Celebrating Success And Envisioning Your Dream For The

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Celebrating Success and Envisioning Your Dream for the Future: Mid and Senior Level Women\'s Career Advancement Workshop. This presentation was given at ACUHO-I Annual Conference in Baltimore MD on June 30, 2009. It was presented by Dr. Julie Payne Kirchmeier (University of Southern Illinois Carbondale), Ann Marie Klotz (DePaul University) and Laura A. Berry (University of Southern Indiana). There is a companion workbook that compliments the slide show.

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  • Each of us… will talk about the important to each us?Why is this important for you? What do you want to get out of this?
  • (Laurie)Talk about the workbook ….. And use it as we go throughTHIS IS AN ACTIVE PRESENTATION
  • JPK covers….
  • Why is this topic important?Landscape of Higher Education is still unbalanced by genderIn the 2003-2004 Almanac Issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education, Women comprise 37.21% of the faculty, while men comprise 62.79%According to the 2002 IPEDS data –52.5% of the executive/managerial and administrative positions were held by men, 47.5% by women.At public institutions – these numbers move to 68.4% for men and 31.6% for womenOkay – History’s nice, but what’s impacting advancement today??Social factorsGender bias (Ayman, 1993)Gender role stereotypes and sexist promotional practices (Astin & Leland, 1997; Buttner, 2001; Moore & buttner, 1997; Payne, Fuqua & Canegami, 1997; Swanson, 2000)Lower integration into dominant organizational coalitions (Bass, 1985)
  • Importance of TopicAt the mid-management level for public institutions, 39.7% are men, but 60.3% are women (2002 NCES data)What does this tell us?Women are present in greater numbers at the mid-management level, but at lower numbers for the senior management/administrative levelsPyramid Effect
  • Academic Preparedness:In 2001-2002 – of the 45,000 doctoral degrees awarded, 44% will be to women, and 56% will be to men (2002 NCES data).In the past 18 years – women have earned more than 8100 more doctoral degrees since 1985; men have earned 3381 more since the same date.What does this tell us?The number of women receiving doctoral degrees annually since 1985 has more than doubled the number received by men during the same time period.Women are more academically prepared now than in previous years.
  • Other factors to considerIn 2002 – the median salary for women professionals (Senior Housing Officer level) at public institutions was $48,997.The median salary for male professionals (Senior Housing Officer level) at public institutions was $60,084.What does this tell us?A salary gap still exists for women in mid-management and at senior level positions in higher educationWhat questions are generated from this information?What factors are contributing to the gender gap between the executive and mid-management levels in higher education?What factors are contributing to the gender gap between men and women holding senior level management positions?What factors are contributing to the salary gap between men and women holding senior level management positions?What’s the bigger question we all want answered?WHY?
  • So – let’s think about the historical contextSocialization of womenWomen in the workforceWomen’s access to higher education Environment of business, industry and higher educationWomen’s leadership stylesAffirmative Action policiesOkay – History’s nice, but what’s impacting advancement today??Availability of female mentors and role models in senior level positions (vicious cycle) – (LeBlanc, 1993)Salary inequities – (Gander, 1977)Family responsibilities – (Nobbe & Manning, 1997)Leadership Aspirations – (Boatwright & Egidio, 2003)Networking Issues – (Hall and Sandler, 1984)Lack of advanced degrees (Rosenfeld & Jones, 1987)Restrictions on geographic mobility -(Rosenfeld & Jones, 1987)
  • Okay – History’s nice, but what’s impacting advancement today??Social factorsGender bias (Ayman, 1993)Gender role stereotypes and sexist promotional practices (Astin & Leland, 1997; Buttner, 2001; Moore & buttner, 1997; Payne, Fuqua & Canegami, 1997; Swanson, 2000)Lower integration into dominant organizational coalitions (Bass, 1985)That’s great – but how can we overcome this?Let’s look at the list again:Lack of female mentors/role modelsFamily responsibilitiesLeadership AspirationsNetworking IssuesLack of Advanced DegreesRestrictions on Geographic MobilitySocial RolesCan these be overcome?YES
  • AMKWhy is this important to you and us?
