Technology and Education
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A presentation for Husson College that provides an overview of technology practices in education and examples.

A presentation for Husson College that provides an overview of technology practices in education and examples.

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Technology and Education Technology and Education Presentation Transcript

  • Technology and Education: Theory & Practice Laura Blankenship Presentation for Husson College, March 2008
  • Overview • Students, Learning, and the Job Market • Horizon Report • Examples, Low-High Threshold Activities • Topics for Discussion • Time constraints, Change, and other barriers
  • Who are your students?
  • Creators not just consumers • 59% of all teens (12-17) create content online • 28% have a blog • 27% have their own web page • 33% share photos, videos, etc. online • 26% remix content
  • Technology and School • 94% use the Internet to do schoolwork • 44% of 18-29 yo use Wikipedia for information • Only 14% of teens use email to communicate with friends •
  • Need our help Students can use technology for socializing or entertainment, but still have problems finding information, evaluating it and then putting it to use.
  • Learning • Collaboration • Immediate Feedback • Active Learning • Multiple learning styles
  • Jobs of the future • Not employed by single employer • Dislike of hierarchies • Career is plural
  • Gaming and work • Virtually all college students play “video” games • Failure is a norm; learn from failure • Take more risks
  • Distributed work • Telecommuting • Work across time and space • Rewards not based on face time
  • The Horizon Report • Joint project with New Media • 2005 Consortium and Educause • gaming • Attempts to predict trends in technology • ubiquitous wireless • Places within context of education • 2004 • learning objects • knowledge webs
  • Grassroots Video • User-created video • Shared via sites such as YouTube, Blinkx, Blip.tv • Streaming broadcast via Ustream • Broadband access & simple video apps allow proliferation
  • Video: Low Threshold • Find resources Child Development Economics/Marketing Language
  • Video: Medium Threshold •Student assignments •Tools of the trade •Language video •Cameras (Examples) •Video editing software •Economics--video of economics principles •Method of turning in •News broadcasts •Caveats •Skits and plays •Lessons for students
  • Video: High Threshold • Make your own video resources • DVD of clips • YouTube Channel--use for storing resources, recording recaps of class • Create a class video (Michael Wesch) • Resources the same as for student assignments • Biggest barrier--time
  • Collaboration Webs • Using tools to work with others • Share work with others • Converse about projects in real time and across time and space • No need for expensive equipment
  • Collaboration: Low
  • Collaboration: Medium • Combine local resources with Web 2.0 Applications • Google docs • social bookmarking • blogs/wikis • Skype • Facebook • Contribute to existing projects such as Wikipedia
  • Example: Book Project
  • Collaboration: High
  • Enabling Technology • Wiki--editable documents on the web • RSS--Really Simple Syndication, the power behind blogs and other web 2.0 applications (wikis, Flickr, New York Times) • Ajax--fast interaction with web sites • Inexpensive video tools, broadband, voip (voice over ip)
  • Collective Intelligence • Knowledge is created by groups • Wikipedia is best known example • Data is collected, organized, analyzed by dispersed groups
  • Collective Intelligence: Low • Use existing resources • Swivel • Freebase • History Commons • UN datasets
  • Collective Intelligence: Medium • Contribute to existing resources • Upload new datasets • Add graphs or charts • Comment on analyses
  • Collective Intelligence: High • Make your own data resource • Civil Disobedience Wiki • Gulf of Maine Ocean Observations • Mashup your data • Match data with geographic points
  • Time? • Try one thing at a time • Get help • Put your students to work
  • Change • Don’t get too attached • Be open to learning • Seize opportunities
  • Resources • My presentation: • Resources handout • del.icio.us/lblanken/ techlearning
  • Questions?