• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Facts about port au-prince
 

Facts about port au-prince

on

  • 3,978 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,978
Views on SlideShare
3,978
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft Word

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Facts about port au-prince Facts about port au-prince Document Transcript

    • Adapted from: http://geography.about.com/od/haitimaps/a/portauprince.htm<br />Port au Prince is the capital and largest city in Haiti. The metro region of Port au Prince is dense with a population of over two million but like the rest of Haiti, the majority of the population in Port au Prince is extremely poor although there are some wealthier areas within the city.<br />The following is a list of the ten most important things to know about Port au Prince:<br />1) Much of Haiti's capital city was destroyed in a catastrophic magnitude 7.0 earthquake which hit near Port au Prince on January 12, 2010. The death toll in the earthquake was in the thousands and most of Port au Prince's central historic district, its capital building, the parliament building, as well as other city infrastructure such as hospitals were destroyed.<br />2) The city of Port au Prince was officially incorporated in 1749 and in 1770 it replaced Cap-Français as the capital of the French colony of Saint-Domingue.<br />3) Modern-day Port au Prince is located on a natural harbor on the Gulf of Gonâve which has allowed it to sustain more economic activity than other areas of Haiti.<br />4) Port au Prince is Haiti's export center. The most common exports leaving Haiti through Port au Prince are coffee and sugar. Food processing is also common in Port au Prince.<br />5) The population of Port au Prince is difficult to know because of large slums in the hills near the city.<br />6) Businesses are near the water, and residences are in the hills next to the business areas.<br />7) Port au Prince is divided into areas that each have their own mayor. The city's general mayor is in charge of the whole city.<br />8) Port au Prince has several schools which range from large universities to smaller schools. The State University of Haiti is also located in Port au Prince.<br />9) Port au Prince museums have artifacts from explorers like Christopher Columbus and historic buildings. Many of these buildings were damaged in the January 2010,earthquake.<br />10) Recently, tourism has become an important part of Port au Prince's economy, however most tourist activity focuses around the city's historic districts and affluent areas.<br />Adapted from: http://www.katw.org/pages/sitepage.cfm?id=154<br />Interview with Farah: This is Farah. She is ten years old. She lives in Haiti. What is your name? How old are you? Farah Dieudonne. I am 10 years old. Where do you live? What is your home like? I live in Okap. My home is good. What are you favorite things to do? Do you do them alone or with others? My favorite thing to do is to play. Everyone plays with everyone. What do you like to eat? What do you dislike eating? Meat including chicken and goat. I dislike eating wheat porridge. What do you think you will do when you grow up? I want to be a doctor. What do you do on your birthday? On my birthday I eat cake. Who is in your family? I am the only child in my family. What is your favorite color? Why? Pink, and the color red because it's the color of blood. Do you have things to do every day that you don't like doing? What are they? I don't like to wash dishes. What is your favorite thing to wear? Why? I like to wear jeans and t-shirts. Who is the most important person in your life? Why? My father who is in Santa Domingo. When I cry, he treats me well and hugs me. What would be the best thing someone could give you? A house. What is your day like? Every day I play with dolls. What questions do you have for children in other countries? First, I'd like to tell them that I love them! And ask, how do they live?<br />Adapted from: http://www.katw.org/pages/sitepage.cfm?id=154<br />Interview with Micanor: This is Micanor. He is ten years old. He lives in Haiti. What is your name? Can you write or spell your name for me? How old are you? Micanor St. Julien. I am 10 years old. Where do you live? What is your home like? Live in Okap. My home is good. What are you favorite things to do? Do you do them alone or with others? My favorite thing to do is play with the ball. Everyone plays with everyone. What do you like to eat? What do you dislike eating? I like eating sweet potato. I dislike eating wheat porridge. What do you think you will do when you grow up? I want to be an airplane pilot. What do you do on your birthday? On my birthday I eat meat, sticky rice, drink coke, and I get gifts. <br />Who is in your family? I have 2 sisters and 5 brothers in my family. <br />What is your favorite color? Why? Apricot yellow (Haitian way of saying orange) because I like to eat oranges. Do you have things to do every day that you don't like doing? What are they? I don't like to eat. What is your favorite thing to wear? Why? I like to wear suits with a vest and a tie. Who is the most important person in your life? Why? My brother Jack, he's older than me. What would be the best thing someone could give you? A house. What is your day like? Everyday I dance and play. What questions do you have for children in other countries? Are they eating corn mill? Are they living relaxed lives?