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Assignment 5
Assignment 5
Assignment 5
Assignment 5
Assignment 5
Assignment 5
Assignment 5
Assignment 5
Assignment 5
Assignment 5
Assignment 5
Assignment 5
Assignment 5
Assignment 5
Assignment 5
Assignment 5
Assignment 5
Assignment 5
Assignment 5
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Assignment 5

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  • 1. Assignment 5: Research of potential topics Laura Cuk
  • 2. Chosen topic – Stop drug use In the UK today, approximately 10 billion people smoke. Now this can be because 1. they want to look cool 2. to possibly have a release from stress 3. or maybe because smoking is just too addictive they cant stop. To become addicted to smoking it takes a minimum of 5 years. Approximately 4.9million people worldwide die each year as a result of smoking. Smoking
  • 3. Smoking history in the UK Tobacco was firstly introduced to Europe in the 16th century as tobacco was originally used as a form of medicine. The pipe as shown in the image on the right was brought in by Ralph Lane. The tobacco pipe then became popular around the time of WW1. During this period the tobacco pipe was portrayed as a luxurious product for many men.
  • 4. What makes it so addictive? Nicotine is the main substance of a cigarette. This makes it so highly addictive. Within 7 seconds the nicotine enters the brain and provides the sensation of relaxation, alertness and puts you into a better mood. This type of boost makes the craving more intense and increases the smoking intake. However, once nicotine is out of your systems there are withdrawal symptoms, such as: • Anger • Frustration • Anxiousness • Restlessness • Change in mood • Change in heart rate • Change in digestion • Sleeping problems
  • 5. What are the risks?
  • 6. Affects don’t stop on you… The affects of smoking don’t stop on the individual that smokes, this affects everyone them too… Smoking can affect your family and your friends. Example; If you have people living in your home were you smoke the people around can easily pick up second hand smoking If your family or friends pick up second hand smoking this can lead to lung cancer from inhaling all that smoke. Also, if pregnant women are near second hand smoking this can lead to their unborn baby having the risk of being underweight.
  • 7. Stop Smoking Start Repairing!! Once smoking is ‘out of your system’, there are great health benefits… Time period Health benefits 24 hours Risk of heart attack decreases 48 hours Ability to taste and smell improves 72 hours Breathing gets easier as bronchial tubes relax, lung capacity increases 3 weeks Mucus in the lungs loosens, lung function and circulation improves 2 months Blood flows more easily to arms and legs 3months Lungs become more healthy, breathe more easily, fewer colds 1 year Risk of sudden death from heart attack is cut in half 5 years Lung cancer death rate decreases by 50% 10 years Risk of cancer drops significantly
  • 8. Cigarette Formula Tobacco smoke contains over 4,000 chemicals, more than 50 of which are known to cause cancer.
  • 9. Media portrayal of smoking How does the media prevent people from smoking? In the media there are a lot of advertisements that aim to scare and shock smokers worldwide to connote what smoking does to you and the people around you. These advertisements are also shown on the cigarette packets themselves.
  • 10. Media portrayal of smoking NHS have been doing many advertisements to persuade parents to quit smoking because of its affect on young children. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TYah-yv646Q This advert shows passive smoking surrounding a baby in their home while the mum smokes in the garden doorway – connotes what is invisible to the human eye.
  • 11. Chosen topic – Animal cruelty Animals are used for all sorts of horrible things, such as: • Sporting events • Medicine • Animal testing • Fur used as fashion • Pedigree breeding • Animals as food Animal Cruelty Over 100 million animals are poisoned/abused in the U.S. (what about in other countries?)
  • 12. Animal cruelty history The purposes of animal cruelty is usually for killing animals for food, or for their fur. Also it usually encompasses inflicting harm for personal amusement. Laws concerning animal cruelty are designed to prevent needless cruelty to animals, rather than killing for other aims such as food, or they concern species not eaten as food in the country involved, such as those regarded as pets. In an animal welfare position they hold that there is nothing inherently wrong with using animals for human resources, however these activities should be done in a humane way that minimizes unnecessary pain and suffering.
  • 13. Animal cruelty in the UK In the UK animal cruelty is a criminal offence where you can be jailed for up to 51 weeks and could be fined up to £20,000. But since the RSPCA was introduced from the House of Commons, the maximum punishment is hard labour for 6 months and a fine of £25.
  • 14. Born to suffer Pedigree breeding has a huge impact on the dogs health and welfare. For example: The Pug RSPCA believe that pedigree breeding is a scandal and is very serious. It is believed that dogs such as the Pug have been bred because of their looks. It is also believed by scientists that dogs have been bred too much that they are not able to walk or breathe properly. This dog has small nostrils and abnormally developed windpipes which means they can suffer from severe breathing difficulties and may even having the difficulty to play or walk.
  • 15. Are animal experiments necessary? There is a debate about animal experiments being necessary and morally wrong. Animal experiments are one of the traditional approaches to studying how human and animal bodies work and for testing medicine and chemical products – that is stated from scientists . However RSPCA are debating that the usage of animals and the justification for the suffering caused should be challenged critically with animals lives and welfare given higher priority. Adding to that, there must be an end to animal suffering in the name of science and should use a more humane approach.
  • 16. Cruel sports Example: Bullfighting • Bulls are usually weakened deliberately by being drugged • Their horns get shaved down in order to disorientate them. • Sandbags are then dropped on their backs. • Petroleum jelly is rubbed into their eyes to make their vision blurred • Then the fun part, the bull has no chance against the matador who then kills the bulls slowly with repeated stabbing. Another horrible discovery is using animals such as dogs, horses in races which are drugged and are forced to race. These animals will feel trapped because of the small crates they are put in. Also, once the animals stop winning they are euthanized, or sent to slaughterhouses. No animals should die or be killed for entertainment!!!
  • 17. Your fur had a face! Whether it came from the animal or a fur farm, every fur coat, even a trim caused an animal tremendous suffering. In fur farms, all animals are confined to a cramped space like a wired cage. Fur farmers use the cruellest killing methods you can imagine. They could either suffocate, electrocute, poison or gas these animals. Any animal fur, leather, wool, exotic skins is usually not labelled, so who knows what defenceless creature you are wearing.
  • 18. Animals in danger Elephants are in danger of becoming extinct because they are killed for their ivory tusks which are used to make ornaments and necklaces. Blue whales are in danger of becoming extinct because they are being killed for oil and food. Pandas are in danger of becoming extinct because they are killed because of their soft fur which are made for rugs (pandas are symbols of WWF which is an organisation that tries to help animals and their homes). Rhinoceros’ are in danger because their horns are cut off for medicine, beauty products/cosmetics.
  • 19. The truth in the media The media have brainwashed stories of how awesome their anti-aging cream is and how the latest lip gloss is a must have accessory. Also, how a detergent company want us to used their newly created formula for having cleaner sheets. But what we don’t realise is what is hidden from us. Animals are still in those laboratories today being experimented on.

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