BCC Universal Design for Learning Presentation

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  • Course curriculum, instruction, assessment and environment. The following are the best practices for each of these UCD components. We suggest you use this list as you work to incorporate UCD into your course.
  • There is an image of a student in her professors office yelling “an f? I did everything you told me to!!!”
  • There is an image of a student in her professors office yelling “an f? I did everything you told me to!!!”
  • Course curriculum, instruction, assessment and environment. The following are the best practices for each of these UCD components. We suggest you use this list as you work to incorporate UCD into your course.
  • Learning style survey at the beginning of class, adjust your instructional plan based on the results
  • “Writing to learn” helps students make sense of what a course teaches.
  • Many of the active learning strategies that are covered elsewhere in this tutorial can also double as classroom assessment techniques. Brainstorming is one such example, as is another technique closely related to it: focused listing. Focused listing measures what students do and don't know about a subject, as well as the network of ideas related to it. This technique is very adaptable. It lends itself well to multiple disciplines and can be used at the beginning, middle, or end of a class session. When to use focused listing depends on the kind of feedback the instructor wants. For instance, individuals who wish to assesses students' prior knowledge of important terms, concepts, or ideas would administer the technique at the beginning of class or as an introduction to new content. The data, then, might suggest a starting point for the lecture or a focus for it. Using focused listing in the middle of a lesson might provide feedback that the instructor can use during the lesson itself, while focused listing at the end of a class might measure how well students have grasped the material and the effectiveness of the instructor's teaching methods. Focused listing is easy to implement via PowerPoint. Simply create a slide with a focal concept and brief instructions, setting aside a minute or so for students to construct their lists. Some instructors ask students question about the content of their lists as a way getting immediate feedback, while others collect the lists and review them after class.
  • The two minute paper is most appropriate for use at the end of a class session, where it measures how well students have learned material up to that point. It works well in classes of all sizes and is extremely easy to implement, making it a good classroom assessment technique for large lecture sections. There are many variations on this technique. Some instructors ask students to summarize the day's lecture, others ask them to state the most important thing they learned during the session, while others ask students to state questions that they have. In each case, the instructor is provided valuable information that can help determine what students have learned and how best to proceed in subsequent meetings. To implement the technique, instructors should plan at least two or three minutes for the exercise. Prepare a PowerPoint slide with the instructions and the question students should address. Have them write on a sheet of paper or on a 3" x 5" note card, and collect students' responses as they leave the room.
  • There is an image of a student in her professors office yelling “an f? I did everything you told me to!!!”
  • There is an image of an eye next to the heading of visual learners. On the right side of the slide, there is an image of a concept map with the words stating “a diagram may be all a visual learner needs when trying to understand a complex concept. For other students it may not be helpful to receive a diagram without another form of instruction.”
  • Image of a speaker next to the word Auditory Learners. On the right side of the slide, there is an image of instructor holding a glass beaker with a bubble quote stating “Next, pour the solution into the glass beaker.”
  • Image of a hand next to the heading kinesthetic Learners. On the right side of the slide, there is an image of a nursing student holding a needle to draw blood from a patient lying in the bed. The student and the patient both appear nervous.
  • Image of Molly Boyle on the top left. Image of Lori Cooney on the bottom left.
  • BCC Universal Design for Learning Presentation

