Child Safety
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  • Do not apply ice, iced water, lotions, moisturisers, creams or powders to the burn
  • Plus all your other obvious ones
  • Even children who seem to know all the road safety rules won’t necessarily remember to follow them.
  • Use common sense! Make sure equipment is used correctly in the manner it is intended. At the playground swing on the monkey bars- don’t climb over the top. Slide down the slide on your bottom, not head first. If the playground has a fort/ cubby- no climbing on the roof. No jumping off the equipment. Etc

Transcript

  • 1. In The HomeBURNS & SCALDSHow To Prevent: Supervise children constantly, especially around stoves, ovens, microwaves Turn handles on pots and pans towards the back of the stove when cooking Keep a close eye on children while the BBQ is heating up, being used or cooling down. Some BBQs keep their heat for hours. Hot drinks are the major cause of burns.
  • 2. First Aid for Scalds & Burns Treat the burn with cold tap water only. Cool the burned area under running water for a minimum of 10 mins and no longer than 20 mins. Call an ambulance if the burn is to the face, neck or genitals area or if the burn is larger than the size of the child’s hand. Definitely go to the doctor or to a hospital if the burn or scald is the size of a 20cent piece or larger, the burn looks raw or blistered, or the pain persists or is severe. DO NOT peel off any clothing that is stuck to the burn, and do not break any blisters.
  • 3. HOUSEHOLD POISONSPoisons Information Centre 13 11 26Items which can poison include: Detergents Spray cleaners Cream cleaners Shoe polish Pesticides, herbicides and snail killer Fertilisers Shaving foams Bubble blowing solution CD and DVD cleaner
  • 4. MEDICINES Medicine accounts for 70% of all cases of children being poisoned. Just about all medicines are poisonous if taken in large enough does, including vitamin pills and herbal remedies. If your child needs to take medicine, read the instructions carefully and always supervise your children while taking medicine.
  • 5. Out of the HomePEDESTRIAN SAFETY Up until the age of 10 or so, children need active supervision to help them navigate cars, roads and car parks safely. For younger children teach them about car, road, footpath and car park safety. Always model safe behaviour around cars, roads, footpaths and car parks, for e.g. always cross at pedestrian crossings, use the lights, and look in every direction to check that there are no cars coming. Stop at driveways and check that there are no cars reversing or entering.
  • 6. KIDS ON WHEELSBIKES 85% of all bicycle injuries are a result of the child losing control of the bike and falling off. Getting the right size bike is vital All riders of bikes are required by law to wear a Standards Australia approved helmet. Children under 12- and older riders accompanying them- may ride a bicycle on the footpath unless specifically prohibited by signs.
  • 7. Bicycle Safety Checklist Brakes- ensure brake blocks are not worn down and are fitted correctly. Chain- should be frequently oiled and not be too loose Tyres- look for bald spots, bulges and cuts Pedals- must spin freely Bell or horn- should be loud enough for others to hear Handlebars- ends are covered by hand grips Seat- is adjusted to suit the child’s height
  • 8. Safe Riding Teach children to walk bikes across pedestrian crossings. Teach children to wear enclosed footwear when riding Discourage stunt riding. “Look no hands” etc. Never make a turn without looking behind you Always give way to pedestrians Wear light or bright coloured clothing Obey all road rules and know what each traffic sign means
  • 9. SKATEBOARDS AND ROLLERBLADES The most common injuries are falls, although there have been injuries and deaths associated with running into vehicles and pedestrians Rollerblades need to be a comfortable, firm fit on the child’s feet Skateboards and rollerblades may be used on the footpath regardless of the riders age, unless specifically prohibited by signs. Helmets should be worn along with other safety equipment such as knee pads and elbow pads.
  • 10. Tips for Falling Safely Bend your knees and get down low Try to fall sideways, not backwards or head first Fall onto your pads
  • 11. HELMETS To be effective, the helmet must fit properly. Helmets reduce the risk of brain injury by 40%-90% The helmet should sit straight on the head. Place the palm of your hand under the front of the helmet and push up and back. If the helmet moves easily, it does not fit. Look for the Australian Standards mark. Second hand helmets are risky- theres no way of knowing if the previous owner has damaged it in an accident. There are different helmets for skateboards and bikes. A skate helmet protects the back of the head. Grown ups should also wear helmets to set the right example and protect their own heads.
  • 12. SCOOTERS Scooters are most commonly associated with fall injuries with two thirds of those injured under 14 years Scooters may be ridden on the footpath by children under 12, unless specifically prohibited by a sign. Check that the scooter haso Good brakes and lockso No sharp edgeso A steering column that locks easilyo Handlebar grips that do not swivelo A running board high of the groundo Anti-skid footpads
  • 13. Tips for Preventing Accidents: Keep a close watch on older children swinging from the monkey bars and the flying fox. Look for a safe ground surface in your playground- where equipment is set in a thick layer of certified organic mulch or soft rubber flooring (about 300mm deep) Try to convince children not to do any of the following:o Climbing on top of the monkey barso Jumping from the top of the slide/climbing frameo Standing on swingso Going head first down slides, tubes or poleso Sitting on or climbing over guardrails and barrierso Running down slides
  • 14. PLAYGROUNDS Although reasonably common, most injuries in the playground are not very serious, and fatal accidents are rare. The most common injuries at the playground are fractures and dislocations resulting from falls from equipment (such as climbing frames, monkey bars, slides).
  • 15. Tips for Preventing Accidents: Keep a close watch on older children swinging from the monkey bars and the flying fox. Try to convince children not to do any of the following:o Climbing on top of the monkey barso Jumping from the top of the slide/climbing frameo Standing on swingso Going head first down slides, tubes or poleso Sitting on or climbing over guardrails and barrierso Running down slides
  • 16. Swimming Prior to involving your child in water activities, please find out if they can swim. Even when children can swim, 100% supervision is the key to prevent drowning. Only take your friend to patrolled beaches where surf lifesavers are present and only swim between the flags. Teach your friend what to do if she needs help: stay calm, float and raise an arm to signal to a lifeguard or lifesaver. Dont run and dive in the water. Check it’s okay to swim before you enter the water, conditions change regularly. Be Sun Smart use at least 15+ sunscreen, wear a long- sleeve shirt and broad brimmed hat.
  • 17. Activity Guidelines To encourage good sun safety habits it is essential that you role model appropriate behaviours including: wearing a hat, sunglasses, appropriate clothing and applying sunscreen at appropriate intervals. Take water with you whenever you go out, to prevent dehydration. Use common sense.