Generational Differences At Work
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Generational Differences At Work

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This is a presentation to create awareness of the difference PREFERENCES that are often seen by generation

This is a presentation to create awareness of the difference PREFERENCES that are often seen by generation

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  • ABSTRACT: Generational commonalities cut across racial, ethnic, and economic differences…They all share with their generation what was in the air around them --- news events, music, national catastrophes, heroes, and heroic efforts. Depending on when people are/were coming of age, these events of their time have had a significant impact on their belief of the “way things should be.” * What is “right” for one generation is often in conflict with what is “right” for another generation. Learn why and the impact of “age diversity” on the workplace. * Clashpoints from When Generations Collide who they Are. Why They clash. How to Solve the Generational Puzzle at work By Lynne C. Lancaster and David Stillman

Generational Differences At Work Generational Differences At Work Presentation Transcript

  • I’m OK, You’re OK…………… OK ? Lynn Busby [email_address] February, 2009 Title slide (Generational differences and their impact on collaboration and the work environment)
  • Overview:
    • Generational commonalities cut across racial, ethnic, and economic differences…They all share with their generation what was in the air around them --- news events, music, national catastrophes, heroes, and heroic efforts.
    • (“You are where you were when”)
    • Depending on when people are/were coming of age, these events of their time have had a significant impact on their belief of the “way things should be.”* What is “right” for one generation is often in conflict with what is “right” for another generation.
    • Clashpoints from When Generations Collide who they Are. Why They clash. How to Solve the Generational Puzzle at work by Lynne C. Lancaster and David Stillman
    • ** Book title from IBMer, Sara Mouton Reger – about cultural clashes.
    Can two rights make a wrong?**
  • 1940s
  • 1950s
  • 1960s
  • 1970s
  • 1980s
  • 1990s
  • 2000s
  • In the 1950's Dr. Eric Berne began to develop his theories of Transactional Analysis. He said that verbal communication , particularly face to face, is at the centre of human social relationships. Thomas Harris later wrote a book called “I’m OK, You’re OK” to explain the model and popularized the idea simply stated in diagram below Potential Generational Conflict
  • Age Diversity?
    • How does age diversity affect collaboration in the workplace?
    • We still have a few loyal troopers from the Traditionalist Generation (born before 1945),
    • the Boomers have been change agents, but are starting to think of retirement (those born 1946-1964),
    • The Gen Xers are impatient to get on with the show and back to their lives (those born 1965-1980) and
    • The Gen Yers (born 1980+) are bringing all their techno-savvy into our offices.
    • Just as with cultural differences (i.e. Diversity training), and personality type differences (e.g. Myers Briggs) knowing and understanding the differences in generational background can foster better collaboration.
  • When Generations Collide…………..
    • AT THE AMERICAN Library Association (ALA) meeting in Toronto, a telling generational shift was apparent--under the table.
    • The elegant Traditionalist librarian introducing the speakers wore a skirt, heels, and pantyhose.
    • The Baby Boomer speaker wore a pantsuit, sandals, and no stockings.
    • The Generation X librarian who participated in the panel discussion wore a short skirt and (horrors) flip-flops!
    • Extract from article The Click and Clash of Generations By Lynne C. Lancaster. Boomer Lynne C. Lancaster is cofounder with Gen Xer David Stillman ofBridgeWorks, a consulting firm ( www.generations.com< http://www.generations.com > ). They co wrote When Generations Collide: Who They Are. Why They Clash. How To Solve the Generational Puzzle at Work (HarperBusiness, 2002), which documents the Generations T survey mentioned here
    Kaboom—a generational collision at its finest!
