DelineDene visit Hiroshima, 1998<br />“Recent investigations in the field of radium poisoning have led to the conclusion t...
Dene, Metis, First Nations<br />Dene: First Nations group of peoples living in Northern Canada; those near Bear Lake are k...
Port Radium Mine / Eldorado / SombaKe<br />In the 1930s, when the LaBine brothers go prospecting, they were looking for Ra...
Radium and the Dial Painters<br />
Transport<br />Ore travels approximately 1000 miles by boat and ground transportation from Port Radium, NWT, to Ft. Mc Mur...
Ore transported to U.S. for research or processing<br />University of Chicago<br />Berkeley, CA<br />Oak Ridge, TN<br />Lo...
Problem of Uranium<br />Uranium naturally exists as an isotope Uranium-238<br />Fissionable uranium is U-235, also a natur...
Making: Uranium processing<br />Cut Uranium<br />Pitchblende, the most common ore, from which radium also comes<br />Yello...
Making: Uranium enrichment<br />Electromagnetic separation via Calutron<br />Gaseous diffusion<br />
K 25, Oak Ridge, Tennessee<br />
Scope of Manhattan Project<br />Plutonium Production<br />Research<br />Research<br />Research<br />Refining  and Enrichin...
Plutonium<br /><ul><li> Artificial element, created by bombarding Uranium-238        	with neutrons
 Decay process yields Plutonium-239</li></li></ul><li>A brief history: WWII<br />1933 – Hitler is elected Chancellor of Ge...
Tokyo Rose/Iva Toguri<br />“Tokyo Rose” was a nickname US servicemen gave to the women on Japanese radio during the War.  ...
Trinity test<br />July 16, 1945<br />Plutonium bomb<br />The first man-made atomic bomb explosion<br />Oppenheimer: <br />...
Trinity site<br />
Little Boy: Hiroshima<br />August 6, 1945<br />Uranium bomb<br />130,000-140,000 killed due to blast<br />
Little Boy: Hiroshima<br />
Fat Man: Nagasaki<br />August 9, 1945<br />Plutonium bomb<br />70,000-80,000 killed due to blast<br />
Fat Man: Nagasaki<br />
U.S.-Soviet Relations Post-War<br /> In 1945, after the atomic bombs were dropped, the issue of nuclear weaponry became an...
Atomic Bomb Testing<br />A huge number of tests by numerous countries<br />Atmospheric tests<br />Open sea tests<br />Unde...
Atomic Bomb Testing<br />
Atomic Bomb Testing Locations<br />Nearly 2,000 tests of nuclear weapons since 1945<br />
Nuclear Weapons today<br />
Uranium mining today<br />The search for alternatives to fossil fuels has increased the likelihood that formerly abandoned...
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Burning Vision Dramaturgy Presentation

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Burning Vision Dramaturgy Presentation