  • AMK
  • AMKEnvisioning ExerciseIf you could have any job in our field what would it be?Envision yourself in that position --- what makes it the ideal job for you?What skills do you need to acquire before you would be strongly considered for that job?How would your life change if you had that job?What are 3 things you can do in the next 6 months to your you closer to your ideal job?
  • Your map is unique to you.The first step to overcoming any internal or external barrier is to identify what they are.Next, you have to actually sit down and take control of your career.NO ONE will do this for you. You must do it on your own, or you will be a victim of circumstance.There are four parts to Career Mapping (from ACE Materials for Presidencies and NAWE – National Association for Women in Education):Pre-phase I – Psychological TransitionPhase I – Introspection and ReflectionPhase II – Networking on your Own behalfPhase III – Interviewing and NegotiatingCareer mapping is a structured process that helps you toArticulate your personal values Articulate your professional ambitionsDevelop strategies to overcome the barriers to advancement that may be present for you – both external and internal - (Tinsley, 1984)
  • LB leadsAudience participation…. Partners here….we will role model…. Career mapping is a structured process that helps you toArticulate your personal values Articulate your professional ambitionsDevelop strategies to overcome the barriers to advancement that may be present for you – both external and internal (Tinsley, 1984)Pre-Phase I – Psychological TransitionDuring this time, you must reflect on what you want for your life – where you currently are and where you want to be. Remember – what is right for you will be right – your ideas and dreams are not wrong.You also need to psychologically prepare yourself for change.Once you decide what you want and need – and that you do want to make a move - then you will move to the active part of the process.ActivityThe Pre-Phase planning you will need to do on your own – this is a very personal experience for you and you alone
  • However, we can begin the Phase I – Introspection/Reflection together
  • Audience interaction ---- share here
  • What type of work environment am I looking for?Institutional TypePublic vs. PrivateComprehensive vs. undergraduateLarge, medium or small student populationTraditional vs. newer university environmentRegion of the country or globe
  • What kind of environment do I want?Professional/Business type of environment?Relaxed, casual environment?How do people treat each other in this environment?What kind of supervision do I want or need?LB’s last slide
  • AMKWhat Career Pathway do I need to follow to get to my long-term goal?Consider all possible career paths – traditional, non-traditionalOutline the career pathWhat skills do I need to develop and possess to achieve my ultimate career goals?What experiences do I need to have to achieve my ultimate career goals?What contributions/outstanding works have I made in my current job?What skills do I already possess?List out your skillsWork with your supervisor or mentor on skills you possess that you may not already haveWhat obstacles will I need to overcome?Skill deficienciesExperiences neededPersonal obstaclesHow can I overcome these obstacles (set a plan for yourself – what will you and can you actively do to overcome these obstacles?
  • Who are your cheerleaders? Who do you turn to for support? We have support networks… who are those who will help you as you progress in your career path?
  • 1. Who do I know that can help me with my career path and help me identify opportunities for advancement? a. Supervisor b. Mentor c. Colleagues d. Professors c. Graduate Internship supervisors2. How can I reconnect or continue to connect with folks that can help me? a. Regional or National conference attendance b. Regional or National committee involvementc. Visits to their institutions/places of business d. E-mails, telephone calls, letters e. Ask for Professional advice
  • JPK here
  • Interviewing:Research the institution and position you are apply to/forInstitution and Organization/DepartmentCurrent happenings on campusInstitutional and Organizational structureBudgetary implications for campusMission, Vision, Goals and Core Values for institution and for unitPositionSalary levelsPosition descriptions/responsibilitiesSupervisor for the positionBenefitsUse your connections and network to find out more about the position and institution/organizationsAnticipate questions for the interviewPlan answers – but don’t memorize themHave questions for your potential employerGet a copy of the interview itinerary ahead of time and the names and positions of those interviewing youSell yourself as much as possible – but don’t overdo itSet up mock interviews for yourself. Videotape them if possible. 
