Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Williams' Basic Nutrition & Diet
Therapy
Chapter 8
Minerals
Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All ...
Lesson 8.1: Nature of
Body Minerals
1. The human body requires a variety of minerals to
perform numerous metabolic tasks.
...
Nature of Body Minerals (p. 128)
 Building blocks of life
 Hydrogen
 Carbon
 Nitrogen
 Oxygen
 25 elements also are ...
Classes of Body Minerals
(p. 128)
 Classes of body minerals
 Major minerals: recommended intake of more than 100
mg/day
...
Classes of Body Minerals
(p. 129)
5Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Functions of Minerals (p. 129)
 Functions of minerals
 Building tissue
 Activating, regulating, transmitting, and contr...
Mineral Metabolism (p. 129)
 Mineral metabolism
 Digestion: minerals do not require much digestion
 Absorption: rate de...
Lesson 8.2: Major Minerals
2. A mixed diet of varied foods and adequate energy
value is the best source of the minerals ne...
Major Minerals (p. 130)
 Calcium
 Phosphorus
 Sodium
 Potassium
 Chloride
 Magnesium
 Sulfur
9Copyright © 2013 Mosb...
Calcium (p. 130)
 Functions
 Bone and tooth formation
 Blood clotting
 Muscle and nerve action
 Metabolic reactions: ...
Calcium (cont’d) (p. 130)
 Requirements: 1000 mg/day for men and
women 19 to 50
 Deficiency states
 Osteoporosis
 Toxi...
Calcium (cont’d) (p. 131)
12Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Case Study
 Mrs. K is a 62-year-old white female who is 62 inches
tall and weighs 110 lbs. Her recent bone density test
w...
Case Study (cont’d)
 Would you say that Mrs. K. is at risk for
osteoporosis? Why or why not?
 Review the radiological im...
Phosphorus (p. 132)
 Functions
 Bone and tooth formation
 Energy metabolism: oxidation of carbohydrate, fat,
and protei...
Phosphorus (cont’d) (p. 133)
 Requirements: 700 mg/day
 Deficiency states: hypophosphatemia
 Toxicity symptoms
 Food s...
Case Study (cont’d)
 What role does phosphorus play in bone formation?
 What recommendations should be made to Mrs. K.?
...
Sodium (p. 135)
 Functions
 Water balance
 Muscle action
 Nutrient absorption
18Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an impri...
Sodium (cont’d) (p. 136)
 Requirements
 AI: 1.5 g/day
 UL: 2.3 g/day
 Deficiency states: hyponatremia
 Toxicity sympt...
Potassium (p. 137)
 Functions
 Water balance
 Metabolic reactions
• Energy production
• Conversion of blood glucose to ...
Potassium (cont’d) (p. 137)
 Requirements: AI: 4.7 g/day
 Deficiency states: hypokalemia
 Toxicity symptoms: hyperkalem...
Chloride (p. 138)
 Functions
 Digestion: component of hydrochloric acid
 Respiration: chloride shift
22Copyright © 2013...
Chloride (cont’d) (p. 138)
 Requirements: AI: 2.3 g/day
 Deficiency states: through vomiting
 Toxicity symptoms: from s...
Magnesium (p. 139)
 Functions
 General metabolism: necessary catalyst for ~300+
reactions in cells
 Protein synthesis: ...
Magnesium (cont’d) (p. 139)
 Requirements: ~300 to 400 mg/day
 Deficiency states: hypomagnesemia, rare
with balanced die...
Sulfur (p. 140)
 Functions
 Hair, skin, nails
 General metabolic functions
 High-energy bond
 Transfer energy
 Vitam...
Sulfur (cont’d) (p. 140)
 Requirements: not stated, obtained through
amino acids methionine and cysteine
 Deficiency sta...
Lesson 8.3: Trace Minerals
4. A mixed diet of varied foods and adequate energy
value is the best source of the minerals ne...
Trace Minerals (p. 140)
 Iron
 Iodine
 Zinc
 Selenium
 Fluoride
 Copper
 Manganese
 Chromium
 Molybdenum
 Other ...
Iron (p. 140)
 Functions
 Hemoglobin synthesis
 General metabolism:
• Proper glucose metabolism
• Antibody production
•...
Iron (cont’d) (p. 140)
 Requirements
 8 to 11 mg/day for males
 8 to 18 mg/day for females
 Deficiency states: anemia
...
