New Parent Introduction

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Troop 172 Parent Introduction

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  • In 1888, Baden-Powell wrote, "The formation of the boys into Patrols of from six to eight and training them as separate units each under its own responsible leader is the key to a good Troop.“ Patrols are the building blocks of the Troop Small group to work together in order to be successful Group environment to learn leadership and individual skill
  • Initially led by Troop Guides, Instructors and New Asst Scoutmasters – 6mths Integrated into Troop but expected to grow Patrol relationships Patrol Leadership to be voted for in August How does it work?
  • Boy Scout Advancement is very different from Cub Scouts. In Cub Scouts, adults lead and guide Scouts to learn, achieve and advance. In Boy Scouts, it is up to the Scouts to take the initiative for their own achievements. A lot of it will be familiar, since it is, after all, still Scouting. But, please, ask questions before making assumptions based on your experience with Cub Scouts because Boy Scouts is DIFFERENT. When we start taking about Scouting, I think it is imperative that we keep foremost in our minds – Boy Scouting uses 8 methods to meet their aims. Advancement is only one of eight of these methods – but is the method that often receives the most attention because rank advancement is a very visible part of Scouting.
  • We all agree the aims of Scouting are worthwhile aims, and that is why we are here supporting our sons’ and other boys’ decision to join Boy Scouts. So, how are we going to achieve these aims? Often a Scout will announce his goal for Scouting is to “earn Eagle!”, but achieving a rank is just one goal for a Scout, there much more to Scouting than making a certain rank. Only 3-4% of all boys who join Boy Scouts attain Eagle rank. Every Scout will be given the opportunity to fulfill Eagle rank requirements. And every Scout that participates in the program, whether they earn Eagle or not, will benefit from the methods of Scouting. The aim of Scouting is not to make every boy an Eagle Scout – the aims are: Growth in moral strength and character Participating in Citizenship Development in physical, mental and emotional fitness And rank advancements are only ONE way Scouting helps boys reach these aims.
  • Ideals: Oath – Law – Motto – Slogan Patrols: Peer Groups – Elected Representation – Activities Outdoors: Appreciation and proper procedures Adult Association: Image – Role Models – Examples Personal Growth: Good Turn – Service Projects- Religious Emblems Leadership Development: Leadership skills and practice – Citizenship Uniform: Commitment to Aims – Identity Advancement: Self-reliance – Ability to help others – Challenge
  • In Boy Scouting, the troop, NOT the family, provides regular opportunities for the boys to work on their rank advancement, both by participating in meetings and through attendance at the monthly outings and summer camp. In Boy Scouts the boys are responsible for working on their own advancements. Boys are organized in Patrols based on age, but within that patrol each Scout may be working on a different rank. Maybe the most important difference for you to remember is Scouts must confer with one of the Troop leaders (not mom or dad) to be tested for requirements achievement, and have requirements signed off in their Boy Scout Handbooks. Moms & Dads can be Assistant Scoutmasters once they have completed the necessary training, but part of that training will guide you how to help your Scout and OTHER Scouts complete rank advancements properly. So, in Boy Scouts, the Troop Scoutmaster determines who is eligible to sign off rank advancements, so until the Scoutmaster specifically tells you, “you can sign off requirements in a Boy Scout Handbook”, please don’t.
  • The first rank, “Scout” is, of course, the easiest. Your Scout has already or is in the process of registering with Troop 172. His registration is not completed until ALL forms are complete and turned in. Once registration is done he can ask to meet with an Assistant Scoutmaster to go over the requirements for Scout rank. After the boy shows proficiency, the Scoutmaster signs his Boy Scout Handbook that he has fulfilled all of these requirements. He then will bring his Boy Scout Handbook to the Advancement Coordinator (me). I will arrange to record his rank in TroopMaster, the official troop database, and he will receive his badge at the next regular Troop meeting.
