Knowledge Management In China
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  • 1. Knowledge management in China How the Chinese manage knowledge to become more competitive
  • 2. Agenda
    • Agenda
    • Knowledge Management in the U.S.
    • Knowledge Management in Japan
    • How the Chinese approach knowledge management
    • Becoming competitive – a conclusion
  • 3. Knowledge Management in the U.S.
    • Agenda
    • Knowledge Management in the U.S.
    • Knowledge Management in Japan
    • How the Chinese approach knowledge management
    • Becoming competitive – a conclusion
  • 4. Knowledge Management in the U.S.
    • Knowledge management (KM) is the way an organization builds, harnesses and controls knowledge. It is how an organization learns as well as utilizes it learning's.
    • Knowledge exists in two forms: explicit knowledge and tacit knowledge .
    • In the U.S. KM focuses largely on explicit and codified knowledge.
    • Primarily valued when it is explicit and codified and less when it is tacit and contextual.
    • “ If it can not be written in a manual it’s not considered knowledge”
    • Organizational learning focuses on using technology (IT) to capture and distribute explicit and codified knowledge.
    • This enables U.S. organizations to use knowledge warehouses, data mining on a larger scale, as well as it speeds up knowledge diffusion.
  • 5. Knowledge Management in Japan
    • Agenda
    • Knowledge Management in the U.S.
    • Knowledge Management in Japan
    • How the Chinese approach knowledge management
    • Becoming competitive – a conclusion
  • 6. Knowledge Management in Japan
    • In Japan KM focuses largely on tacit and contextual knowledge.
    • Primarily valued when it is tacit and contextual and less when it is explicit and codified.
    • “ Knowledge that can be expressed in words and numbers only represents the tip of the iceberg of the entire body of possible knowledge”
    • Organizational learning focuses on using socialization to create and diffuse socially depended and subjective knowledge.
    • This enables Japanese organizations to widely share knowledge across hierarchies (kaizen) and organizational borders (keiretsu).
  • 7. Knowledge Management in Japan Explicit knowledge (objective) Tacit knowledge (subjective) The Knowledge Space U.S. Japan
  • 8. How the Chinese approach knowledge management
    • Agenda
    • Knowledge Management in the U.S.
    • Knowledge Management in Japan
    • How the Chinese approach knowledge management
    • Becoming competitive – a conclusion
  • 9. How the Chinese approach knowledge management
    • The Chinese favor informal and implicit forms of communication
    • In China KM focuses on tacit and contextual knowledge, but knowledge includes both objective and subjective elements.
    • Reliance on interpersonal contact inhibits codification and restricts information access more than technological factors. This makes explicit knowledge rare and restrains the use of data warehouses, data mining and intranet for diffusion of organizational knowledge.
    • Culturally status-based hierarchies restricts vertically transfer of knowledge, common in Japan. This restrains the use of Kaizen and Keiretseu’s.
    • “ The Chinese don’t use manuals and don’t learn from the bottom up. All learning processes have a tendency to come from top down.”
    • Example:“New product development is typically viewed as an engineering rather than a marketing function”
  • 10. Knowledge Management in Japan Explicit knowledge (objective) Tacit knowledge (subjective) The Knowledge Space China
  • 11. Becoming competitive – a conclusion
    • Agenda
    • Knowledge Management in the U.S.
    • Knowledge Management in Japan
    • How the Chinese approach knowledge management
    • Becoming competitive – a conclusion
  • 12. Becoming competitive – a conclusion
    • China is experiencing a clash of two cultures in KM. The use focus on explicit vs. tacit knowledge in organizational learning processes.
    • Effective KM today is a competitive necessity in technology-based and information-intensive industries.
    • What can the Chinese government do to facilitate a solution that overcomes the limitations China face in it’s Management of Knowledge?