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  • Sometimes discussions about economic dev focus on “tax base”. I see tax base as a bi-product of the creation of jobs, income, and wealth. And….one cannot talk about tax base without some discussion of the cost of public services. And….there are certainly examples where the addition of businesses and employers can in fact have a negative impact on tax base…The adult book store on Main StreetAn industry that has a negative impact on the air, water or land….i.e. the paper industry…Oscar Meyers in Madison- A business that dominates a market, pays low wages and benefits, and crowds out existing businesses that paid livable wages
  • Describe what an “asset based strategy” is and how it is different from other strategies. There are a number of asset based economic development strategies that have emerged in recent years – and several that groups and organizations are pursuing on our area- including - “Economic Gardening”- Littleton Colorado, “Enterprise Facilitation”- pioneered by Ernesto Sirolli and “HomeTown Competitiveness” - a model being piloted in the entire state of Nebraska.
  • There are a number of asset based economic development strategies that have emerged in recent years – and several that groups and organizations are pursuing on our area- including - “Economic Gardening”- Littleton Colorado, “Enterprise Facilitation”- pioneered by Ernesto Sirolli and “HomeTown Competitiveness” - a model being piloted in the entire state of Nebraska. This is a partnership between the Heartland Center for Leadership Development, the Nebraska Community Foundation and the Center for Rural Entrepreneurship.The Hometown CompetetivenessModel is a partnership between the Heartland Center for Leadership Development, the Nebraska Community Foundation and the Center for Rural Entrepreneurship. We chose to highlight this model in particular because it is a more systematic strategy for rural economic development and focuses on areas that are almost always under developed in rural communities. This approach rejects traditional tunnel vision of “smokestack chasing” for economic development to focus instead on:Leadership development strives to strengthen the capacity of residents to improve and sustain their community. The goal of youth development is to support and enhance the idea of adults and youth working together to create opportunities for youth to stay in or return to the community. The purpose of developing charitable assets is to strengthen and sustain charitable giving at the local level in order to build an endowment that will sustain local civic institutions and create a new source of opportunity capital for community economic development efforts. The efforts of entrepreneurial development work to identify and assess entrepreneurial talent in the community and to devise an economic development strategy to increase entrepreneurial business development.I’d like to touch briefly on some of the programs we are working on in Crawford County to address these four areas- Tourism Development, Inventors and Entrepreneurs Club, and the Crawford County Community FundI’d like to note that while there are project in the works in of these areas in Crawford County these have become our areas of focus not so much because we read about how its working elsewhere but more because we are starting with what we have and these are the areas that are working on the ground.
  • NOT SURE WHAT TODO WITH THIS SLIDE??
  • The Community Capitals FrameworkCornelia and Jan Flora (2008) developed the Community Capitals Framework as an approach to analyze how communities work. Based on their research to uncover characteristics of entrepreneurial and sustainable communities, they found that the communities most successful in supporting healthy sustainable community and economic development paid attention to all seven types of capital: natural, cultural, human, social, political, financial and built. In addition to identifying the capitals and the role each plays in community economic development, this approach also focuses on the interaction among these seven capitals as well as how investments in one capital can build assets in others. The seven capitals include: Naturalcapital: Those assets that abide in a location, including resources, amenities and natural beauty.Cultural capital: Reflects the way people “know the world” and how to act within it. Cultural capital includes the dynamics of who we know and feel comfortable with, what heritages are valued, collaboration across races, ethnicities, and generations, etc. Cultural capital influences what voices are heard and listened to, which voices have influence in what areas, and how creativity, innovation, and influence emerge and are nurtured. Cultural capital might include ethnic festivals, multi-lingual populations or a strong work ethic.Human capital: The skills and abilities of people, as well as the ability to access outside resources and bodies of knowledge in order to increase understanding and to identify promising practices. Human capital also addresses leadership’s ability to “lead across differences,” to focus on assets, to be inclusive and participatory, and to be proactive in shaping the future of the community or group.  Social capital: Reflects the connections among people and organizations or the social glue to make things happen.Bonding social capital refers to those close ties that build community cohesion. Bridging social capital involves weak ties that create and maintain bridges among organizations and communities. Political capital: The ability to influence standards, rules, regulations and their enforcement. It reflects access to power and power brokers, such as access to a local office of a member of Congress, access to local, county, state, or tribal government officials, or leverage with a regional company.  Financial capital: The financial resources available to invest in community capacity building, to underwrite businesses development, to support civic and social entrepreneurship, and to accumulate wealth for future community development. Built capital: The infrastructure that supports the community, such as telecommunications, industrial parks, mainstreets, water and sewer systems, roads, etc. Built capital is often a focus of community development efforts.
  • This section represents the “Decision Making” part of the Schaffer Star
  • Unfortunately, this is often how we receive data and too often, how we deliver data.WOW, he/she sure knows a lot about data and data sources. Wish I was that smart.
  • This section represents the “WHO” part of the Schaffer Star
  • More from ABCD on asset mapping..
  • DAN!
  • Transcript

    • 1. Asset Based Collaborative Strategies for Rural Community Economic Development
      Cooperative Extension Conference
      “Connections and Engagement”
      October 19-21, 2010
      Madison, Wisconsin
      Laura Brown, Dan Kuzlik, and Bill Pinkovitz
    • 2. What to expect
       
      Welcome
      What is asset based economic development?
      Tools for knowing our assets
      Examples on the ground:
      Multicounty rural transportation system
      Inventors and Entrepreneurs Clubs
      Community Funds
      Questions and sharing
    • 3. What is economic development?
      “The process of retaining, expanding, and attracting jobs, income and wealth in a manner that improves individual economic opportunities and the quality of human life.”