Iodine (p. 144)
 Functions: participation in thyroid gland’s synthesis of
thyroxine
 Requirements: 150 mcg/day
32Copyrig...
Iodine (cont’d) (p. 145)
33Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Iodine (cont’d) (p. 144)
 Functions: participation in thyroid gland’s synthesis of
thyroxine
 Requirements: 150 mcg/day
...
Iodine (cont’d) (p. 145)
 Deficiency states
 Goiter
 Cretinism
 Hypothyroidism
 Hyperthyroidism
 Toxicity symptoms
...
Zinc (p. 146)
 Functions
 Enzyme constituent
 Immune system
 Other functions
 Requirements
 11 mg/day for males
 8 ...
Zinc (cont’d) (p. 147)
 Deficiency states
 Poor wound healing
 Impaired taste and smell
 Toxicity symptoms
 Food sour...
Selenium (p. 148)
 Functions
 Aids in protection from free radicals
 Requirements
 RDA: 55 mcg/day
 Deficiency states...
Fluoride, Copper, Manganese
(p. 149)
 Fluoride
 Functions by preventing dental caries
 Exceeding UL may cause fluorosis...
Chromium, Molybdenum, Other
Essential Trace Minerals (p. 150)
 Chromium
 Previously thought to reduce insulin resistance...
Mineral Supplementation (p. 151)
 Life cycle needs
 Pregnancy and lactation: for both fetus and
mother
 Adolescence: ra...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Chapter 008

286

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
286
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • What are the four fundamental elements that make up most living matter? (Hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen)
  • Ask students to name a major or trace mineral.
  • Explain that unlike carbohydrates, proteins, and fat, minerals do not require a great deal of mechanical or chemical digestion before absorption.
  • What are two of the key players in water balance? (Sodium and potassium)
  • Explain the role of thyroid-stimulating hormone in controlling the update of iodine from the blood.
  • Review the list of major minerals with students.
  • What factors determine the absorption of dietary calcium? (The food form, the interaction of three hormones that directly control absorption, and indirect metabolic stimuli from the estrogen hormones)Where can most of the body’s calcium be found? (Bones and teeth)Explain that calcium in the bones acts as a pool for calcium that can then be used to maintain blood calcium levels.Calcium is essential for muscle contraction.
  • What factors determine the absorption of dietary calcium? (The food form, the interaction of three hormones that directly control absorption, and indirect metabolic stimuli from the estrogen hormones)
  • Left side: normal, healthy boneRight side: osteoporotic boneWhich bone looks easier to break?
  • Case Study:Mrs. K is a 62-year-old white female who is 62 inches tall and weighs 110 lbs. Her recent bone density test was borderline. She doesn’t care for milk but does like yogurts, cheese, and green leafy vegetables. She tries to walk between 1 to 2 miles most days of the week.
  • Case Study:The most common calcium-related clinical issue today is osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is an abnormal decrease in bone density, especially in postmenopausal women, characterized by reduced bone mass, increased bone fragility, and a greater risk for developing bone fractures. Such bone fractures are becoming more common in elderly men as well. Each year in the United States more than 1.5 million bone fractures and 17 to 20 billion dollars in health care cost are linked to osteoporosis.Osteoporosis is not a primary calcium deficiency disease as such, but it results from a combination of factors that create chronic calcium deficiency. These factors include (1) inadequate calcium intake; (2) poor intestinal calcium absorption related to deviations in the amounts of hormones that control calcium absorption and metabolism; and (3) a lack of physical activity, which stimulates muscle insertion into bones and significantly influences bone strength, shape, and mass. Unfortunately, bone resorption often exceeds bone formation in postmenopausal women and in aging men. The interaction of factors in osteoporosis that result in bone calcium resorption outpacing bone calcium deposition are not fully understood.
  • What other mineral is essential for bone and tooth formation? (Calcium)DNA has phosphorous in its backbone.
  • If a phosphorus deficiency does develop, what are the characteristics? (Weakness, loss of appetite, fatigue, pain)Is it difficult for most Americans to meet the requirement for phosphorus?
