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Developing metacognitiveskills
Developing metacognitiveskills
Developing metacognitiveskills
Developing metacognitiveskills
Developing metacognitiveskills
Developing metacognitiveskills
Developing metacognitiveskills
Developing metacognitiveskills
Developing metacognitiveskills
Developing metacognitiveskills
Developing metacognitiveskills
Developing metacognitiveskills
Developing metacognitiveskills
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Developing metacognitiveskills

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  • 1. 1Developing Metacognitive Skillsin our StudentsPresented by Claire MognagaTriValley Teacher Induction ProjectMarch 25, 2010
  • 2. 2Outcomes:Define and articulate the metacognitive strategiesUnderstand the gradual release of responsibilitymodelIncrease repertoire of teaching strategiesUnderstand how to incorporate metacognition intoany content teachingExplore a variety of resources
  • 3. 3Metacognition…What Is It, Really?A person’s conscious awareness and control of his/herthinking processThe difference between a passive and an active learnerWhen done strategically, metacognitive processesoccur before, during, and afterThe center of meaning constructionAccording to Merriam-Webster’s Online Dictionary,metacognition is the “awareness or analysis of one’sown learning or thinking processes”
  • 4. 4Strategies of Proficient Readers:Make ConnectionsPose QuestionsVisualize and Create ImagesDraw InferencesDetermine ImportanceSynthesize InformationMonitor UnderstandingRepair Faulty Comprehension
  • 5. 5Your Turn:In triads, your assignment is toprocess the strategies of proficientreaders using the activity provided toyour team. I will check in with yourteam as you complete this cooperativetask to determine how much time isneeded. Please select a reporter and beprepared to share out both content andprocess with the group.
  • 6. 6Gradual Release of Responsibility Model(Created by Claire Mognaga, 2010; Adapted from the work of Pearson and Gallagher, 1983)Responsibility for Task CompletionTeacher Think-Aloud and ModelingShared ExperiencesMore Explicit Guided ExperiencesCooperative ExperiencesIndependentExperiencesAllStudentJointResponsibilityAllTeacher
  • 7. 7Effective Metacognitive InstructionalPractices:Thinking aloudModelingCreating anchor experiencesConferringPosting and strategically using students’ thinkingaround the classroom to direct instructionConnecting comprehension strategies throughout allcontent areasProviding a variety of experiences for student practiceProviding opportunities for student response andreflection
  • 8. adapted from Keene, PEBC, 1999 8Think-AloudsOne way to model the metacognitive processes we wantto help our students engage with is to make ourinternal thinking “public” through a think-aloudWhen embarking on this strategy, remember to:Select and preview text with attention tomodeling optionsBe precise about why you’re thinking aloudBe precise about when you’re thinking aloudversus reading aloudBe clear about how being metacognitive helpsyou to comprehend
  • 9. 9Incorporating Metacognition into anycurricular area…some examplesWhile we engage in theactivities, you may chooseto copy and use one of theorganizers on the wall torecord your thoughts.
  • 10. adapted from The Major Point Interview forReaders, Keene, 199510Key Questions to use across the curriculum:• Did ___ remind you of anything you know about? (Making Connections)• What did you wonder about ___? What questions do you have about ___ now?(Questioning)• What images did you create in your mind? (Visualizing)• What prediction can you make about ___? What conclusion can you draw from ___?(Inferring)• Are there some parts of ___ that are more important than others? Which parts? Why?(Determining Importance)• If you could tell another person about ___, what would you tell them?(Synthesizing)• What challenges did you have in learning ___? How did you fix them?(Monitoring Comprehension)An essential follow-up question to all those posed above:What do you understand now that you didn’t understand before?
  • 11. 11In Closing -Word Toss…Take a moment to think of one word thatdescribes/summarizes/connects with our worktoday and write it on a post-it. We will usethese to complete a “word toss” activity.Thank you!
  • 12. 12References:Harvey, Stephanie, and Anne Goudvis. 2000. Strategies That Work: TeachingComprehension to Enhance Understanding. Portland, ME: Stenhouse.Harvey, Stephanie. 1998. Nonfiction Matters: Reading, Writing, and Researchin Grades 3-8. York, ME: Stenhouse.Hyde, Arthur. 2006. Comprehending Math: Adapting Reading Strategies to TeachMathematics, K-6. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.Keene, Ellin, and Susan Zimmermann. 1997. Mosaic of Thought: TeachingComprehension in a Reader’s Workshop. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.Miller, Debbie. 2002. Reading with Meaning: Teaching Comprehension in thePrimary Grades. Portland, ME: Stenhouse.
  • 13. 13One last lingering thought…The experiences we have thatdevelop our intellect as matureadults need to be duplicated in theeveryday lives of our students.Ellin KeeneFebruary 22, 2000Denver, Colorado

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