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  • Every year the National Institute of Health funds hundreds of research projects. The researchers who do these projects often publish their results in subscription-based academic journals. Approximately 80,000 articles per year arise from NIH funds. Because this research is funded by federal government money, the government decided it (and the tax-paying public) had a right to see the results of the research being done (aka: the journal articles).
  • Since most people and many libraries can't afford to subscribe to expensive medical journals,they passed a law requiring the researchers who publish their research results in subscription-based journals to post their articles in a free online digital library called PubMedCentral.
  • PubMedCentral (PMC) is the NIH's free digital archive of biomedical and life sciences journal literature and it's run by the NIH, NLM (National Library of Medicine), and NCBI (National Center for Biotech Info). http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/Researchers who get money from the NIH are required to submit their articles to the PubMedCentral within 12 months of publication.This only include peer-reviewed journal articles. NOT: Book chaptersEditorialsConference proceedingsNewslettersData sets DOES include:It does also include: All articles that arise directly from their awards, even if you are not an author or co-authorDates: You must comply if you get: Any direct funding from an NIH grant or cooperative agreement active in Fiscal Year 2008 or beyondAny direct funding from an NIH contract signed on or after April 7, 2008
  • Don’t be confused by the two similarly titled databases! PubMedCentral: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/PubMed: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/PubMed: is mostly just citations includes other things than full-text peer-reviewed journal articles goes back to 1948. Includes PMC in it.
  • Anyone who gets any funding from: an NIH grant or cooperative agreement the NIH Intramural Program if NIH pays your salary
  • All principal investigators and their institutions
  • You need to submit your article to PMC upon its being accepted by a journal for publication. Your articles doesn’t, however, need to be made available to the public right away.You can create an embargo/delay for up to 12 months. Your article, however, must available to the public in PMC 12 months after it appears in the journal and no later. You need to do this if you receive: Any funding from an NIH grant active in Fiscal Year 2008 or beyond or Any funding from an NIH contract signed on or after April 7, 2008
  • You could lose current and future NIH fundingYour institution could lose current and future fundingIf you post an article to which you do not have sufficient rights, you could also face legal trouble from the journal/publisher for copyright infringement.
  • I know this is a lot of work but there’s a lot of good that comes out of it. More researchers will be able to see your paper and will refer to it in their future works. Your citation rankings will go up. You, as a researcher, will be able to see other people’s papers despite libraries having to cancel their journal subscriptions because of budget cutbacks.The public, who basically paid for the research with their tax dollars will be able to see the results of the research they funded.You’ll be better prepared for pending future Open Access laws from other agencies (eg: NSF)Ultimately you’ll help advance science and ultimately, improve human health.
  • Most journal publishers make you sign over all your copyright to them. You need to work with your publisher before you sign any publication contract to ensure the contract allows you to deposit your article in PMC. Most journals are familiar with the NIH requirements so it is not an issue.
  • Individual copyright agreements can take many forms. Some universities have specific legal language they want you to use. You should consult your institution's legal counsel to see if it has any specific policies or contract addendums. The MD Anderson Cancer Center does NOT have specific language it wants you to use so you need to create your own.
  • The NIH recommends adding the following language to your contract with your publisher.
  • It’s a good idea to come to an agreement with your publisher about the following as well.
  • The NIH Public Access site has helpful info on Copyright.
  • Penn State College of Medicine "Penn St. Copyright Addendum“ http://med.psu.edu/web/library/resources/pathfinders/pmcYale University "PubMed Cover Letter, Addendum, and Instructions“ http://www.yale.edu/grants/toolkit/index.htmlStanford School of Medicine "Stanford Copyright Addendum“ http://lane.stanford.edu/help/openaccess/nihpolicy.htmlNorris Medical Library http://www.usc.edu/hsc/nml/lib-information/nih/cover-letter.pdfWashington University http://becker.wustl.edu/pdf/NIH-Addendum-509.pdf
  • Here’s an example of an Author Adendumfrom Penn State College of Medicine. http://med.psu.edu/c/document_library/get_file?folderId=660446&name=DLFE-8312.pdfEach school uses different language. It’s up to you to figure out which is the best for your needs.
  • There are FOUR Submission methods. Some involve the final ARTICLE as it appears in the journal (with the journal's fonts, pagination, columns, etc.) Some involve the final peer-reviewed MANUSCRIPT (the version accepted for publication that includes all the modifications made in response to the peer review process. (without the journal's fonts, etc.)
  • In Method A, the publisher does it for you but the PI still needs to give: approval of the submitted materials (the PDF Receipt)approval of the final web version of the manuscript.
  • Here is a list of all the journals that do it for you: http://publicaccess.nih.gov/submit_process_journals.htm
  • If your journal publisher does not automatically publish all NIH articles to PubMed Central, you can contact them and see if they will deposit your specific article to PMC.Some do. Submission Methods A and B use the journal publisher’s final ARTICLE. Submission Methods C and D use the peer-reviewed MANUSCRIPT.
  • Submission Method C can be done by author, or someone in the author’s organization.
