Great places ferryville presentation 6 28-10
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  • presented by Laura Brown University of Wisconsin-Extension June 28, 2010 Village of Ferryville
  • Bring – laptop screen, projector, markers, flipchart Set up groundrules: Show respect for one another Listen to understand Focus on agenda topics and timelines Give others the opportunity to contribute Areas to be covered: Discuss what tourism is and overall impact of tourism Discuss current tourism projects and programs Next steps- potential strategies for Ferryville based on research and First Impressions
  • Soldiers Grove Art Festival Tractor Parade County Fair Bald Eagle Day.  I am sending one of the Governor Lucey Historical Marker tractor pull on Market in the Park at Sugar Creek Park
  • When considering Tourism, it is important to consider what local residents think. In the survey residents expressed support for tourism related activities- more than 70 % supported the development of hiking and walking trails on public land. Surprisingly, silent sports were supported by the greatest percentage of respondents. This information has helped to inform the county tourism council to develop a strategy that is most appropriate for Crawford County. But residents also value the things that drive Crawford County’s tourism industry: unique natural beauty and open spaces.
  • You will notice that I have not included any mention of “tax base”. That’s simply a bias of mine. I see tax base as a bi-product of the creation of jobs, income, and wealth. And….one cannot talk about tax base without some discussion of the cost of public services. And….there are certainly examples where the addition of businesses and employers can in fact have a negative impact on tax base… The adult book store on Main Street An industry that has a negative impact on the air, water or land….i.e. the paper industry…Oscar Meyers in Madison - A business that dominates a market, pays low wages and benefits, and crowds out existing businesses that paid livable wages
  • Pulver/Shaffer Economics model…. A great way to boil down economic approaches to adding jobs and income in a community. You can review Doyle’s Build Wisconsin and categorize every strategy using this kind of typology….but its not helpful in itself in helping communities think about innovative E.D. strategies.
  • Poll question 1: Laura I’ve found in working with community groups and organizations, particularly if we’re short on time, and resources, and volunteers, its very easy to get so focused on project or goals that we forget to look at the big picture. Tourism, just like any other strategy for economic development, is part of a “web” of related activities, people, businesses, and infrastructure that contributes to our economy. I like the web metaphor because like a spider, a community really needs the multiple strands of the economy to keep the economy strong. One strand, or one strategy for economic development, is not enough So, from a tourism perspective its not enough to say we want “tourists.” That sometimes means asking some tough questions: If people come, where will they spend money ( if we open up a river for canoeing, are there places for canoeists to stay)? How will they get here? How will they find out about us ( Do we have a website?)? Would tourists consider buying a home here? How will tourism impact our communities (increase in motorcycle traffic for instance? ) On the ground this means that we may need to consider how tourism fits in or compliments other parts of our economy or economic development strategies (like downtown development!) So things like entrepreneurship, business retention, workforce development and so on should be our bugger strategy for downtown development in addition to tourism.
  • Laura Often tourism is isolated from other economic development strategies because it may create lower paying jobs that may not be the driving sectors of your economy. BUT tourism does serve as a sort of stepping stone for entry level workers and for entrepreneurs. According to the Wisconsin Department of Tourism this comprises the largest percentage of new businesses and XX % of Pros and cons of tourism Benefits to business $8.7 billion 52% from food and shopping 27% from shopping Brings in dollars from outside of the community. Larger and more diverse mix of retail. Provides new entrepreneurial opportunities for community residents. Brings customers with comparatively high disposable incomes. Increases tax revenues. Enhances the visibility of the community, increasing its attractiveness as a place to visit, work, or call home. Pros and cons of tourism Benefits to business $8.7 billion 52% from food and shopping 27% from shopping
  • Wisconsin lost 137,000 jobs during this downturn, almost 5 percent of its job base since the recession began in December 2007, on a seasonally adjusted basis. All sectors suffered job losses with the exception of health care. The manufacturing sector lost 13 percent of its jobs statewide during this recession, some 66,000 on a seasonally adjusted basis. All of the upper Midwest major manufacturing states took a beating in this business cycle. Especially hard hit were Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio, due to the collapse of the auto industry. With large manufacturing job losses in Indiana, Wisconsin became the leader in the share of its workers employed in manufacturing. Construction, which was the first industry to be affected with the housing turn that began in Wisconsin in 2006, lost 16 percent of its jobs since December 2007, and almost 20 percent since its peak in February of 2006. Professional and Business Services also lost more jobs on a percentage basis than the state average, 8.9 percent. Other sectors lost jobs as well, but were not impacted quite as severely as those above. Leisure and Hospitality, for example, lost 1.4 percent of its jobs. Employment recovery always lags economic recover. Following recessions since WWII, the economic upswings led job gains by nine to nineteen months. After the 2001 recession, it took Wisconsin twenty-six months before job numbers began to increase again on a sustained basis. It was fifty months before the state’s job levels recovered to pre-2001 recession levels. Job recovery following the current recession is expected to be slow as well. Consumers are not expected to be the driving sector in the economic recovery, as the huge destruction in home and financial equity wealth will force an increased proclivity for savings instead of consumption. The chart below is a comparison of employment change.