  • Case Study:Calcification of bone depends on deposition of hydroxyapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2] by osteoblast in bone’s collagen matrix. The ratio of calcium to phosphorus in typical bone is approximately 1.5:1 by weight.The established RDAs in the DRI guidelines for both men and women aged 19 years and older is 700 mg/day.High-protein foods are particularly rich in phosphorus, so milk and milk products, meat, fish, and eggs are the primary sources of phosphorus in the average diet. The bioavailability of phosphorus from plant seeds (e.g., cereal grains, beans, peas, other legumes, and nuts) is much lower because they contain phytic acid, which is a storage form of phosphorus in seeds that humans cannot directly digest. Dietary recommendations as to which foods are good sources of phosphorus should be discussed with Mrs. K.
  • What is the main function of sodium? (Water balance)Explain that sodium is needed for glucose to be absorbed.
  • Excess sodium can lead to what chronic disease? (Hypertension)What is the main dietary source of sodium? (Table salt)
  • Explain that sodium and potassium work with each other to maintain water balance. Mention that sodium is extracellular and potassium is intracellular.Does potassium raise or lower blood pressure?
  • When are potassium deficiencies more likely to occur? (During clinical situations such as prolonged vomiting or diarrhea, during use of diuretic drugs, during use of hypertension drugs, as a result of severe malnutrition, or after surgery)What is the result of extremely high potassium levels? (Fatal arrhythmia)
  • Emphasize that chloride is needed for digestion of all foods through hydrochloric acid.
  • What is the primary reason for chloride deficiency? (Excessive fluid losses through vomiting, which leads to metabolic alkalosis)The only known development of toxicity is through dehydration.
  • Where in the body is magnesium found? (In all body cells; it has widespread metabolic functions.)Review what a catalyst is. Why are catalysts important?Discuss basal metabolic rate and how magnesium deficiency could influence it.
  • What are some of the deficiency symptoms? (Muscle weakness and cramps, hypertension, and blood vessel constriction in the heart and brain)Which individuals are at greater risk for developing magnesium toxicity? (Those with renal insufficiency)Which sources are relatively poor sources of magnesium? (Most fruits, except bananas; milk; meat; and fish)
  • Where is collagen found and what is its function? (It is a connective tissue found in the gums and joints.)
  • Because sulfur is obtained through amino acids, many of its functions are the same as protein (e.g., maintenance of hair and nails and collagen formation).What are other food sources that contain protein, and thus sulfur-containing amino acids?Are methionine and cysteine essential or nonessential amino acids?
  • The recommended intake for trace minerals is less than 100 mg/day.
  • 70% of the body’s iron occurs where? (In red blood cells)Iron is best known for its role in hemoglobin and therefore its essentiality in oxygen transport.
  • What is one clinical test to determine iron-deficiency anemia? (Hemoglobin levels, hematocrit)Why do women need more iron than men? (Menses)Explain that hemochromatosis is a genetic condition enabling the body to retain more iron than needed.Discuss the signs and symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia.Explain that heme iron is only found in animal products, whereas nonheme iron is found in animal and plant products.Nonheme iron is more tightly bound than heme iron.
  • What is the function of thyroxine? (Regulates metabolic rate)
  • Guide students through the diagram, explaining that iodine is needed in the regulation gene expression.
  • Ask students to identify the location of the thyroid gland.
  • What is the difference between hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism?Cretinism results from a mother consuming insufficient amounts of iodine during fetal development.
  • Zinc is especially important during what growth periods? (Pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence)Who reported the lowest zinc intake on the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey? (Children aged 1 to 3 years, adolescent girls, and persons older than 71 years)
  • TALKING POINTS:Zinc supplements often are supplied to patients with open wounds.
  • Selenium functions with specific proteins as an essential part of an antioxidant enzyme, glutathione peroxidase, which protects cells and their lipid membranes from oxidative damage. It also functions as a part of the protein center of teeth and participates in the regulation of thyroid hormone action and vitamin C activity.A mild selenium deficiency can have what effect? (It may decrease a person’s ability to fight infection. Severe deficiency may put individuals at risk for certain types of cancer.)
  • Explain why copper is called the “iron twin.” (They have many of the same functions.)Manganese toxicity can result from mining.
  • A recent clinical trial showed no effect with chromium supplementation and reduced insulin resistance.Molybdenum is needed in minute amounts.
