Facilities Realignment Report
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    Facilities Realignment Report Facilities Realignment Report Presentation Transcript

    • Sibley East Facilities, Realignment, Restructuring Report Presented By: Mari Lu Martens, Steve Harter and Jim Amsden With special thanks to Staff Facilities Committee that has helped gather information contained in the report.
    • Preparing for the Future
    • Sibley East Schools Mission Statement Sibley East Schools maximize the use of  community resources to prepare today's students to meet tomorrow's challenges. Staffing & Program Offerings K-12   School Facilities and Instruction  Research Based Grade Alignments
    • Staffing and Program Offerings
    • Staffing and Program Offerings  Staffing Grades K-6 623 Students  62 licensed faculty   32 classroom teachers  Specialists Special Education   ESL  LD  Music  shared EBD with H.S.  Art and J.H.  Media  Autism  P.E.  Speech  Title I&II  DCD  Dean  ECSE  Gifted/Talented  School Social Worker  Test Coordinator
    • Staffing and Program Offerings Staffing Grades 7-9  Staffing is based on four section scheduling for  262 students.  Students are serviced by:  16 teachers with full junior high teaching assignments *2 of these teach overloads  7 teachers with split junior high and senior high teaching assignments (all travel)  2 teachers with split junior high and elementary teaching assignments
    • Staffing and Program Offerings Staffing Grades 10-12   Staffing is based on four section scheduling for 296 students and an eight period day.  Students are serviced by:  14 teachers with full senior high teaching assignments *2 of these teach overloads  1 full time senior high counselor  7 teachers with split junior high and senior high teaching assignments  3 teachers with split senior high and elementary teaching assignments
    • Staffing and Program Offerings Program Offerings EC-Grade 6 classrooms  After School Programs  Targeted Services  Integration School  Embedded Programs  Cadets  Title Programs  ESL  Music and Art 1 semester each  P. E.  Keybo for 5th and 6th grade  Band for 5th and 6th grade  Media 
    • Staffing and Program Offerings Program Offerings 7-9   Students acquire 7th and 8th grade credits; these credits will determine if the student moves onto the graduation track.  9th grade students acquire 7-8 credits towards graduation.  Additional programming: Advisor/Advisee, peer tutor, targeted services after school and extra-curriculars
    • Staffing and Program Offerings Program Offerings 10-12  Students acquire 5.5 core credits in 9th grade and 1.5-2.5 electives  Students required to take 12 core credits for graduation   English (3)  Math (2)  Science (2)  Social Studies (3)  Fine Arts (1)  Physical Education (1) Students are required to take 9 elective credits for graduation   There are 71 different classes covering 63 separate subjects offered to fulfill these credits
    • College Credits Avail. Elective Classes r Se Programming 10-12 h ut m Yo alis n ur Jo CS i. FA . Sc p m c. Co du E s. B u ec h T d. re In ultu ri c Ag age u ng La rts A e Fin d. E y. Ph h at M ce s ien ie Sc tud S c. So h s gli En 12 10 8 6 4 2 0
    • Programming 1957 vs 2009 1957 Classes: 22 subjects taught Bookkeeping Algebra Business Geometry Typing General math Shorthand Biology English General Science Latin Physics Spelling World History Speech American History Geography Agriculture Industrial Arts Home Economics Band Choir
    • 2009 Classes: 63 subjects taught English Algebra Agriscience Child Dev Draw/Paint Honors English Geometry Horticulture Careers in CD Mixed Media World History Triginometry Animal mgmt Basic Foods Ceramics World Geography Analysis Wildlife Mgmt Creative Foods Economics College Calculus Landscape Hort Foreign Foods U.S. Government Vet Science Business Law Family Living Psychology Carpentry Accounting I-II Living On Own Sociology Interior Trade Marketing Journalism Biology Appl. Electricity Business Appl. Adv. Phy Ed. Chemistry Drafting/CAD Desktop Pub ESL Basic Physics Cabinet making Comp Sys/Prog Spanish I-IV Physics Metals Manufact. Adv Program Band Anatomy Metals/Welding Intro to HTML Choir Env. Science Small Engines A+ Certif Phy Ed Forensics Landscape Video Prod I-IV Special Ed
    • Sibley East Facilities
    • Facilities: The Arlington Site 1957 Yearbook Photo The construction of the new Arlington-Green Isle school began on July 27th, 1955. The opening of the 1956-57 school year was delayed for one week. Fourteen new classrooms were added, including rooms for home economics, industrial arts, agriculture, science, lecture and laboratory rooms, typing and bookkeeping rooms. A new library and new administrative offices are in the building. The old gym was converted into a hot lunch room, with a kitchen having all the latest facilities......................
