Field trip to prairie and poem lesson
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Field trip to prairie and poem lesson

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    Field trip to prairie and poem lesson Field trip to prairie and poem lesson Document Transcript

    • Field Trip to Prairie and PoemName: Laura PastuovicDate: October 20, 2011Grade Level/Subject: Life Science, 3rd gradePrerequisite Knowledge: Basic knowledge and understanding of ecosystems, food chains and webs, and thebalance within an ecosystemApproximate Time: 1 hour (Full class period)Student Objectives/Student Outcomes: Students will be able to identify the colors within a prairie and writeabout different parts of the prairie through making comparisons of colors (using paint swatches). Students willbe able to give details about what they see through writing poems.Student Objectives for ELL students:Students will create original ideas.Students will use both academic content language and basic language to write the poems.Students will compose writings based off their observations.Students will be able to describe what they see through making connections between the paint swatches and thecolors in the prairie.Content Standards:Science:Goal 11: Understand the processes of scientific inquiry and technological design to investigate questions,conduct experiments and solve problems.11.A.2b Collect data for investigations using scientific process skills including observing, estimating andmeasuring.11.A.2c Construct charts and visualizations to display data.English:Goal 3: Write to communicate for a variety of purposes.3.B.2a Generate and organize ideas using a variety of planning strategies (e.g., mapping, outlining, drafting).Materials/Resources/Technology:Field Trip to Doris L. Westfall Nature PreservePencils and MarkersPaint SwatchesMagnifying glassDisposable Camera for each groupCameraPrairie guide and mapColored PencilsNotebooks
    • Implementation: Time10 minutes Opening of lesson: (Objectives, hook, behavior expectations) - Give the students a brief introduction to the prairie on the bus: o The Doris L. Westfall Nature Preserve has 100 native prairie plants with Vermilion County seed origin. The 40 acre prairie is dominated by the tall grasses of Indian grass and Big bluestem, but many other interesting plants are found here, such as Indian paintbrush, puccoon, purple gentian, and Illinois bundleflower. This prairie garden plot is available to help visitors identify the many prairie plants. o Ask the students if any of them have previous experience in a prairie. Allow them to quickly reflect on their experiences. o Handout sheet to students with the rules and expectations of the students in the prairie (given to teacher by the Nature Preserve) - Assign groups for the students to work in (groups of 3)40 mins Procedures: Include critical thinking questions and accommodations for individual needs 1. Handout the materials to the groups, have the director of the prairie review the rules and talk briefly about the things students may find within a prairie. 2. Explain the paint swatch poetry. Each group of students will receive a ring of paint swatches. The paint swatches will have fun names for students to include in their poems. Each group should write two short poems using the color swatches to help describe the colors of things they see (through making observations). Each poem should be a minimum of 5 lines. Give example of poem to students to let the students carry with them as they go out and make their observations. 3. Explain that each group will either sit or stand at their site to make observations. They may take pictures or draw pictures if they would like to attach with their poems later. 4. Send the students out and tell the students that they must stick together. 5. The students make their observations and make connections between the paint colors and what they see. 6. Students should write their poems as a group. If they complete 2 poems than they must report to the teacher (who is walking around observing the students) to approve their poems. 7. While the students are out making observations and writing their poems ask students various questions: What do you notice in the prairie that was not in the school yard? Why do you think you are finding different plants here than you did in your schoolyard? What skills are you using to make your observations? How do you think you could make the connections between the paint
    • 40 mins Procedures: Include critical thinking questions and accommodations for individual needs 1. Handout the materials to the groups, have the director of the prairie review the rules and talk briefly about the things students may find within a prairie. 2. Explain the paint swatch poetry. Each group of students will receive a ring of paint swatches. The paint swatches will have fun names for students to include in their poems. Each group should write two short poems using the color swatches to help describe the colors of things they see (through making observations). Each poem should be a minimum of 5 lines. Give example of poem to students to let the students carry with them as they go out and make their observations. 3. Explain that each group will either sit or stand at their site to make observations. They may take pictures or draw pictures if they would like to attach with their poems later. 4. Send the students out and tell the students that they must stick together. 5. The students make their observations and make connections between the paint colors and what they see. 6. Students should write their poems as a group. If they complete 2 poems than they must report to the teacher (who is walking around observing the students) to approve their poems. 7. While the students are out making observations and writing their poems ask students various questions: What do you notice in the prairie that was not in the school yard? Why do you think you are finding different plants here than you did in your schoolyard? What skills are you using to make your observations? How do you think you could make the connections between the paint swatches and the things you see in the prairie? 8. The students will have 25 minutes to make observations and write their poems. 9. Gather students from the prairie area and meet in the open space. 10. Allow the students to share their poems with the class (share up to 10 poems). Students may show their paint colors as they read the poem. 11. After the field trip, teacher should develop the photos and hang up the poems and pictures in the classroom. Accommodation: Students can bring a dictionary with them to help them when writing their poems.10 minutes Summary/Closing: Conclude by summarizing the observations found in the prairie and explain how observations are a very important part of exploring new areas. Ask the students to reflect on where else they have made observations in this unit. Student Assessment: Informal Assessment: Teacher will listen to the observations to see the type of language they are using Formal Assessment: Teacher will grade the poems based off of effort and completion. √+ 2 poems are complete and shows that the students made
    • Literacy: The students in this lesson will demonstrate literacy abilities by incorporating speaking and writingskills. The students first are required to talk to their peers about what they observe in the prairie and makeconnections then to the paint swatches they are given. The students must write in a short poem about somethingthey see and incorporate the color(s) in the poem as well. Students will have precious experience writingpoems. The students will need to use content and basic language in the poem to create flowingphrases/sentences. The poems must be proofread and grammatically correct. Also, the students are allowed toinclude a picture/photo or drawing that correlates with their poem.Differentiation: Students will be working in mixed groups not based on ability level during this lesson. ELLs will be putin groups with students who excel in literacy, which will help the ELL students who may need more guidance inwriting the poem. ELLs who have trouble writing will be allowed to orally ask the teacher their questionsduring their observation time. All students will also have the option of having a dictionary with them as well tohelp them with their spelling and correct word usage. If there are students with disabilities that impair them tosee then there will be raised photos for them to describe (line, texture, etc.). Students will be asked to worktogether. Students will be encouraged to look at and utilize the strengths of their group members, in order for itto function at its highest potential. Every group will be required to fulfill the requirements of the assignmentunless individually told otherwise.