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Argumentative essays
Argumentative essays
Argumentative essays
Argumentative essays
Argumentative essays
Argumentative essays
Argumentative essays
Argumentative essays
Argumentative essays
Argumentative essays
Argumentative essays
Argumentative essays
Argumentative essays
Argumentative essays
Argumentative essays
Argumentative essays
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Argumentative essays

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  • 1. ArgumentativeEssays
  • 2. What is an ArgumentativeEssay?An argumentative essay is an essay in which youagree or disagree with a certain issue, usingreasons to support your opinion.
  • 3. What is an ArgumentativeEssay?You may be asked a question like this:Stem cell research offers a potential cure formany fatal diseases. Many people oppose stemcell research because it involves using cells fromhuman embryos. Do you agree or disagree thatstem cell research should be prohibited?
  • 4. What is an ArgumentativeEssay?Note: What is unique about an argumentativeessay is that you do not just give reasons tosupport your point of view. You must alsodiscuss the other side’s reasons and rebut them.(Rebut means to point out problems with the other side’s reasons to prove they arenot good reasons.)
  • 5. Organization of anArgumentative Essay?There are two common ways to organize anargumentative essay.• the block pattern• the point-by-point pattern
  • 6. Block PatternI. IntroductionExplanation of the issueThesis statementII. BodyBlock 1A. Summary of the other side’s argumentsB. Rebuttal to the first argumentC. Rebuttal to the second argumentD. Rebuttal to the third argumentBlock 2E. Your first argumentF. Your second argumentG. Your third argumentIII. Conclusion - may include a summary of your own point of view
  • 7. Point-by-Point PatternI. IntroductionExplanation of the issue, including a summary of the other side’s argumentsThesis statementII. BodyA. Statement of the other side’s first argument and rebuttal with yourown counter argument.B. Statement of the other side’s second argument and rebuttal withyour own counter argument.C. Statement of the other side’s third argument and rebuttal with yourown counter argument.III. Conclusion - may include a summary of your own point of view
  • 8. The Introductory ParagraphThe introductory paragraph contains anexplanation of the issue, which is a necessarypart of an argumentative essay.You may also begin your argumentative essaywith a more engaging introduction - withsurprising statistics, for example, or adramatic story.
  • 9. The Introductory ParagraphIf you choose to write an attention-gettingintroduction, you may need to explain theissue in a second introductory paragraph andwrite your thesis statement at the end of this(the second) paragraph.
  • 10. The Introductory ParagraphThesis StatementThe thesis statement in an argumentativeessay states clearly which side you are for:Stem cell research should receive the fullsupport of our government.
  • 11. The Introductory ParagraphA thesis statement often mentions theopposing point of view. Notice that thewriter’s opinion is expressed in the main(independent) clause, and the opposing pointof view is normally put in a subordinatestructure.Although there are certainly reasons to becautious with stem cell research or any newtechnology (subordinate clause), its potential benefitsfar outweigh its dangers. (main clause)
  • 12. The Introductory ParagraphUse expressions like the following tointroduce opposing points of view.Some people feel that the United Statesshould change their healthcare plan.Many think that genetically engineeredcrops are a grave danger to theenvironment.
  • 13. The Introductory ParagraphSmokers say that they have the right tosmoke.It may be true that the U.S. constitutiongives citizens the right to own weapons.
  • 14. The Introductory ParagraphThen connect the opposing point of view toyour own with transition signals of contrast.Some people feel that the United Statesshould change their healthcare plan;however, others feel that the governmentshould stay out of the health care business.
  • 15. The Introductory ParagraphAlthough/Even though many think thatgenetically engineered crops are a gravedanger to the environment, such crops canalleviate world hunger and malnutrition.Smokers say that they have the right tosmoke in spite of the fact that/ despitethe fact that smoking will kill them.
  • 16. The Introductory ParagraphWhile/Whereas it may be true that theU.S. constitution gives citizens the right toown weapons, the men that wrote theconstitution lived in a different time.

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