    • Facilities: Arlington Site High School Elementary Programming additions to Programming additions to   the high school since 1957 the elementary since 1933.  All Day Kindergarten  Special Education Learning Disabilities  Computer Lab Added Emotional Behavioral  Special Ed Classroom Disabilities  Title One Classroom ESL   ESL Classroom Computer labs (2)  ITV instruction   Social Worker Counseling Area   School Psychologist Girls Athletics   Cadets Community Education 
    • Structural Facilities: Arlington Site Elementary High School High school structure is relatively The Elementary School structure is   relatively unchanged from 1933 with unchanged from 1957. the exception of added temps. Energy updates Energy Updates  (windows/lighting/ventilation) Temporary classrooms added  Pool and Fine Arts wing added Kindergarten  Classroom spaces changed  Early childhood education Two classrooms converted to  Classroom spaces changed computer labs  One storage area now a classroom Computer Lab added   (ESL) Special Ed Classroom  Title One Classroom Staff work area reduced to   accommodate handicapped ESL Classroom  accessibility Social Worker  School Psychologist Shared services to social worker,   Speech psychologist, speech 
    • Teaching and Support Area Sizes Compared to State Guidelines (MDE Guidelines January, 2003)
    • Arlington Site: Teaching and Support Area Sizes Compared to State Guidelines Existing State Guideline Difference (High School) General Classrooms 704 sq. ft (average) 850-950 sq. ft -146 sq. ft. TO -246 sq. ft. Science Lab/Classroom 924 sq. ft. 1,200-1,500 sq. ft -276 sq. ft. TO -576 sq. ft. Media Center 2112 sq. ft 7700 – 9100 sq. ft. -5588 sq. ft. TO - 6988 sq, ft. Cafeteria/Kitchen/Prep 4376 sq. ft 9250 sq. feet. -4874 sq. ft. Art Classroom 1100 sq. ft. 1950 – 2450 sq. ft. -850 sq. ft. TO – 1350 sq. ft. Band 1792 sq. ft. 3260 – 4930 sq. ft. -1468 sq. ft. TO – 3138 sq. ft. Choir 1344 sq. ft. 1910 - 2880 sq. ft. -566 sq. ft TO – 1536 sq. ft. Technical Education 1888 – 1989 sq. ft. 2000 – 3000 sq. ft. -122 sq.. Ft. TO -1111 sq.. ft Administration/ 2156 sq. ft. 4670 sq ft -2514 sq. ft Counseling/ Health Services Weight Room/Fitness 4508 sq. ft. 2000 – 4000 sq. ft. +2508 TO +508 FACS Lab/Classroom 968 1200 – 1500 sq. ft. -232 sq. ft TO -532 sq. ft.
    • Gaylord Site: Teaching and Support Area Sizes Compared to State Guidelines Existing State Guideline Difference Middle School General Classrooms 728 sq. ft (average) 850-950 sq. ft -122sq. ft. TO -222 sq. ft. Science Lab/Classroom 1060 sq. ft. 1,500-1,700 sq. ft -440 sq. ft. TO -640 sq. ft. Media Center 2376 sq. ft 4150 - 4850 sq. ft. -1774 sq, ft. TO -2474 sq. ft. Cafeteria/Kitchen/Prep 3600 sq. ft 9250 sq. feet. -5650 sq. ft. Art Classroom 990 sq. ft 1250 – 1750 sq. ft. -350 sq. ft. TO -760 sq. ft Band 2142 sq. ft. 2100 – 3500 sq. ft. +42 sq. ft TO -1358 sq. ft. Choir 2970 sq. ft. 1600 – 2200 sq. ft. +1370 sq. ft TO +770 sq. ft. Administration/ 2156 sq. ft. 4670 sq ft -2514 sq. ft. Counseling/ Health Services Weight Room/Fitness 1188 sq. Ft. 2000 sq. ft. -812 sq. ft. FACS Lab/Classroom 1100 sq. ft 1200 – 1500 sq. ft. -100 sq. ft TO -400 sq. ft
    • Restructure/Realignment K-6, 7-12
    • Research Findings on Grade Alignment Support of K-8 programming As grade span configuration increases, so does student achievement.   The more transitions a student makes, the worse the student performs Eighth graders learning in an elementary setting (K-8, K-9, and 3-8)  outperformed eighth graders in other configurations The K-8 advantage is attributed to fewer student transitions, differences  between student populations at K-8 vs. middle schools, and differences in teacher populations The relative protective elementary school setting made entry into adolescence  less stressful for both boys and girls and academic achievement improved.