  • You upload your manuscript to PubMed Central through an online database called NIHMS= “National Institute of Health Manuscript Submission System”http://www.nihms.nih.gov/. You will need the NIH grant number(s)Grantee’s full nameAuthors’ full namesthe final peer-reviewed manuscriptany supporting figures, tables, charts, graphics, and supplementary data that were submitted to the publisherWhen do you do this? When the manuscript is accepted for publication. You can have an embargo date (delay period) of up to 12 months after date of publication. CHOOSE eRA Commons
  • It’s a relatively easy system and walks you through the process. Log in to NIHMS, create an accountEnter basic information about the grant, the journal, and upload your files.
  • The system tries to help you as much as possible.
  • Upload a copy of the accepted peer-reviewed manuscript files(s). NOT the final article!Remember in most cases you can NOT use the publisher’s pdf copyYou need to upload all the files individually (text, images, charts, graphs, etc.) NIHMS merges the manuscript files into one viewable document.
  • Upload files individually (text, charts, graphs, etc.). You can upload a wide variety of formats: Word, Word Perfect, PDF, PowerPoint, Excel, etc.The NIHMS system will organize the files and generate a pdf from them. The way the document appears in PMC may be a little different than what you expect. The systems places the files in a weird order. The pdf the systems creates for you will have all your charts, graphs, etc. will be stuck at the end of the document after the References. Example: Take a look at the pdf for: “Right Aortic Arch and Coarctation: A Rare Association” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1805694/?tool=pubmedAfter you submit your manuscript, you’ll need to respond to an email approving the PDF and the release date. if the submitter is not the PI, both the PI and the submitter need to respond.
  • Submission Method D: Some publishers start the submission process for you in NIHMS but you must complete it. They deposit your final peer-reviewed manuscript for you and determine the number of months after publication when the article may be made publicly available in PMC. You are required to finish the submission process in NIHMS. You’ll be notified by the publisher to log into the NIHMS to review and ok the manuscript. You’ll need to reply to emails from NIH to complete the submission. Warning: This is generally an author-pay model-which costs money.
  • When you submit your article, it will be assigned a PMCID (PubMed Central ID number) and an NIHMS number. You must include the PMCID in: progress reports renewals new grant applicationsFor detailed information on where exactly you need to include the PMCID in your documents, see: "Reminder Concerning Grantee Compliance with Public Access Policy and Related NIH Monitoring Activities“ at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/not-od-08-119.html
  • Please note: the PMCID is NOT the same thing as the PMID number (PubMed ID number). The PMCID number appears on the article in both PubMed and PubMed Central.
  • Here’s an example of an online record that includes both PMCID and PMID.
  • If you only have the PMID, you can find out the PMCID using the PMCID Converter at:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/pmctopmid
  • Citation is fairly easy when you have the PMCID number. But unfortunately, you don’t get that right away. What do you do in the mean time if you have to cite your article before you get your PMCID?
  • Use these citation methods until you get your PMCID number. The NIHMSID is just a temporary number you get until you receive your PMCID.
  • There is more info on how and when to cite at the NIHPA website.
  • The institution has just upgraded to EndNote X4. You can request an upgrade through preferred software: http://teams/depts/itsvc/4info/_layouts/FormServer.aspx?XsnLocation=http://teams/depts/itsvc/4info/Preferred%20Software%20Requests/Forms/template.xsn&OpenIn=browser&SaveLocation=http%3A%2F%2Fteams%2Fdepts%2Fitsvc%2F4info%2FPreferred%20Software%20Requests&_InfoPath_Sentinel=1. EndNote X4 will automatically bring in the PMCID’s when you import citations from PubMed.
  • You can select the NIH style in EndNote X4. This style will format your citations correctly for you.