  1. 1.
  2. 2. DelineDene visit Hiroshima, 1998<br />“Recent investigations in the field of radium poisoning have led to the conclusion that precautions are necessary even in the handling of materials of low radioactivity. The ingestion of small amounts of radioactive dust or emanation [radon] over a long period of time will cause a build up of radioactive material in the body, which eventually may have serious consequences. Lung cancer, bone necrosis and rapid anemia are possible diseases due to deposition of radioactive substances in the cell tissue or bone structure of the body.” [Canada, Department of Mines, 1931]<br />
  3. 3. Dene, Metis, First Nations<br />Dene: First Nations group of peoples living in Northern Canada; those near Bear Lake are known as SahtuDene; those near the Mackenzie River are Slavey<br />Métis: decendents of the marriages between French-Canadian trappers and First Nations peoples – one of the three main groups of recognized aboriginal people in Canada<br />First Nations: those aboriginal peoples in Canada who are neither Inuit or Métis as recognized under the Canadian constitution.<br />Inuit: Arctic tribes; the third designation of aboriginal peoples in Canadian law.<br />
  4. 4. Port Radium Mine / Eldorado / SombaKe<br />In the 1930s, when the LaBine brothers go prospecting, they were looking for Radium, which occurs naturally as a biproduct of uranium decay – the uranium ore itself was thought to be useless after the radium was extracted<br />
  5. 5. Radium and the Dial Painters<br />
  6. 6. Transport<br />Ore travels approximately 1000 miles by boat and ground transportation from Port Radium, NWT, to Ft. Mc Murray, Alberta<br />
  7. 7. Ore transported to U.S. for research or processing<br />University of Chicago<br />Berkeley, CA<br />Oak Ridge, TN<br />Los Alamos, NM<br />
  8. 8. Problem of Uranium<br />Uranium naturally exists as an isotope Uranium-238<br />Fissionable uranium is U-235, also a naturally-occurring isotope, but makes up only 0.72% of uranium supply<br />Multiple problems were encountered in trying to decide the best way of acquiring the necessary amounts of U-235 – a.k.a., highly-enriched uranium (HEU)<br />
  9. 9. Making: Uranium processing<br />Cut Uranium<br />Pitchblende, the most common ore, from which radium also comes<br />Yellowcake, an intermediate stage<br />
  10. 10. Making: Uranium enrichment<br />Electromagnetic separation via Calutron<br />Gaseous diffusion<br />
  11. 11. K 25, Oak Ridge, Tennessee<br />
  12. 12. Scope of Manhattan Project<br />Plutonium Production<br />Research<br />Research<br />Research<br />Refining and Enriching Uranium<br />Research<br />
  13. 13. Plutonium<br /><ul><li> Artificial element, created by bombarding Uranium-238 with neutrons
  14. 14. Decay process yields Plutonium-239</li></li></ul><li>A brief history: WWII<br />1933 – Hitler is elected Chancellor of Germany, he quickly accumulates power until he secures a dictatorship<br />1937 – Japanese invade Manchuria<br />1938 – Germany annexes Austria<br />March, 1939 – Germany invades and annexes Czechoslovakia<br />Sept. 1, 1939 – Germany invades Poland and war officially begins<br />May, 1940 – Germany invades Benelux and France; Paris falls one month later<br />September, 1940 – Tripartite Pact links Germany, Italy and Japan together as the “Axis”<br />June, 1941 – Germany invades USSR<br />Dec. 7, 1941 – Japan bombs Pearl Harbor, US enters the war<br />
  15. 15. Tokyo Rose/Iva Toguri<br />“Tokyo Rose” was a nickname US servicemen gave to the women on Japanese radio during the War. The name was not used by the women on the air.<br />Toguri was an American citizen, born in L.A.; was visiting relatives in Japan and got stuck there during the war. Never renounced her citizenship and worked for Radio Tokyo for $7/month. She was convicted of treason by U.S. court in 1949, and served 6 years in prison. She was pardoned in 1977 by Pres. Ford after a Chicago Tribune reporter uncovered fraudulent testimony at her trial.<br />
  16. 16. Trinity test<br />July 16, 1945<br />Plutonium bomb<br />The first man-made atomic bomb explosion<br />Oppenheimer: <br />“I am become Death, destroyer of worlds”<br />
  17. 17.
  18. 18. Trinity site<br />
  19. 19. Little Boy: Hiroshima<br />August 6, 1945<br />Uranium bomb<br />130,000-140,000 killed due to blast<br />
  20. 20. Little Boy: Hiroshima<br />
  21. 21. Fat Man: Nagasaki<br />August 9, 1945<br />Plutonium bomb<br />70,000-80,000 killed due to blast<br />
  22. 22. Fat Man: Nagasaki<br />
  23. 23. U.S.-Soviet Relations Post-War<br /> In 1945, after the atomic bombs were dropped, the issue of nuclear weaponry became an international issue<br /> The U.S. (led by Presidents Truman and Eisenhower) and the U.S.S.R. (lead until 1953 by Josef Stalin) had been allies in WWII, but the alliance was not to last<br />In the late 1940s, a series of “red scares” and public hearings on communism<br />1947: House Unamerican Activities Committee (a standing committee of the U.S. House of Representatives, holds hearings on communists in Hollywood, initiating the Blacklist<br />1947: Joseph McCarthy elected to the U.S. Senate<br />1948: Alger Hiss espionage trial<br />1950: McCarthy reports that he has a list of “205 communists” in the U.S. State Department, triggering another series of hearings.<br />1949: USSR successfully tests its first atomic weapon, with assistance from information provided by Los Alamos scientists, notably Hans Fuchs<br />
  24. 24. Atomic Bomb Testing<br />A huge number of tests by numerous countries<br />Atmospheric tests<br />Open sea tests<br />Underwater tests<br />Extra-atmospheric tests<br />Below-ground testing<br />Tested not only bomb <br /> destruction, but also for civil <br /> defense strategies<br />Construction methods<br />Clothing<br />Food<br />Cars, trucks, tanks, ships<br />Water towers and other infrastructure<br />
  25. 25. Atomic Bomb Testing<br />
  26. 26. Atomic Bomb Testing Locations<br />Nearly 2,000 tests of nuclear weapons since 1945<br />
  27. 27. Nuclear Weapons today<br />
  28. 28. Uranium mining today<br />The search for alternatives to fossil fuels has increased the likelihood that formerly abandoned mine sites (like Port Radium) could become actively explored and mined again in the future<br />

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