  • The first three ranks (Tenderfoot, Second Class, First Class) are largely based on the learning and application of basic Scout skills (e.g. knots, lashings, first aid, camping) The last three ranks (Star, Life and Eagle) are based on leadership, service and merit badges. Most rank requirements can be worked on simultaneously, but ranks can only be earned in order. If there is any question about the requirements for rank advancements you can always refer to the Boy Scout Handbook. Per BSA policy, no one may add, delete or change any rank requirements. This means no one, not the Scoutmaster, Advancement Coordinator, mom, dad, the District or the Council.
  • Rank Advancement Records are VITAL to your Scout’s rank progress. Without proper records it DIDN’T happen! This means without proper records, the Scout may (and often does) complete the requirement twice (and sometimes more). It is your Scout’s responsibility to keep records of his rank advancement progress. Your Scout will be reminded to bring his Boy Scout Handbook to most Scouting Activities. It is recommended he get a cover for his book, covers are the first to go. It is recommended he take his book to campouts in a sealable plastic bag. If he doesn’t have his handbook, it’s difficult to get requirements signed off in it! Your Scout will be encouraged to make copies of the rank advancement pages in his handbook and KEEP them in a safe place. I recommend making copies AND scanning them into a family computer, if possible. The troop uses a database called TroopMaster to maintain membership, rank and merit badge information. TroopMaster can only provide the information it has been given – garbage in/garbage out. If a Scout is interested in keeping his records up to date in TroopMaster, it is his responsibility to provide information to the TroopMaster Coordinator. TroopMaster can serve as a ‘backup’ to the Scouts records, but in the end, it is not “TroopMaster Scouts” – it is “Boy Scouts” and the responsibility for being a Boy Scout lies with the BOY.
  • Decide what merit badge you would like to earn. Go online to the Troop Site and find a Merit Badge Counselor under the ADVANCEMENT Menu. If you cannot find a counselor, please contact the Merit Badge Counselor Coordinator who will help you find a Merit Badge Counselors that are approved by the Troop, are available and are interested in counseling the specific merit badge. **** MERIT BADGE COUNSELOR COORDINATOR: Ms Talbot - rosie@rosietalbot.com **** Contact the Merit Badge Counselor to make sure they are able to counsel you in earning your Merit Badge and then obtain a Merit Badge Progress Card - BLUE CARD - from a Scoutmaster, Merit Badge Counselor Coordinator or Advancement Coordinator. Talk to your Scoutmaster of your intent to earn the merit badge and obtain the Scoutmaster's Signature on the BLUE CARD to begin your merit badge learning.
  • Meet with your Merit Badge Counselor to learn, explain, and demonstrate all the necessary requirements. Please remember to use the buddy system or have your parents there when meeting with a Counselor (Two-Deep Leadership applies). You will need to meet as many times as necessary to complete the merit badge. Only your merit badge counselor can sign off on your completion of the merit badge requirements. Once you have completed all the requirements for the merit badge, you need to obtain the Merit Badge Counselor's signature on the BLUE CARD. The Merit Badge Counselor keeps a section of the BLUE CARD. You need to get another Scoutmaster signature for the completion and award of the merit badge. Finally, you can turn in your BLUE CARD to the Advancement Chair. You keep one section of the BLUE CARD and the last piece is kept by the Advancement Chair. **** ADVANCEMENT COORDINATOR: Ms Freeman - arlenefreeman@austin.rr.com ****
  • Any Scout can complete a merit badge until age 18, regardless of when the badge was started. To complete a partially earned merit badge from camp, Merit Badge University, or other reasons, if the original counselor is no longer available, you must find a new counselor. Make the Merit Badge coordinator aware of the new counselor. That counselor will review the requirements already accomplished and continue from there. Once you have a new merit badge counselor, only he or she can sign off on your requirements to complete your blue card.
  • Having a merit badge book is very helpful but not required. If you would like to use a book, you can contact the troop’s Librarian to see if the troop has a copy you can borrow, or you can purchase one from the scout store. You can also find requirements and worksheets online at: http://meritbadge.org/wiki/index.php/Merit_Badge_Worksheets .