Kate and laurissa nih final Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Kate Krause, MLIS Institutional Repository Coordinator The Texas Medical Center Library Laurissa Gann, MSLS Outreach LibrarianResearch Medical Library, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center March, 2011
  • 2. Kate Krause, MLIS Laurissa Gann, MSLS Institutional Repository Coordinator Outreach Librarian The Texas Medical Center Library Research Medical Library, kathryn.krause@exch.library.tmc.edu UT MD Anderson Cancer Center lgann@mdanderson.orghttp://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 3. 1. Overview of the Policy 2. Who Has to Comply? 3. When do you Have to Comply? 4. How to Secure the Required Copyright 5. How to Submit your Article 6. How to Cite your Article 7. How to Cite with EndNote 8. More Information Sources 9. Questions and Answershttp://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 4. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 5. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 6. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 7. PubMed Central (PMC):  Online database of full-text, peer- reviewed journal articles PubMed:  Online database of citations of articles in biomedical literaturehttp://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 8. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 9. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 10. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 11. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 12. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 13. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 14. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 15. “Journal acknowledges that Author retains the right to provide a copy of the final peer-reviewed manuscript to the NIH upon acceptance for Journal publication, for public archiving in PubMed Central as soon as possible but no later than 12 months after publication by Journal.”http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 16. Your agreement with the publisher should also stipulate:  Which submission method will be used  Which version of the document will be uploaded to PMC: the manuscript or the article  Who will submit the document  When will it be submitted  Who will approve the submission  When it will be made public on PMChttp://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 17. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 18. If you’d like to see how other institutions do it, some have made their contract language and cover letters public:  Penn State College of Medicine "Penn St. Copyright Addendum"  Yale University "PubMed Cover Letter, Addendum, and Instructions"  Stanford School of Medicine "Stanford Copyright Addendum“  Norris Medical Library  Washington Universityhttp://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 19. AMENDMENT TO PUBLICATION AGREEMENT THIS Amendment, effective as of the last date of signature hereon, modifies the attached Publication Agreement concerning the following Article: ______________________________________________________________________________ (Manuscript title) ______________________________________________________________________________ (Journal name) The parties to the Publication Agreement and to this Amendment are: ______________________________________________________________________________ (“Author”), and ______________________________________________________________________________ (“Publisher”). 1. The parties agree that wherever there is any conflict between this Amendment and the Publication Agreement, the provisions of this Amendment are paramount and the Publication Agreement shall be construed accordingly. 2. Notwithstanding any terms in the Publication Agreement to the contrary and in addition to the rights retained by Author or licensed by Publisher to Author in the Publication Agreement and any fair use rights of Author, Author and Publisher agree that the Author shall also retain the following rights: "Journal acknowledges that Author retains the right to provide a copy of the final manuscript to the NIH upon acceptance for Journal publication, for public archiving in PubMed Central as soon as possible but no later than 12 months after publication by Journal." 3. Final Agreement. This Amendment and the Publication Agreement, taken together, constitute the final agreement between the Author and the Publisher with respect to the publication of the Article and allocation of rights under copyright in the Article. Any modification of or additions to the terms of this Amendment or to the Publication Agreement must be in writing and executed by both Publisher and Author in order to be effective. AUTHOR PUBLISHER ____________________________ ______________________________ ____________________________ ______________________________ Date Datehttp://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 20. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 21. a. Publish in a journal that deposits all final published articles in PubMed Central (PMC) without author involvementhttp://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 22. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 23. a. Publish in a journal that deposits all final published articles in PubMed Central (PMC) without author involvement b. Make arrangements to have the publisher deposit a specific final published article in PubMed Centralhttp://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 24. a. Publish in a journal that deposits all final published articles in PubMed Central (PMC) without author involvement b. Make arrangements to have the publisher deposit a specific final published article in PubMed Central c. Deposit peer-reviewed manuscripts via NIH Manuscript Submission (NIHMS) systemhttp://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 25. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 26. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 27. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 28. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 29. Example: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1805694/?tool=pubmedhttp://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 30. a. Publish in a journal that deposits all final published articles in PubMed Central (PMC) without author involvement b. Make arrangements to have the publisher deposit a specific final published article in PubMed Central c. Deposit peer-reviewed manuscripts via NIH Manuscript Submission (NIHMS) system d. Complete the submission process for a final peer-reviewed manuscript that the publisher has deposited in NIHMShttp://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 31. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 32. PMCID ≠ PMIDhttp://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 33. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 34. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 35.  Doe, John, Smith, Mary. Common Misuse of Insulin-Pumps. Journal of Juvenile Diabetes Studies. 2009 January 31; 145(7): 578-599. PMCID: PMC4842371http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 36. Articles dont get a PMCID number right away.  For Submission Methods A and B, use "PMC Journal - In Process":  Doe, John, Smith, Mary. Common Misuse of Insulin- Pumps. Journal of Juvenile Diabetes Studies. 2009 January 31; 145(7): 578-599. PMCID: PMC Journal - In Process  For Submission Methods C and D, use the NIHMS ID number.  Doe, John, Smith, Mary. Common Misuse of Insulin- Pumps. Journal of Juvenile Diabetes Studies. 2009 January 31; 145(7): 578-599. NIHMSID: NIHMS12345http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 37. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 38. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 39. Papaioannou G, Sebire NJ, McHugh K. Imaging of the unusual pediatric blastomas.Cancer Imaging. 2009 February 25; 9(1):1-11. PMCID: PMC2651735. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 40.  NIH Manuscript Submission System (NIHMS)  http://www.nihms.nih.gov/  NIHMS FAQ  http://www.nihms.nih.gov/help/faq.shtml  NIHMS How To slide shows  http://www.nihms.nih.gov/help/#slideshow  NIHMS Helpdesk  http://www.nihms.nih.gov/db/sub.cgi?page=email&from=faq&mid= NIH Public Access Policy  http://publicaccess.nih.gov/  NIH Public Access FAQ  http://publicaccess.nih.gov/FAQ.htm TMC Library Public Access Policy Page:  http://resource.library.tmc.edu/services/NIHPublicAccess.cfm MD Anderson Cancer Center Library: NIH Manuscript Requirements  http://www.mdanderson.org/education-and-research/education- and-training/schools-and-programs/research-training/programs-and- courses/cancer-prevention-research-training-program/trainee- resources/index.html PubMed Central:  http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.govhttp://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 41. http://publicaccess.nih.gov/
  • 42. Laurissa Gann lgann@mdanderson.org Kathryn Krause kathryn.krause@exch.library.tmc.eduhttp://publicaccess.nih.gov/