  • Defining Generation types Source: Ron Zemke, Claire Raines, Bob Filipzcak, Generations at Work, Managing the Clash of Veterans, Boomers, Xers,and nexters in Your Workplace, American Management Association, 2000 p.24 with modification to age brackets Note: We must stay away from generalizing and stereotyping and realize that these are just guidelines which may help shed some light on different people's perspectives. Computers Schoolyard violence Oklahoma city bombing It Takes a Village TV talk shows Multiculturalism Girls’ Movement McGwire and Sosa Internet, mobile phones, and instant messaging Watergate, Nixon resigns Latchkey kids Stagflation Single-parent homes MTV AIDS Computers Challenger disaster Fall of Berlin Wall Wall Street frenzy Persian Gulf Glasnost, Perestroika Prosperity Children in the spotlight Television Suburbia Assassinations Vietnam Civil Rights movement Cold War Women’s Liberation The Space Race Patriotism Families The Great Depression WW II New Deal Korean War Golden Age of Radio Silver Screen Rise of labor unions Defining Events and Trends 1980-2000 1960-1980 1943-1960 1922-1943 Approx . Birth Years Gen Yers Gen Xers Baby Boomers Traditionalists
  • The way they see the world… Ron Zemke, Claire Raines, Bob Filipzcak, Generations at Work, Managing the Clash of Veterans, Boomers, Xers,and nexters in Your Workplace , 2000, American Management Association, Page 155 Promiscuity Cliché, hype Political incorrectness Vulgarity Turnoffs Inclusive Reluctant to commit Personal gratification Personal sacrifice Relationships Pulling together Competence Consensus Hierarchy Leadership bycomm1unity Polite Unimpressed Love/hate Respectful View of Authority Determined Balanced Driven Dedicated Work Ethic Hopeful Skeptical Optimistic Practical Outlook 1980-2000 1960-1980 1943-1960 1922-1942 Birth period:>> Yers Xers Boomers Traditionalists  
  • Work Styles Source: n-gen People Performance Inc. www.ngenperformance.com Clashpoints around Careers Traditionalists: Build a legacy Boomers: Build a stellar career Xers: Build a portable career Yers: Build parallel careers
    • Fluid work style
    • Change = Improvement
    • Informal work style
    • Change = potential opportunity
    • Structured work style
    • Change = caution
    • Linear work style
    • Change = Something’s wrong
    Gen Ys Gen Xers Boomers Traditionalist
  • Work Ethics are Impacted by Generational Values
    • Gen Yers in the Workplace
    • Value Authenticity and Autonomy
    • Digital natives
    • Multi-taskers
    • Collectivism is power
    • Fewer gender or ethnicity issues
    • Well educated
    • Xers in the Workplace
    • Value Pragmatism, Being Savvy
    • Independent
    • Entrepreneurial
    • Flexible and adaptable
    • Outcome oriented
    • I’m having a life – right now!
    • Boomers in the Workplace
    • Value Individuality and Tolerance
    • Change agents
    • Drive to compete and excel
    • Relationship oriented
    • Hard work = Badge of Honor
    • Searching their souls
    • Traditionalist s in the Workplace
    • Value Duty, Tradition, and Loyalty
    • Disciplined and committed
    • Civic Minded
    • Willing to reinvent themselves
    • Demand Courtesy
  • Each generation in the workplace comes with its own sets of experiences and expectations that can occasionally come in conflict with one another Source: Lynne C. Lancaster and David Stillman. When Generations Collide: Who They Are. Why They Clash. How To Solve the Generational Puzzle at Work (HarperBusiness, 2002) Part of my daily routine Necessary Sets me back Sets me back Job changing Unfathomable if not provided Unable to work without it Unsure Uncomfortable Technology use On demand Weekly/Daily Once per year No news is good news Feedback Partner Coach Get out of the way Command & control Leadership style Team decided Team included Team informed Seeks approval Decision-making Collaborative Independent Horizontal Hierarchical Problem-solving Collaborative Hub & Spoke Guarded Top down Communications style Collaborative & networked Independent Facilitated Classroom Learning style Continuous and expected Required to keep me Too much and I’ll leave The hard way Training Gen Yers Gen X Boomer Traditionalist
  • Lots of data are being gathered that point to differences in generational preferences
    • &quot;Working--Face Time“ Hudson, the staffing firm, has identified another difference between the generations. Gen Xers and Gen Yers need more hand holding or face time with their bosses than baby boomers or those over age 60.
    • One fourth of Gen Xers and Gen Yers want feedback from the boss at least once a week, compared with one-fifth of boomers and one in ten of those over age 60. Younger workers are also more likely to want a connection to the top brass and to socialize with their managers.
    • (The Washington Post, 26-Oct-2006, p. D2)
    • This report provides Hewitt's summaries of human resources news that appeared in The New York Times , The Wall Street Journal , and The Washington Post . Our intent is to capture the key HR messages, perspective, and tone of each article, without adding any of Hewitt's editorial opinion.