  • Why does our troop do the things that it does?
  • We are a troop that follows the traditional methods of Scouting as prescribed in the Scoutmaster’s Handbook, Boy Scout Handbook, Unit Advancement Guide and other official BSA resources. This is directed by our charter organization and we are not free to change that.
  • The committee interprets & advises the troop on policies relating to Boy Scouting and the chartered organization. Chair…organizes the committee to see that all functions are delegated, coordinated, and completed. Secretary…takes and reports minutes of the committee meetings. Treasurer…handles all troop funds. All purchases are authorized by the troop committee. Outdoor Chair…works with all of the other people responsible for the outdoor program and is responsible for pulling it altogether and reporting to the committee that things are good to go. The committee gives its blessings, if you will, on all events and calendar items to make sure that everything is pulled together and organized. Advancement Chair…all things advancement go through this person working with her coordinators to make sure that it is coordinated and completed properly. Membership Chair…serves to make sure that all membership records are complete and up-to-date.
  • Questions and Answers
  • New Parent Introduction

    1. 1. Parent Introduction Meeting
    2. 2. The Patrol Method Cesar Gonzalez Scoutmaster
    3. 3. The Patrol Method <ul><li>&quot;The formation of the boys into Patrols of from six to eight and training them as separate units each under its own responsible leader is the key to a good Troop.“ ~ Lord Robert Baden-Powell </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Building blocks of the Troop </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Small group to work together </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Leadership and Skills </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. How Patrols Work for New Scouts <ul><ul><li>How does it work? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>New Scouts are led by Troop Guides, Instructors and New Asst Scoutmasters </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Integrated into Troop to grow Patrol relationships </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Patrol Leadership to be voted for in August </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. Organization Quartermaster Historian Librarian Scribe Chaplains Aide Instructors (3) Troop Guides (3) OA Rep Bugler Den Chief (2) SPL TROOP STAFF ASPLY ASPLO ASPLE ASPLS SPARTANS FLAMING ICE CUBES SURFIN BIRDS PANTHERS COURT OF HONOR CAMPFIRE PROGRAM A-TEAM NEW SCOUTS
    6. 6. Advancement Arlene Freeman Advancement Chair
    7. 7. Aims of Scouting <ul><li>The aim of Scouting is not to make every boy an Eagle Scout; the aims are: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Growth in moral strength and character </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Participate in Citizenship </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop physical, mental and emotional fitness </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. The Eight Boy Scouting Methods <ul><ul><li>Ideals: Oath – Law – Motto – Slogan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Patrols: Peer Groups – Elected Representation – Activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Outdoors: Appreciation and proper procedures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Adult Association: Image – Role Models – Examples </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Personal Growth: Good Turn – Service Projects- Religious Emblems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Leadership Development: Leadership skills and practice – Citizenship </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Uniform: Commitment to Aims – Identity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Advancement: Self-reliance – Ability to help others – Challenge </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Four Steps of Rank Advancement <ul><ul><li>Learning: At meetings – At campouts – At other Boy Scout Activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Testing: Scoutmaster signature on rank requirements in the Boy Scout Handbook </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Review: Scoutmaster Conference – Board of Review </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Recognition: Weekly meetings – Quarterly Courts of Honor </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Scout Rank Requirements <ul><ul><li>Register </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Scout sign, salute and handshake </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Square knot </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Describe Scout badge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Complete parent pamphlet exercises </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Scoutmaster Signature in Boy Scout Handbook </li></ul></ul>
