BATS
Dave Schmidt, CWCP, ACP
ALL OUT Wildlife Control, LLC
The Low Down (or High Up)
• Bats are our only flying mammals. They are not
rodents.
• They live in colonies that can numbe...
Little Brown Bat

• One of Missouri’s most common bats
• They look fierce but are very beneficial, eating
thousands of ins...
Bats in jeopardy
• White Nose Syndrome, a fungal disease, is affecting
bats in the Eastern part of the United States. It i...
Why you don’t want… bats in your
belfry
• Rabies
• Droppings support insect/fungus
populations
• In substantial population...
How do you know a building has
bats?
• The most obvious sign is
guano, or bat droppings.
• Guano can be observed
in an att...
What building inspectors can look
for
• Rodent and termite inspections are relatively
common, but not necessarily bats.
• ...
Building Inspectors cont.
• Some inspectors check the attic from the scuttle
hole and look for droppings, nesting material...
Building inspectors cont.
• Keep in mind that bats can use any entry
hole that is 3/16‖ or smaller. This may
require the a...
Visible signs building inspectors
can watch for
• Bat urine stains on
soffit
Guano close-up
An extreme build-up of guano
Bat entry
• Bat entry between
siding courses
Bat Entry
• The dark smudges
indicate a well-used
bat entry
Bat entry
DON’T TRY THIS AT HOME
(or anywhere else)
• Fumigation, repellents, traps and poisons
• ALL OUT Wildlife Control, LLC
STRO...
• Human behavior, habitat loss and disease
have reduced many bat populations
• Because of their importance to the
ecosyste...
When do bats mate and raise
young?
• Bat breeding season is in late fall, just before
they hibernate. Birthing occurs from...
What if you find one?
• Don’t panic. Bats are not aggressive and
will avoid you if possible.
• However, be respectful of t...
• Take the bat to the Health Department.
They may want to test it for rabies and/or
White Nose or other diseases.
• Call y...
This is the form they will likely have
you complete at the Health Dept.
How are bats removed?
• Removing one live bat from a home can
sometimes be done with a net and other tools.
Keep in mind t...
What costs can you expect?
• The cost of bat removal and exclusion
depends on a number of factors:
– The number of entry h...
• ALL OUT typically does bat removal in two
phases. This is the accepted method of
bat control for wildlife professionals....
Some buildings may require a lift
and/or a second technician.
• A bakery in a nearby
historic area had bats
living above its front
door.
What you should expect for your
money
• Custom-made one-way devices on each
bat entry
• Permanent, weather-tight, high-qua...
Additional options
• We recommend
specially designed
bat houses to our
customers.
• This will allow the
bats to establish ...
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ALL OUT Wildlife Control Bat presentation

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ALL OUT Wildlife Control, LLC spoke to a group of Realtors about bats and their habits--and why they sometimes end up in houses.

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ALL OUT Wildlife Control Bat presentation

