations that copyright law places on educators, distance learning has a great challenge. The TEACH Act has lifted some of the limitations in order to ease accessibility. </li></ul><ul><li>Resources are only accessible to enrolled students through, for example, password protected websites. (responsibility of the institution) </li></ul><ul><li>Copyrighted materials may be used according to set guidelines during a reasonable time period for the class instruction. (responsibility of the educator) </li></ul>
  13. 13. Use of Student Work <ul><li>Publishing work online </li></ul><ul><li>Copying exemplary work for use in future classes </li></ul><ul><li>Publishing work in a book (This is derivation.) </li></ul>Obtain written student and parental permission.
  14. 14. So Many Limitations <ul><li>Despite the limitations, one must remember the purpose of copyrighting is the following: </li></ul>“ to promote the progress of science and useful arts.”
  15. 15. Information used for this slideshow is derived from the following: <ul><li>Grabe, Mark and Cindy Grabe. Integrating Technology for Meaningful Learning; 5 th ed. 2007 Houghton Mifflin Company. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Submitted by, L. Darin, EDT 514 January 14, 2008
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