  • Phase III – Interviewing and NegotiatingNegotiatingWhat is it?BargainingGive and TakeThe art of asking for what you want/need but achieving a win-win between employer and employeeNegotiating is where most women fall short of their male colleagues in skill and confidence levelsAccepting vs. AssertingHow do I do this?Be prepared – know the institution and the environmentIf there are open records for salaries for the institution – get them (institutional library)Have options and alternatives (i.e. vacation, moving expenses, professional development funds, etc.)Talk to your mentorShould I negotiate an entry level salary/positionABSOLUTELY – but know the employers financial situation and limitations before you do
  • Laurie takes it
  • Use for contact page…. List names on the bottom… yellow
  • Celebrating Success And Envisioning Your Dream For The

    1. 1. Please turn off cell phones, pagers, and PDAs or set to a silent/vibrate setting. <br />If you must leave the program early, please do so in a manner that does not interrupt the presenters or the other program attendees.<br />Thank you for your cooperation.<br />ACUHO-I Annual Conference & Exposition <br />Program Committee<br />
    2. 2. Celebrating Success and Envisioning Your Dream for the Future: Mid and Senior Level Women&apos;s Career Advancement Workshop<br />Dr. Julie Payne Kirchmeier, Southern Illinois University Carbondale<br />Ann Marie Klotz, DePaul University<br />Laura A. Berry, University of Southern Indiana<br />
    3. 3. Why this topic is important?<br />
    4. 4. What this presentation is…<br />A workshop for you<br />An avenue to identify gender gaps <br />A forum to discuss qualities and skills need to advance in Housing and Residence Life<br />A session to help you take control of your career path<br />
    5. 5. Research<br />
    6. 6. Women in Higher Ed<br />37%<br />in faculty positions<br />47%<br />in administration<br />31%<br />at public institutions<br />
    7. 7. 60%<br />in middle management<br />
    8. 8. Since 1985<br />8100<br />more doctoral degrees than men <br />
    9. 9. Why?<br />
    10. 10. Historical Context<br />Women in the workforce<br />Women’s access to higher education<br />Environment of business, industry, higher ed<br />Women’s leadership styles<br />Affirmative action policies<br />
    11. 11. Lack of female mentors<br />Family responsibilities<br />Leadership aspirations<br />Networking issues<br />Lack of advanced degrees<br />Geographical mobility<br />Social roles<br />
    12. 12. Where<br />do Ibegin?<br />
    13. 13. Envisioning<br />Activity<br />
    14. 14. If you could have any job in our field what would it be?<br />What makes it your ideal job?<br />What skills do you need to acquire to get there?<br />How would your life change if you had that job?<br />What are 3 things you can do in the next 6 months to get you closer to your ideal job?<br />
    15. 15. Career Mapping<br />
    16. 16. Are you ready?<br />What are my core values?<br />Am I ready for change?<br />Support network?<br />
    17. 17. Introspection <br /> and Reflection<br />
    18. 18. Career Goals<br />Immediate<br />Long term<br />
    19. 19. Work Environment<br />Public vs Private<br />Comprehensive vs undergraduate<br />Large, medium, small student population<br />Traditional vs newer<br />Region of country or globe<br />
    20. 20. Institutional Culture<br />Professional/business environment<br />Relaxed, casual environment<br />How do people treat each other in this environment <br />Type of supervision I want or need<br />
    21. 21. Career Path<br />
    22. 22. Networking on <br />Your own<br />Behalf<br />
    23. 23. Support network<br />
    24. 24. Interviewing<br />and<br />Negotiating<br />
    25. 25. Interviewing<br />
    26. 26. Negotiating<br />
    27. 27. Staying connectedLinkedIn<br />
    28. 28. Contact Information<br />Dr. Julie Payne Kirchmeier<br />Email: jpkirch@siu.edu<br />Phone: 618 453 1069<br />Ann Marie Klotz<br />Email: aklotz@depaul.edu<br />Phone: 773 325 4295<br />Laura A. Berry<br />Email: lberry@usi.edu<br />Phone: 812 468 2222<br />

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