  • A New Generation: Games and Gamers as they relate to business Our research shows that this new generation is very different from the boomers in ways that matter to the business. Beck and Wade
    • They desire systematically different goals in life
    • They have systematically different ways of working
    • How they compete, fit into teams, take risks are all different in statistically verifiable ways
    • They choose systematically different ways to learn
    Sources: Beck and Wade, Got Game, 2005
  • Quotes from blogs of Gen Xers
    • “ Outside of work, my life pretty much consists of sports.   I play ultimate frisbee, tennis, volleyball, ski, snowboard terribly, and have recently started indoor rock climbing.   If I'm going to spend my day at the keyboard, I need to spend my free time keeping my body and soul in shape!”
    “… By Mr. Walker's standards, a job is only as good as the life it provides...&quot; Being a Gen-X'er I can see this common theme among many of my peers.”
  • Comment from an GenYer:
    • “ As a Nexter (born in '79) I thought that a few technological &quot;Events and Trends&quot; were missing. Most notably the internet and mobile phones. We rely a lot on IM and TXT messaging, something that may be perceived as very informal for other generations but a necessity for a generation juggling many distractions. I think this ties in very well with our push for 'collaboration' and 'networking.' I might even goes as far to say that a lot of your points fit in well with the growth of open source software and wikis. Both are technologies that rely on the community for contributions.”
  • Gen Yers – Open to “Ignorance Elimination”
    • “ Ignorance Elimination” is a phrase coined by Bruce Kearney, ex-HPer who says we seek knowledge to eliminate ignorance.
    • Older generations fear showing their ignorance to others
    • Younger generations are open and anxious to close gaps between their knowedge and ignorance.
    • Example:
    • In the Association of KnowledgeWork (AoK) on line Forum, young Singapore students (GenYers) have no fear of asking basic questions of Senior Thought Leaders.
        • (With Boomers……..not so much)
  • Why does all this matter? Innovation is the creative side of collaboration. Collaboration is built on trust. Trust is built on relationships. Relationships are built by getting to know others. Relationships cross generations Knowledge cannot be conscripted; it can only be volunteered David Snowden, Cynefin Centre “ Many ideas grow better when transplanted into another mind than in the one where they sprang up.” Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. (1841-1935), Associate Justice, U.S. Supreme Court
  • Boomers have “deep smarts” and as they retire, knowledge transfer is becoming more important than ever Source: Dorothy Leonard, Harvard Source: Deep Smarts by Dorothy Leonard of Harvard
  •  
  • Source: The New Role of Technology and Services in Next Generation Businesses IGS Worldwide Market Intelligence, Headlights Program, February 25, 2005 - Research & Innovation Team
  • The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave
    • Based on data from surveys of 19,700 employees performed by the Saratoga Institute
    • The Process of Disengagement
    • Reason #1: The Job or Workplace Was Not as Expected
    • Reason #2: The Mismatch Between Job and Person
    • Reason #3: Too Little Coaching and Feedback
    • Reason #4: Too Few Growth and Advancement Opportunities
    • Reason #5: Feeling Devalued And Unrecognized
    • Reason #6: Stress From Overwork and Work-Life Imbalance
    • Reason #7: Loss of Trust and Confidence in Senior Leaders
    Source: The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave: How to Recognize the Subtle Signs and Act Before It's Too Late by  Leigh Branham  Soundview Executive Book Summaries © 2005 http://www.books24x7.com/book/id_11024/toc.asp
  • Email from GenXer who recently left large technology company after 5 years
      • “ I've contemplated staying at here for my entire career, and it was a very tough decision to make.
      • I'm hoping that forcing myself WAY out of my comfort zone, I will be more tolerant to risk and more willing to take more calculated risks in my life. You know the saying...no risk no reward. Well, I'm hoping that will pay off sometime
  • Why does all this matter?
    • The most common intergenerational problems concern managing and motivating others ,
      • it's hard to motivate, coach and give assignments to someone you don't or don't think you understand.
      • Trust is an important commodity in the workplace. Competence and common understandings are important to building and maintaining trust.
    • We don't work well with people we don't trust to do the &quot;right thing,&quot; however we define that. *
    *Source: ”How Veterans, Baby Boomers, Generation Xers and Generation Nexters Can All Get Along in The Workplace”http://www.committment.com/getalong.html
  • What issues do most Boomers have when it comes to relating to their Gen Xer co-workers?
    • Boomers, by and large, talk a more hands-off, participative, collegial management style than they actually practice.
      • They don't mean to be controlling, but they have a vision of how things ought to look and or feel or be that they want to bring about - so they tend to insist things be done a certain way as well.
    • GenXers like to have a spelled-out goal, some resources, and the freedom to decide on how they are going to get things done.