<br />Adapted from: http://www.katw.org/pages/sitepage.cfm?id=154<br />Interview with Pierreline: This is Pierreline. She is ten years old. She lives in Haiti. What is your name? How old are you? Pierreline Beja. I am 10 years old. Where do you live? What is your home like? I live in Kabaret. My home is good. What are you favorite things to do? Do you do them alone or with others? My favorite thing to do is play with dogs. Everyone plays with everyone. What do you like to eat? What do you dislike eating? I like spaghetti. I dislike eating wheat porridge. What do you think you will do when you grow up? I want to be a professor. Who is in your family? I have 1 brother and 2 sisters in my family. What is your favorite color? Why? Red because I like it. <br />Do you have things to do every day that you don't like doing? What are they? I don't like to sweep the porch. What is your favorite thing to wear? Why? I like to wear jean skirts with a blouse. Who is the most important person in your life? Why? My sister Modelin. What would be the best thing someone could give you? A gift. What is your day like? Everyday I make food. What questions do you have for children in other countries? Do they eat well?<br /> <br />January 13, 2010<br />An Earthquake Shakes Haiti<br />The Caribbean nation responds to a deadly, devastating quake<br />By Vickie An<br />A powerful earthquake rocked the Caribbean nation of Haiti on Tuesday. The magnitude 7.0 quake struck 10 miles outside of the country's capital, Port-au-Prince, at 4:53 p.m. Officials fear that tens of thousands of people may be dead. Many people were injured and more are still missing.<br />DANIEL MOREL—AFP/GETTY IMAGESResidents walk past crumbled buildings on Tuesday in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, after a massive earthquake struck the poor Caribbean nation.<br />A Big Jolt<br />Tuesday's tremor was the strongest to hit the region since 1770, said Kristin Marano of the U.S. Geological Survey. The quake leveled thousands of buildings, from schools to the National Palace, the President's home. The tremors cut off electricity and phone service. Neighborhoods were crushed, leaving tens of thousands of people homeless.<br />The tremor was also felt in the neighboring island of Cuba and in the Dominican Republic, which is also part of the island of Hispaniola, along with Haiti. No major damages were reported in either country.<br />Strong aftershocks continued to shake up Port-au-Prince's 2 million residents after the initial tremor died down. Stunned survivors walked through the rubble searching for loved ones, coworkers and neighbors. Many people found comfort by gathering together in public squares to sing hymns.<br />Helping Haiti<br />Haiti is the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere. About 80% of the country's 9 million people live in poverty. Years of political turmoil have left Haiti with no real safety standards for buildings. In November 2008, after the collapse of a school, the mayor of Port-au-Prince estimated that more than half of the city's buildings were unsafe.<br />President Barack Obama and other world leaders were quick to offer support for Haiti and its people. " We have to be there for them in their hour of need," Obama said. A U.S. disaster relief team is flying into the area today, said Rajiv Shah of the U.S. Agency for International Development. International aid groups, including the Red Cross, have also announced plans to send aid.<br />The hospitals that weren't damaged in the quake are overflowing with victims. Help can't come soon enough. " Haiti needs to pray," said Dr. Louis-Gerard Gilles. " We all need to pray together." <br />At a glance: Haiti<br />Adapted from: http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/haiti.html<br />In 2004 Haiti’s President Aristide was forced to flee the country. Since then Haiti has suffered from violence and disorganization. Basic services like food, water and medical care are often hard to get. It is also difficult for humanitarian assistance to reach people in need. <br />Because of Haiti’s high population and its weak government, the country is vulnerable to natural disasters such as floods, mudslides and hurricanes. <br />Issues facing children in Haiti <br />Haiti has the highest rates of infant, under-five and maternal mortality in the Western hemisphere. Diarrhea, respiratory infections, malaria, tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS are the leading causes of death.<br />Some 60 per cent of people, primarily in rural areas, lack access to basic health-care services.<br />Only a little over half of primary school-age children are enrolled in school. Less than 2 per cent of children finish secondary school.<br />Approximately 1,000 children are working as messengers, spies and even soldiers for armed gangs in Port Au Prince.<br />Activities and results for children <br />Thanks to supplies, medical equipment and UNICEF, children receive more immunizations than ever. Haiti has been free of measles and polio since 2001; 824,000 children were inoculated against polio in 2005. <br />UNICEF provided medical equipment and training to reopen health facilities that had been closed for up to a year. An estimated 75,000 pregnant women are expected to benefit. <br />A Back to School program encouraged 19,000 children and 350 teachers to return to school. UNICEF helped communities build 55 new schools, which will educate an additional 20,000 children. UNICEF also provided water and sanitation supplies for 75 schools, and led classes on safe hygiene. <br />UNICEF and its partners continued to provide relief for victims of a September 2004 hurricane in Gonaives, which affected 300,000 people. In addition to food, water, sanitation, and vaccinations, thousands of children received identification cards, birth certificates and psychosocial support and counselling.<br />http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/haiti.html<br /> http://www.katw.org/pages/sitepage.cfm?id=154<br />National Palace<br />UN Peacekeeping Headquarters<br />Tax Office<br />Martissant health centre <br />Solidarite maternity hospital<br />Doctors Without Borders Trinité trauma center hospital<br />Taiwan embassy<br />Central cathedral<br />World Bank offices in Petionville<br />Hotel Montana<br />Castel Haiti <br />College Canado<br />Caribbean Market<br />Main prison (with reports of escaped inmates)<br />Damage to the airport reported<br />Schools and homes around Port-au-Prince<br />Road to Canape Vert, a suburb of Port-au-Prince<br />http://www.nowpublic.com/world/haiti-earthquake-damage-list-compounds-destroyed<br />