    11. 11. Boy Scout Ranks <ul><ul><li>Tenderfoot </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Second Class </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>First Class </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Star </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Life </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Eagle </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. Recordkeeping <ul><ul><li>It is a Boy Scout’s responsibility to keep records of his rank advancement progress. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Boy Scout Handbook </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Backup Copies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>TroopMaster </li></ul></ul>
    13. 13. Advancement Questions <ul><ul><li>Any questions, so far? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Boy Scout Handbook </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Scoutmaster </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Advancement Coordinator </li></ul></ul>
    14. 14. Merit Badges Rosie Talbot Merit Badge Coordinator
    15. 15. The Eight Steps of Merit Badges <ul><li>The eight steps to earning a merit badge can be found on the troop website at www.troop172tx.org , under advancement </li></ul><ul><li>Select a merit badge of interest </li></ul><ul><li>Find a Merit Badge Counselor </li></ul><ul><li>Contact the Merit Badge Counselor – obtain a Merit Badge Progress Card - BLUE CARD </li></ul><ul><li>Obtain the Scoutmaster's Signature on the BLUE CARD </li></ul>
    16. 16. The Eight Steps of Merit Badges <ul><li>Meet with Merit Badge Counselor to learn, explain, and demonstrate all requirements. Only the merit badge counselor can sign off on completion of the merit badge requirements. </li></ul><ul><li>Once all requirements are complete, obtain the Merit Badge Counselor's signature on the BLUE CARD. </li></ul><ul><li>Obtain Scoutmaster signature for the completion of the merit badge. </li></ul><ul><li>Turn in BLUE CARD to the Advancement Chair. </li></ul>
    17. 17. More About Merit Badges <ul><li>Any Scout can complete a merit badge until age 18. </li></ul><ul><li>To complete a partially earned merit badge , if the original counselor is no longer available, contact a new counselor </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Make the Merit Badge coordinator aware of the new counselor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Review with the new counselor requirements already accomplished </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Continue working on the merit badge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Only the new counselor can sign off on requirements to complete your blue card. </li></ul></ul>
    18. 18. Merit Badge Resources <ul><li>Merit Badge books </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Available for purchase at Scout Store </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Borrow from Troop Library </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Merit Badge requirements </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Requirements and worksheets online </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://meritbadge.org/wiki/index.php/Merit_Badge_Worksheets </li></ul></ul>
    19. 19. Camping <ul><li>Skill Instruction </li></ul><ul><li>Safety and Appropriate Training </li></ul><ul><li>Achievement Verification </li></ul><ul><li>Chaplain Service </li></ul><ul><li>Equipment Support </li></ul>
    20. 20. Expectations at a Campout <ul><li>First Year Scouts Buddy-Up in Troop Tents </li></ul><ul><li>Patrol Independent </li></ul><ul><li>Led by Trip SPL and ASPL </li></ul><ul><li>Work Together to get Troop Elements done </li></ul><ul><li>Participate in planned events </li></ul><ul><li>Learn skills and achieve requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Cook for themselves – Full Prep and Clean-up </li></ul><ul><li>Learn from Skill Presented and Troop Youth Leadership </li></ul><ul><li>No Electronics </li></ul><ul><li>No Sodas </li></ul>
    21. 21. Adult Involvement David Smith Committee Chair
    22. 22. Boy Scouts of America and Charter Organization Policies <ul><li>Mission Statement </li></ul><ul><li>AIMS </li></ul><ul><li>Methods </li></ul><ul><li>Official Resources </li></ul><ul><li>What that means for us… </li></ul>
    23. 23. Troop 172 Structure From the Troop Committee Guidebook Pg. 11
    24. 24. Committee Organization and Responsibilities <ul><ul><li>Participation on the Committee is open and encouraged </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Troop’s board of directors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Supports the troop program </li></ul></ul>From the Troop Committee Guidebook Pg. 13
    25. 25. Getting Involved as an Assistant Scoutmaster <ul><li>Introduction Meeting for New Leaders – March 22 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Patrol Assignments – 6 months </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Training for Safety and Position </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Signoff to Tenderfoot – Introduce Merit Badge Procedure </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Support and Introduction to Troop </li></ul><ul><li>Open Positions on ASM Staff </li></ul><ul><li>Youth Protection and Training Requirements </li></ul>
    26. 26. www.troop172tx.org Cesar Gonzalez, Scoutmaster (512) 922-6178 David Smith, Committee Chair (512) 925-6518

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