      • They hate Boomer micro-management.
    • Xers don't buy into work, for work's sake. To expect them to make too many sacrifices for the good of &quot;the project&quot; or &quot;the company&quot; too often, will send the average Xer job hunting.
    *Source: ”How Veterans, Baby Boomers, Generation Xers and Generation Nexters Can All Get Along in The Workplace”http://www.committment.com/getalong.html
  • “ Do it for the Gipper*” is lost on Gen Xers and Gen Yers
    • Comment on this presentation from a Nexter:
    • The quote on this page rings very true within our consulting practice. In the past two years, I've seen about one person a month leave for these reasons
    • &quot;Xers don't buy into work, for work's sake. To expect them to make too many sacrifices for the good of &quot;the project&quot; or &quot;the company&quot; too often, will send the average Xer job hunting.&quot;
    *George Gipp of Notre Dame, whose deathbed request to his coach, Knute Rockne, to &quot;Win one for the Gipper&quot; has long been a part of the American lexicon
  • Who do Generation Xers tend to have the most conflict with? In what area and why?
    • Boomers. No question.
      • They believe Boomers are set in their ways. Unwilling to learn new things, and too interested in management fads and fancies. But day-to-day, the biggest conflict is over micro-management.
    • Boomers are alternately worriers and in need of feeling hands-on involved in things.
      • Xers see this as untrusting and intrusive and…….annoying.
    • The Boomer is conflict averse, the Xer is unskilled in conflict management.
      • It's a classic generational clash.
    *Source: ”How Veterans, Baby Boomers, Generation Xers and Generation Nexters Can All Get Along in The Workplace”http://www.committment.com/getalong.html Gen Xer: “Adding fuseball and ping pong is not adding “fun at work” – it just takes away from time spent on personally desired activities – like bowling with my cronnies – it actually caused resentment that boomers were trying to placate Xers”
  • Relationship with Authority Source: n-gen People Performance Inc. www.ngenperformance.com What conflicts do Traditionalists, Boomers, Xers and Yers have about their view of authority and position in the workplace?
    • Respect for authority who demonstrate competence
    • Flip traditional roles by teaching superiors how to use technology
    • Unimpressed by authority
    • Competence and skills are respected over seniority
    • Challenge authority
    • Desire flat organizations that are democratic
    • Respect for authority and hierarchical system
    • Seniority and job titles are respected
    Gen Ys Gen Xers Boomers Traditionalist
  • How about rewards/recognition
    • Traditionalists like memorabilia . Plaques and trophies. Pictures of themselves with important people. Trips to posh retreats are appreciated - even when there is a seminar attendance attached.
    • Boomers like lots of public recognition , status symbols, first class travel upgrades and nice travel bags. The image of the Road Warrior still has appeal. Being asked to explain the organization's winning strategy at an industry trade show is seen as prestigious. A night of fine dining or a trip to a favorite resort or retreat are good rewards. They love see-the-world travel.
    • Xers like better technology . Personal technology, access to the best office tech is high on the list. Adventure holidays, extreme sports holidays - and toys; things to play with and on are appealing. They also appreciate family oriented rewards and time-off as a perk.
    • Gen Yers like open avenues for education and skills building . Organize outings for them - everything from picnics and sporting events to a group theater night. Best &quot;hi-tone&quot; activity is a very fancy, tented dinner outing, followed by an outdoor concert.
    *Source: ”How Veterans, Baby Boomers, Generation Xers and Generation Nexters Can All Get Along in The Workplace” http://www.committment.com/getalong.html
  • Reward Differently *Source: ”How Veterans, Baby Boomers, Generation Xers and Generation Nexters Can All Get Along in The Workplace”http://www.committment.com/getalong.html Reward: Work that has meaning for me. Motivate: Open avenues for education and skill-building. Gen Yers Reward: Freedom is the ultimate reward Motivate: Give them lots of projects. Let them take control of prioritizing and juggling Gen Xers Reward: Money, title, recognition, corner office Motivate: Assist them in gaining name recognition throughout the company. Boomers Reward: The satisfaction of a job well done Motivate: Honor their hard work with plaques and other symbolic records of achievement. Traditionalists
  • Why does all this matter?
    • Today’s business success depends on innovation
    • Innovation is the creative side of collaboration
    • Collaboration is built on trust
    • Trust is built on relationships
    • Relationships cross generations
    • (Lynn Busby)
    I’m OK, You’re OK………