    • Research Findings on Grade Alignment Support of K-6 /7-12 programming Students who made the transition to high school in  grade 7, as opposed to later, drop out less often  Drop out rates were highest amongst students making the transition in the 10th grade year
    • Restructure/Realignment K-6, 7-12 Pros (K-6 Staff) Cons (K-6 Staff) ELL students less likely to drop out – Playground space   grade level bands Space for cadet program  Less traveling teachers  Bussing routes get longer, possible  Expand curriculum  loss of student enrollment No shifting of students  Accessibility to student tutors  Streamline materials/supplies  Costs of student travel  Eliminate duplicity  Lack of office space for specialists  Streamline administration  Balanced classrooms  Gender, size, diversity Increase collaboration-student and  teacher Building consistency  Better accessibility to specialists 
    • Restructure/Realignment K-6, 7-12 Pros (7-12 Staff) Cons (7-12 Staff) 7th and 8th grade students with senior Collaborative teaching opportunities   high Junior and senior high students can be  part of the same organizations Science lab is not adequate for 7-12  population demands No teacher travel  Space issues for physical education  Recovering credits more streamlined  instruction Expanded curricular opportunities  Classrooms are significantly undersized  Similar support services student  in the elementary portions of the programming for 7-12 buildings Fewer transitions for students  Library/Media Center space is  Eliminate lost instructional time from  significantly limited for 7-12 teacher travel Computer lab access would be limited  Improved scheduling options  in a 7-12 use configuration Student lunch areas are undersized 
    • Grade Alignment Conclusions The segregation of adolescents in middle-grade schools does not  necessarily translate into higher achievement. Available evidence suggests the opposite. Where grade fragmentation is a reality, steps should be taken to  lessen the adverse effects on students of school-to-school transitions. Neither facility will support the optimum K-8/9-12  configuration based on space constraints. Significant remodeling/upgrades would be necessary at both  sites to support a K-6/7-12 configuration (As detailed in the Teaching and Support Areas MDE recommendations).
    • Grade Realignment Factors to consider  Cost and length of student travel  A possible decrease or increase in parental involvement,  possibly effected by the distance to school and the number of schools a family’s children attend The effect of school setting on achievement  The number of school transitions for students  The opportunities for interactions between age groups  The influence of older students on younger students  The number of students at each grade level, which may effect  class groupings and course offerings
    • Strategic Plan Findings
    • Strategic Plan Findings The District Strategic Plan calls for:  Conduct recommissioning assessment  School Facilities are aging   Arlington Site average age is 46.0  Gaylord Site average age is 46.46  Minnesota average is 30.00 (ESG Report)  Total cost for infrastructure upgrades to meet current ventilation requirements, improve indoor air quality, upgrade the electrical service and replace/upgrade electrical distribution panels, and obtain a 30 year system to serve the facility would be approximately $6,165,000 at the Arlington site and $7,077,000 at the Gaylord site.  $13,242,00.00 before any classroom changes (Hallberg Engineering Recommission Study June 27, 2008)
    • Strategic Plan Findings The District Strategic Plan calls for:  Appoint facility task force to review building’s short  and long term needs. MDE Teaching and Support Spaces were reviewed   Current facilities are limiting some programming in the areas of science, technology education, and industrial technology lab spaces.  Current spaces/facilities limit 2009 curriculum and instruction techniques that are geared toward collaboration, information sharing, and learning by doing District staff and board members have made site visits to LSH, Waconia,  Waterville, and BellePlaine schools to see updated facilities and student spaces.
    • Strategic Plan Findings The District Strategic Plan calls for:  Appoint a committee and gather information to review grade level  realignment at each campus.  Research supports a K-8/9-12 alignment or a K-2/3-8/9-12.  Fewer transitions increases student achievement  Eighth graders learning in an elementary setting (K-8, K-9, and 3-8) outperformed eighth graders in other configurations A K-6/7-12 would be the secondary option   Students who made the transition to high school in grade 7, as opposed to later, drop out less often
    • Conclusions of Report District leaders must take a holistic approach to  programming, grade level alignment and facilities. Each of these is interdependent on the other, and can support or limit options  available to district residents. Current facilities are nearing their limits given increased programming,  curriculum, and service requirements Community and school board members must determine how we move forward in  preparing our students for the 21st century. Backward plan   Identify programs (science, technical and computer education, collaboration, information sharing, learning by doing, meet identified state standards)  Identify most effective grade level alignment (K-8, 9-12 / 7-12 / K-12)  Identify facility needs (EGS, Hallberg Engineering, Site visits)