  1. 1. BATS Dave Schmidt, CWCP, ACP ALL OUT Wildlife Control, LLC
  2. 2. The Low Down (or High Up) • Bats are our only flying mammals. They are not rodents. • They live in colonies that can number several hundred. All bats in this area feed entirely on night-flying insects. They find prey through echolocation—ultrasonic sounds that humans cannot hear. • They are generally found roosting under the ridges of cedar shake roofs, inside soffits, behind fascia boards, inside cracks on walls, underneath side flashing, in chimneys and behind gutters.
  3. 3. Little Brown Bat • One of Missouri’s most common bats • They look fierce but are very beneficial, eating thousands of insects (including mosquitoes) every night. They will consume one-half their body weight every night. • They weigh approximately ½ ounce. • They are the most common bat found in buildings in the St. Louis area.
  4. 4. Bats in jeopardy • White Nose Syndrome, a fungal disease, is affecting bats in the Eastern part of the United States. It is steadily moving west, decimating bat colonies and causing concern to biologists. It has been found in Missouri but doesn’t seem to be affecting populations—yet.
  5. 5. Why you don’t want… bats in your belfry • Rabies • Droppings support insect/fungus populations • In substantial populations, odor/noises will be present • Exterior stains
  6. 6. How do you know a building has bats? • The most obvious sign is guano, or bat droppings. • Guano can be observed in an attic or as smears along the wood or brick near the entry hole. • In addition to being unsightly, these droppings can contain or encourage insect populations and fungus.
  7. 7. What building inspectors can look for • Rodent and termite inspections are relatively common, but not necessarily bats. • Some inspectors do attic inspections, but not all. • A chimney inspection will not reveal much—bats cannot fly up a chimney. • Some municipal inspectors will check for any opening on the exterior that could allow any animal entry. Typically these must be sealed. However, it is the responsibility of the building owner to do this, and the owner may not know if any animal is still living in the building.
  8. 8. Building Inspectors cont. • Some inspectors check the attic from the scuttle hole and look for droppings, nesting material, holes in sheathing, etc. that would indicate the presence of any animal. It is important to know what sign equals what infestation; i.e., bats do not leave nesting material. • Some inspectors may use a ladder to inspect the attic from the roof.
  9. 9. Building inspectors cont. • Keep in mind that bats can use any entry hole that is 3/16‖ or smaller. This may require the aid of binoculars or ladders, since these holes can be difficult to see with the naked eye. • Walking around the attic with a headlamp will likely reveal droppings if there have been bats in the attic.
  10. 10. Visible signs building inspectors can watch for • Bat urine stains on soffit
  11. 11. Guano close-up
  12. 12. An extreme build-up of guano
  13. 13. Bat entry • Bat entry between siding courses
  14. 14. Bat Entry • The dark smudges indicate a well-used bat entry
  15. 15. Bat entry
  16. 16. DON’T TRY THIS AT HOME (or anywhere else) • Fumigation, repellents, traps and poisons • ALL OUT Wildlife Control, LLC STRONGLY advises our customers against these poor methods of bat removal or control • They do not address the issue (small entry holes that bats can use) and cause further problems
  17. 17. • Human behavior, habitat loss and disease have reduced many bat populations • Because of their importance to the ecosystem, some bats are federally protected. Others are listed as endangered • A professional wildlife service will respect this and use the bats’ biology to exclude them from a building
  18. 18. When do bats mate and raise young? • Bat breeding season is in late fall, just before they hibernate. Birthing occurs from early June through Mid-August. • ALL OUT will not do bat removal and exclusion during these weeks. We must allow the young to develop and be able to fly. This is the industry standard, so be wary if a service is offered during the peak summer months. Many times people will beg us to do the work during the ―blackout‖ period, but that would only make a bad situation worse.
  19. 19. What if you find one? • Don’t panic. Bats are not aggressive and will avoid you if possible. • However, be respectful of the potential hazards, such as a bite to a human or pet. • If the bat is in your home, try to isolate it in one room and close the door. • Put damp towels under the door so it cannot escape through the cracks. • Call a wildlife professional!
  20. 20. • Take the bat to the Health Department. They may want to test it for rabies and/or White Nose or other diseases. • Call your WCO to determine if there are more bats in the building.
  21. 21. This is the form they will likely have you complete at the Health Dept.
  22. 22. How are bats removed? • Removing one live bat from a home can sometimes be done with a net and other tools. Keep in mind that bats live in colonies and the one you see may be one of many. • A professional WCO will install a one-way device that allows bats to leave the building but not return. (Think of a door that locks once you close it) • This is a humane and safe way to remove bats. They will find another place to live. • Once they are gone, your WCO will cover the entry holes so bats cannot use the holes to move back in.
  23. 23. What costs can you expect? • The cost of bat removal and exclusion depends on a number of factors: – The number of entry holes – The style of building and number of stories – The type of roof – The equipment and supplies we will need to use – Accessibility to all exterior areas; i.e., trees, steep slopes
  24. 24. • ALL OUT typically does bat removal in two phases. This is the accepted method of bat control for wildlife professionals. • Phase I involves the bat-proofing of most of the building installation of the one-way device. • Once we are sure the bats have left the building, Phase II is done. This is the closing and sealing of entry holes.
  25. 25. Some buildings may require a lift and/or a second technician.
  26. 26. • A bakery in a nearby historic area had bats living above its front door.
  27. 27. What you should expect for your money • Custom-made one-way devices on each bat entry • Permanent, weather-tight, high-quality materials • A warranty against bat re-entry at the sites that have been sealed • The peace of mind of knowing that you did not harm the bats—but they won’t harm you either
  28. 28. Additional options • We recommend specially designed bat houses to our customers. • This will allow the bats to establish a colony in a safe and appropriate home.

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