  • Special needs during growth periods and in clinical situations may require individual supplements of specific major minerals or trace elements.Ask students to name five high-risk groups that may need to supplement their diet and explain why. (Adolescent girls on poor diets, low-income adolescent boys, athletes, vegetarians, and elderly persons on poor diets)
  • Transcript of "Chapter 008"

    1. 1. Williams' Basic Nutrition & Diet Therapy Chapter 8 Minerals Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1 14th Edition
    2. 2. Lesson 8.1: Nature of Body Minerals 1. The human body requires a variety of minerals to perform numerous metabolic tasks. 2Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    3. 3. Nature of Body Minerals (p. 128)  Building blocks of life  Hydrogen  Carbon  Nitrogen  Oxygen  25 elements also are essential to human life 3Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    4. 4. Classes of Body Minerals (p. 128)  Classes of body minerals  Major minerals: recommended intake of more than 100 mg/day • Calcium • Phosphorus • Sodium • Potassium • Magnesium • Chloride • Sulfur  Trace minerals • 18 elements • Recommended intake of less than 100 mg/day 4Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    5. 5. Classes of Body Minerals (p. 129) 5Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    6. 6. Functions of Minerals (p. 129)  Functions of minerals  Building tissue  Activating, regulating, transmitting, and controlling metabolic processes 6Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    7. 7. Mineral Metabolism (p. 129)  Mineral metabolism  Digestion: minerals do not require much digestion  Absorption: rate determined by food form, body need, tissue health  Transport: enter through portal circulation, bound to proteins  Tissue uptake: controlled by hormones, excess excreted in urine  Occurrence in the body: basic forms are free ions and covalently bound 7Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    8. 8. Lesson 8.2: Major Minerals 2. A mixed diet of varied foods and adequate energy value is the best source of the minerals necessary for health. 3. Of the total amount of minerals a person consumes, only a relatively limited amount is available to the body. 8Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    9. 9. Major Minerals (p. 130)  Calcium  Phosphorus  Sodium  Potassium  Chloride  Magnesium  Sulfur 9Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    10. 10. Calcium (p. 130)  Functions  Bone and tooth formation  Blood clotting  Muscle and nerve action  Metabolic reactions: absorption of B12, activation of pancreatic lipase, secretion of insulin, cell membrane permeability 10Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    11. 11. Calcium (cont’d) (p. 130)  Requirements: 1000 mg/day for men and women 19 to 50  Deficiency states  Osteoporosis  Toxicity symptoms: hypercalcemia  Food sources  Milk is the major food source  Green vegetables, fish with bones, fortified food 11Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    12. 12. Calcium (cont’d) (p. 131) 12Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    13. 13. Case Study  Mrs. K is a 62-year-old white female who is 62 inches tall and weighs 110 lbs. Her recent bone density test was borderline. She doesn’t care for milk but does like yogurts, cheese, and green leafy vegetables. She tries to walk between 1 to 2 miles most days of the week. 13Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    14. 14. Case Study (cont’d)  Would you say that Mrs. K. is at risk for osteoporosis? Why or why not?  Review the radiological image on slide 12 14Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    15. 15. Phosphorus (p. 132)  Functions  Bone and tooth formation  Energy metabolism: oxidation of carbohydrate, fat, and protein; protein construction; cell function; genetic inheritance  Acid–base balance 15Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    16. 16. Phosphorus (cont’d) (p. 133)  Requirements: 700 mg/day  Deficiency states: hypophosphatemia  Toxicity symptoms  Food sources  Milk, milk products, fish, eggs 16Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    17. 17. Case Study (cont’d)  What role does phosphorus play in bone formation?  What recommendations should be made to Mrs. K.? 17Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    18. 18. Sodium (p. 135)  Functions  Water balance  Muscle action  Nutrient absorption 18Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    19. 19. Sodium (cont’d) (p. 136)  Requirements  AI: 1.5 g/day  UL: 2.3 g/day  Deficiency states: hyponatremia  Toxicity symptoms: salt sensitivity and hypertension, hypernatremia  Food sources  Table salt, cured meat, canned soups, processed food 19Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    20. 20. Potassium (p. 137)  Functions  Water balance  Metabolic reactions • Energy production • Conversion of blood glucose to glycogen • Synthesis of muscle protein  Muscle action  Insulin release  Blood pressure: role in hypertension 20Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    21. 