  • Wholesale and retail trade (26%) and manufacturing (20%) are the greatest areas of employment in Crawford County. Leisure and hospitality comprises 10% of all county jobs. Crawford County is among the state’s slowest growing counties with under two percent net population growth over the last seven years and ranking 64th fastest growing among the state’s 72 counties. Net population growth was 310 residents in this period. [1] 2.2% since 2000 compared to state growth of 5.8% The median age in Crawford County in 2000 was 38.9 year- one of the highest in the state. Population projections suggest that the population over the age of 60 will increase from 27% to 35% by 2020 and the population under 20 years of age will decline. Income levels in the region are lower than state and national levels. The average wage paid to employees in Crawford County is $22,741; 30% below the state average. In 2001 Crawford County’s per capita income was $20, 990. The jobs with the most openings (in an 8 county region that includes Crawford County) include those related to tourism such as cashiers, waiters, and retail sales persons (with an average wage of under $9.00 per hour) as well as nurses and truck drivers (with an average wage of $20 per hour or more). Crawford County currently has no schools of higher education but it served by Southwest Technical College. The Mississippi River Regional Planning Commission reports that fewer residents with higher degrees are staying in the region. [2] [1] Crawford County Workforce Profile, Department of Workforce Development [2] MRRPC 2007-2012 Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy Ch. 5 “Weaknesses and Threats”
  • Laura Tourism is one piece of our economic pie it can play a large role in the economy, especially for some rural areas in Wisconsin. This chart was created form Data from the Bureau of Workforce Development http://worknet.wisconsin.gov/worknet/ to demonstrate the diverse range of businesses that comprise a local economy (Crawford County). When we look at charts like this its important to distinguish between direct spending and indirect spending.
  • Laura Tourism is one piece of our economic pie it can play a large role in the economy, especially for some rural areas in Wisconsin. This chart was created form Data from the Bureau of Workforce Development http://worknet.wisconsin.gov/worknet/ to demonstrate the diverse range of businesses that comprise a local economy (Crawford County). When we look at charts like this its important to distinguish between direct spending and indirect spending. NOTE THAT THE Art fest started in Ferryville- but is nw in soldiers grove. This is an opportunity to partner together as a region to bring outside dollars into the region.
  • Laura Tourism is one piece of our economic pie it can play a large role in the economy, especially for some rural areas in Wisconsin. This chart was created form Data from the Bureau of Workforce Development http://worknet.wisconsin.gov/worknet/ to demonstrate the diverse range of businesses that comprise a local economy (Crawford County). When we look at charts like this its important to distinguish between direct spending and indirect spending.
  • Laura Tourism is one piece of our economic pie it can play a large role in the economy, especially for some rural areas in Wisconsin. This chart was created form Data from the Bureau of Workforce Development http://worknet.wisconsin.gov/worknet/ to demonstrate the diverse range of businesses that comprise a local economy (Crawford County). When we look at charts like this its important to distinguish between direct spending and indirect spending.
  • Laura Tourism is one piece of our economic pie it can play a large role in the economy, especially for some rural areas in Wisconsin. This chart was created form Data from the Bureau of Workforce Development http://worknet.wisconsin.gov/worknet/ to demonstrate the diverse range of businesses that comprise a local economy (Crawford County). When we look at charts like this its important to distinguish between direct spending and indirect spending.
  • These are the three legs of the tourism industry. As I show some examples, think about what area you think Ferryville may be strongest?? Where could we use some work? Come of these examples are from larger communities and communities that may be quite different from Ferryville.
  • Bill
  • How restaurants can become an institution in your community: Popeye’s was originally a 60-seat tavern, has expanded over time to seat 600. Popeye’s has been operated continuously since 1972 by the Anagnos family. Popeye’s hosts charity events, such as high school jazz band concerts, during which a portion of the day’s proceeds benefits the band. Popeye’s also hosts fundraising events for local high school sports teams, among other organizations – especially during the slow seasons. This not only keeps business going during the winter and drawing people downtown, but supports local groups.