    1. 1. UNIVERSAL DESIGN Lori Cooney, M.Ed. Project Coordinator & Universal Design Specialist Institute for Community Inclusion University of Massachusetts Boston
    2. 2. UCD COMPONENTS
    3. 3. AGENDA
    4. 4. COURSE CURRICULUM <ul><li>Multimedia materials (videos, podcasts, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Printed or electronic textbooks </li></ul><ul><li>Post course materials online </li></ul><ul><li>Create Universally Designed syllabi </li></ul><ul><li>Put college resources on syllabus (disability, tutoring, counseling, etc.) </li></ul>
    5. 5. Example: Traditional Syllabus
    6. 6. Example: Universally Designed Syllabus
    7. 7. Universally Designed Syllabus Strategies <ul><li>Highlight due dates on a calendar graphic </li></ul>
    8. 8. Universally Designed Syllabus Strategies <ul><li>Create a simple map connecting concepts </li></ul>
    9. 9. Universally Designed Syllabus Strategies <ul><li>Provide a map of your office </li></ul><ul><li>Give directions from the classroom to your office </li></ul>
    10. 11. Active Learning
    11. 12. INSTRUCTION <ul><li>Learning style survey </li></ul><ul><li>Frame each class with an essential question </li></ul><ul><li>Diversify your instruction every 20 minutes </li></ul><ul><li>Use multimedia </li></ul><ul><li>Create universally designed presentations </li></ul>
    12. 13. Writing TO LEARN Exercises BY: PROFESSOR ERIKA LINDEMANN, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA <ul><ul><li>Have students write a paragraph that: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Defines a concept you’re teaching </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Applies a principle to the students’ experience </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Synthesizes or analyzes material </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Summarizes a lecture or reading </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Translates a scientific or mathematical formula into a word problem </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Responds to a painting, piece of music, or campus cultural even t </li></ul></ul></ul>
    13. 14. Activity and ASSESSMENT Strategies <ul><li>Encourage students to choose their medium (e.g. video, speech, paper) </li></ul><ul><li>Offer extra exam time to all students </li></ul><ul><li>E-portfolios </li></ul><ul><li>Rubrics </li></ul>
    14. 15. Active Learning STRATEGY: Focused Listing
    15. 16. Active Learning STRATEGY: Two Minute Paper
    16. 17. Active Learning STRATEGY: Muddiest Point
    17. 18. Integrated Assessment <ul><li>Judy Westerburg and Jack Whiting describe a project combining a general mathematics class (i.e. non-matriculation) and a science class. </li></ul><ul><li>Part 1:Students are divided into groups to compare different brands of popcorn in terms of ratio of popped and unpopped kernels, weight and volume, size, color, flavor, and texture. Then, the class compiles the information for averaging. </li></ul><ul><li>Part 2: Each student creates a magazine advertisement based on the brand they think is best. The advertisement must include a narrative giving at least four reasons (from the data) that their brand is the best. </li></ul>(Westerburg 9 and Whiting 306-08)
    18. 19. Example: Traditional Method of Assessment <ul><li>Write a 3-5 page paper </li></ul><ul><li>Use Times New Roman 12 point font </li></ul><ul><li>Double Spaced </li></ul><ul><li>MLA Bibliography </li></ul>
    19. 20. Assessment Tool
    20. 21. Example: UDL Assessment using a Rubric
    21. 22. Case Study <ul><li>Introduction to Language class is a developmental writing course that has a writing lab component to the weekly lectures. The writing lab meets in a computer lab for 2.5 hours on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Instructor Smith is concerned because many students are not completing their essays for the due dates and they also seem to get distracted from the tasks when in the computer lab. In order to move into the next level writing course, students must complete a portfolio assessment at the end of the semester with 3 completed 5-7 page essays. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Yin – has a difficult time understanding social cues, especially from peers </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Greg – documented disability of attention deficit disorder, accommodation for extended time on assignments </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Sara – visual learner who struggles with articulating her thoughts in text </li></ul></ul></ul>
    22. 23. Group Activity
    23. 24. Design Strategies for the Whole Campus <ul><li>Verify that students can hear and see your presentations </li></ul><ul><li>Put course materials online (e.g. Blackboard) </li></ul><ul><li>Promote and support cultural diversity </li></ul><ul><li>Use technology to enhance the learning experience of all students </li></ul>
    24. 26. Instructional Technology Tools for All Learning Styles
    25. 27. Instructional Technology to meet all Learning Styles
    26. 28. Visual Learners <ul><li>Pictures, charts, maps, graphs, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide handouts </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrations </li></ul><ul><li>Concept map </li></ul><ul><li>Multi-media (e.g. computers, videos) </li></ul>
    27. 29. Auditory Learners <ul><li>Speeches and presentations </li></ul><ul><li>Create podcasts </li></ul><ul><li>Read text out aloud </li></ul><ul><li>Use audiobooks </li></ul><ul><li>Storytelling </li></ul>
    28. 30. Kinesthetic Learners <ul><li>Role play </li></ul><ul><li>Virtual tours </li></ul><ul><li>Group projects </li></ul><ul><li>Highlight reading material </li></ul><ul><li>Create flashcards </li></ul><ul><li>Gaming & simulations </li></ul>
    29. 31. Resources <ul><li>http://www.eeonline.org </li></ul><ul><li>http://ucd.eeonline.org </li></ul><ul><li>http ://www.ldpride.net/ learning_style_work.html </li></ul>Equity and Excellence Project UCD Tool on EEonline Learning Styles Survey
    30. 32. Writing Across the Curriculum by: Julie Bertch <ul><li>3 Basic Premises </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When learning involves writing, more learning is achieved </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning to write involves learning to manage and coordinate the component skills of writing within real writing tasks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Through writing, students can learn how to actively touch the content of a class </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Faculty Involvement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Developed through workshops to help the design of writing assignments. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Workshop sessions may focus on topics such as note-taking, class logs, study guides, writing assignments, essay tests, and conference evaluations </li></ul></ul>(Westerburg 9 and Whiting 306-08)
    31. 33. Contact Information Lori Cooney Project Coordinator and Instructional Design Specialist Institute for Community Inclusion University of Massachusetts Boston [email_address]
    32. 34. Resources <ul><li>Project-Based Learning Planning Forms - http://pbl-online.org/ProjectPlanning/PlanningForm.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://wps.ablongman.com/long_longman_mllcms_1/26/6839/1750844.cw/index.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www1.umn.edu/ohr/teachlearn/tutorials/powerpoint/assessment/index.html </li></ul><ul><li>Learning Styles: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.vark-learn.com/english/page.asp?p=questionnaire </li></ul><ul><li>https://nipissingu.com/faculty/univ1011/Modules/05_YouLearn/05_YouLearn.htm#Scoring </li></ul>

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