21. Potassium (cont’d) (p. 137)  Requirements: AI: 4.7 g/day  Deficiency states: hypokalemia  Toxicity symptoms: hyperkalemia  Food sources  Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fresh meats 21Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    22. 22. Chloride (p. 138)  Functions  Digestion: component of hydrochloric acid  Respiration: chloride shift 22Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    23. 23. Chloride (cont’d) (p. 138)  Requirements: AI: 2.3 g/day  Deficiency states: through vomiting  Toxicity symptoms: from severe dehydration  Food sources: table salt 23Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    24. 24. Magnesium (p. 139)  Functions  General metabolism: necessary catalyst for ~300+ reactions in cells  Protein synthesis: activates amino acids, role in synthesis and maintenance of DNA  Muscle action  Basal metabolic rate: influences secretion of thyroxine 24Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    25. 25. Magnesium (cont’d) (p. 139)  Requirements: ~300 to 400 mg/day  Deficiency states: hypomagnesemia, rare with balanced diet  Toxicity symptoms: excessive supplements may produce GI symptoms  Food sources  Nuts, soybeans, cocoa, seafood, peas, green vegetables 25Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    26. 26. Sulfur (p. 140)  Functions  Hair, skin, nails  General metabolic functions  High-energy bond  Transfer energy  Vitamin structure: component of thiamin and biotin  Collagen structure 26Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    27. 27. Sulfur (cont’d) (p. 140)  Requirements: not stated, obtained through amino acids methionine and cysteine  Deficiency states: not reported  Toxicity symptoms: unlikely  Food sources: animal proteins  Meat, nuts, soy, fish, cheese, eggs 27Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    28. 28. Lesson 8.3: Trace Minerals 4. A mixed diet of varied foods and adequate energy value is the best source of the minerals necessary for health. 5. Of the total amount of minerals a person consumes, only a relatively limited amount is available to the body. 28Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    29. 29. Trace Minerals (p. 140)  Iron  Iodine  Zinc  Selenium  Fluoride  Copper  Manganese  Chromium  Molybdenum  Other essential trace minerals 29Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    30. 30. Iron (p. 140)  Functions  Hemoglobin synthesis  General metabolism: • Proper glucose metabolism • Antibody production • Drug detoxification in the liver • Collagen and purine synthesis • Conversion of carotene to vitamin A 30Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    31. 31. Iron (cont’d) (p. 140)  Requirements  8 to 11 mg/day for males  8 to 18 mg/day for females  Deficiency states: anemia  Toxicity symptoms  Overdose from supplements  Hemochromatosis  Food sources  Heme  Nonheme 31Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    32. 32. Iodine (p. 144)  Functions: participation in thyroid gland’s synthesis of thyroxine  Requirements: 150 mcg/day 32Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    33. 33. Iodine (cont’d) (p. 145) 33Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    34. 34. Iodine (cont’d) (p. 144)  Functions: participation in thyroid gland’s synthesis of thyroxine  Requirements: 150 mcg/day 34Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    35. 35. Iodine (cont’d) (p. 145)  Deficiency states  Goiter  Cretinism  Hypothyroidism  Hyperthyroidism  Toxicity symptoms  Food sources  Iodized table salt, seafood; depends on soil content 35Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    36. 36. Zinc (p. 146)  Functions  Enzyme constituent  Immune system  Other functions  Requirements  11 mg/day for males  8 mg/day for females 36Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    37. 37. Zinc (cont’d) (p. 147)  Deficiency states  Poor wound healing  Impaired taste and smell  Toxicity symptoms  Food sources  Meat, seafood, legumes, whole grains 37Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    38. 38. Selenium (p. 148)  Functions  Aids in protection from free radicals  Requirements  RDA: 55 mcg/day  Deficiency states  Toxicity symptoms  Food sources  Seafood, kidney, liver; depends on soil content 38Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    39. 39. Fluoride, Copper, Manganese (p. 149)  Fluoride  Functions by preventing dental caries  Exceeding UL may cause fluorosis  Copper  “Iron twin”  Manganese  Inhalation toxicity 39Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    40. 40. Chromium, Molybdenum, Other Essential Trace Minerals (p. 150)  Chromium  Previously thought to reduce insulin resistance  Molybdenum  Inadequate dietary intake improbable  Other essential trace minerals  Aluminum, arsenic, boron, nickel, silicon, tin, vanadium 40Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    41. 41. Mineral Supplementation (p. 151)  Life cycle needs  Pregnancy and lactation: for both fetus and mother  Adolescence: rapid bone growth  Adulthood: postmenopausal women  Clinical needs  Iron-deficiency anemia  Zinc deficiency Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc., an imprint of Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×