  • Multi purpose business..
  • Growing interest in local and specialty foods- Good example of how a business can lure people in with an EXPERIENCE Give them plenty to do, and somethuing to take home to remember their visit.
  • The next two examples are business that serve not only as tourist destinations but the local community as well in the form of gathering spaces.
  • This is a particular niche that seems to be growing in our area as well
  • These are the three legs of the tourism industry. As I show some examples, think about what area you think Ferryville may be strongest?? Where could we use some work? Come of these examples are from larger communities and communities that may be quite different from Ferryville.
  • These best practices have been documented by tourism developers around the county. These are based on principles articulated in “Your Town: A Destination The 25 immutable Rules of Tourism Development” by Roger Brooks and Maury Forman. We’ve looked for examples of best practices from other communities around Wisconsin. Research: Nominations Community visits Business interviews Note that while the examples presented are from businesses many of the strategies apply to businesses of all kinds as well as communities!
  • These best practices have been documented by tourism developers around the county. These are based on principles articulated in “Your Town: A Destination The 25 immutable Rules of Tourism Development” by Roger Brooks and Maury Forman. We’ve looked for examples of best practices from other communities around Wisconsin. Fortunately Ferryville is already doing many of these things..
  • Why plan? Many people say they want things to stay the same. But things are changing! You need to have a plan if you want to know where you are going. This manual published my UMinn is a great too for starting a tourism development plan. It includes information about Why and How to create a tourism plan, how to Assessing Tourism Potential and Develop local businesses, and handle marketing and communication. What goes into a marketing plan- Developing marketing plan
  • This cycle southwest Wisconsin map is a partnership between Grant, Iowa, and Lafayette counties and shows no county borders. The website offers “Bed and Bike options and encourages tourists to take advantage of art galleries and other retail options along the routes.
  • Laura Experiencing Agriculture through the Fall Arts Tour: Have done a great job of linking communities with a similar theme- public a map and a website that makes information gathering easy.
  • Laura Tourism is your front door to your non-tourism economic development efforts. Anyone contemplating starting a new business or moving to your community will first arrive as a visitor. This means communities need to recognize how they are perceived by visitors to their community. My colleague Andy Lewis at the Center for Community and Economic Development created the first impressions program to help communities better understand how they are perceived by visitors. Secret shopper concept Includes physical aspects of the downtown customer service and aspects of the community as a whole like social services and education Website for you to download the free tools and read more
  • Laura The First impressions program is a tool you might use with the board of your organization of key leaders in the community But some communities have recognized that the folks you meet at the bar, the local residents, are really ambassadors of your community too- for better or worse! Monroe County developed a hospitality training that has been used not just with tourism organizations with many different types of community and volunteer organizations, like Rotary and Lions clubs.
  • Bill Things that make your community unique may your history, a diverse range of artists that live there, or natural resources that make your community or downtown unique. Examples: Galena, Lanesboro,
  • Or improving circulation The Ferryville boat landing is a great first step toward capitalizing on your uniqueness here on the river.
  • Laura Green County in southwestern Wisconsin‘ - famous for Swiss heritage and ethnic cuisine, colorful festivals, and tasty local brews perfectly paired with award-winning cheese. This isnt just about tourism but is apparent the County’s logo, displayed on the government website! The community has really embraced this uniqueness to create a sense of place The community of new Glarus, that bill will describe is also part of Green County
  • Creating appealing places with appealing experiences Good community planning and place-making- considering things like land development patterns, creating attractive areas, preserving natural resources, and creating attractive places Includes design elements: Individual business-owner decisions on building architecture, colors, exterior materials, landscaping and signage can positively impact the overall appeal of the community Spring Green has tapped into this design element, since it is the home of Frank Lloyd Wright, but has created a series of activities around that theme ( home of a Shakesperean Theater Company, growing the Fall Art Tour) Richard Brooks says that if you want them to stay, tourists need things to do for four times as long as it takes them to travel there.
  • the Villa Louis in Prairie du Chien has done a great job of creating an appealing experience for visitors by hosting “breakfasts in a Victorian Kitchen” So instead of simply taking a tour and listening to a talk about the food prepared in the late 1800’s participants pay a fee to actually prepare traditional foods of the time using a wood fired iron stove, hand beaters, and set a traditional table.. then of course enjoy a locally grown, seasonal meal together!
  • Bill

Great places ferryville presentation 6 28-10 Great places ferryville presentation 6 28-10 Presentation Transcript