    • 4. Economic development touches many aspects of the community
      Entrepreneurship
      Business retention
      Workforce development
      Transportation
      Housing
      Leadership development
      Financial planning
      Youth development
    • 5. The Schaffer Star and Progress Triangle
      DECISION-MAKING“WHAT WE DO”
      Schaffer, Ron, Steven Deller, and Dave Marcouiller. (2004) Community Economics Linking Theory and Practice. Blackwell, Ames, Iowa.
      RESOURCES
      MARKETS
      SPACE
      Visible
      Invisible
      SOCIETY
      “WHO”
      INSTITUTIONS/RULES
      “HOW”
    • 6. The Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) considers local assets as the primary building blocks of sustainable community development.
      ABCD builds upon existing community strengths to build stronger, more sustainable communities for the future.
      http://www.abcdinstitute.org/about/staff/
    • 7. ABCD – John McKnight
      Asset Based Community Development
      INSTITUTIONSBusinesses SchoolsParksCollegesHospitals
      ASSSOCIATIONSChurchesBlock ClubsCultural Orgs
      INDIVDUALSYouth Elderly Artists People with Disabilities
    • 8. HomeTown Competitiveness (HTC) is a comprehensive approach to long-term rural community sustainability that focuses on:
      Building Local Leadership
      Expanding Community Philanthropy
      Energizing Entrepreneurship
      Engaging Youth and Young People
      http://www.htccommunity.org/
    • 9. There are existing and potential competitive advantages of inner cities that can support viable businesses and jobs. The inner city can only prosper if it is integrated into the regional and national economy. Inner city distress is as much an economic as a social problem.
      http://www.isc.hbs.edu/econ-innercities.htm
    • 10. http://www.isc.hbs.edu/econ-innercities.htm
      http://www.soc.iastate.edu/staff/cflora/ncrcrd/capitals.html
    • 11. Most people think of the rural Midwest as one big farm.
      Yet industry and manufacturing have always been a key part of the rural Midwest economy.
      In fact, today more smokestacks than silos dot the rural landscape.
      http://www.thechicagocouncil.org
    • 12. Tools for assessing assets
    • 13. HOW WELL DO YOU KNOW
      Community, Customers, Potential Customers, Visitors, Potential Visitors, Residents, New Residents, Workers, Labor Force, Commuters, Congregation, Students, Constituents….
    • 14. HOW WELL DO YOU KNOW
      The people who live and work in your community, and the people who visit your community.
    • 15. It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble.
      It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so.”
      Mark Twain
    • 16. “I’ve lived here all my life and I know what this town needs”
    • 17. “I’ve lived here all my life and I know what this town needs”
      “Nuthin ever changes around here”
    • 18. “We just moved here from the Twin Cities
      and we know just what this town needs”
    • 19. Using secondary data to identify assets, opportunities and changes within your community AND Focus discussion on real issues.
    • 20.
    • 21.
    • 22.
    • 23. He uses statistics as a drunken man uses lamp-posts
      for support rather than illumination
      Andrew Lang (1844-1912)
    • 24.
    • 25. Lafayette County, Wi(pop. 16,419)
      Between 1960 and 2000 the population of Lafayette County declined by -11 percent
      During the same period, the State’s
      Population grew by 36 percent.
      http://www.census.gov/population/cencounts/wi190090.txt
    • 26. Lafayette County, Wi
      The Wisconsin DOA estimates that between 2000 and 2035, Lafayette County’s population will increase by 3.4 percent (≈15 per year)
      Wisconsin’s population is projected to increase by 24 percent during the same period
      http://www.doa.state.wi.us/
    • 27. Lafayette County, Wi
      Between 2000 and 2035 Lafayette County is projected to lose a net of -775 residents through out-migration (≈22 per year)
      http://www.doa.state.wi.us/
    • 28. Lafayette County, Wi
      The County is projected to lose an average of -22 people per year through out-migration between 2000 and 2035.
      How many people moved into Lafayette County between 2007 and 2008?
      a) 12
      b) 123
      c) 413
      d) 758
    • 29. Lafayette County, Wi
      The County is projected to lose an average of -22 people per year through out-migration between 2000 and 2035.
      How many people move into Lafayette County between 2007 and 2008?
      a) 12
      b) 123
      c) 413
      d) 758 (5 percent)
    • 30. 758 people may not sound like many, but
      Lafayette County, Wi
    • 31. 758 people may not sound like many, but
      in ten years that’s equal to almost half of the county’s estimated 2010 population of 16,149.
      Lafayette County, Wi
    • 32. Shullsburg, WI
      642 Shullsburg residents were employed in 2008.
      What percentage of worked outside of Lafayette County?
      a) about 1/3
      b) Almost 1/2
      c) 59%
      d) About 70%
      http://lehd.did.census.gov/led/
    • 33. Shullsburg, WI
      720 Shullsburg residents were employed in 2008.
      What percentage of worked outside of Lafayette County?
      a) about 1/3
      b) Almost 1/2
      c) 59%
      d) about 70%
    • 34. http://lehd.did.census.gov/led/
    • 35. Shullsburg, Wi
      What percentage of the 268 people working in Shullsburg in 2008 lived outside of the county?
      a) 67 percent
      b) about half
      c) 1/3
      d) less than 1/4
    • 36. Shullsburg, Wi
      What percentage of the 268 people working in Shullsburg in 2008 lived outside of the county?
      a) 67 percent
      b) about half
      c) 1/3
      d) less than 1/4
    • 37. Shullsburg, Wi
      437 employed Shullsburg residents worked outside of Lafayette County in 2008.
    • 38. Lafayette County, Wi
      5,329 employed Lafayette County residents worked outside of Lafayette County in 2008.
      According to the BEA, Lafayette County residents working outside the county earned $143 million in 2008.
      http://bea.gov/regional/reis/drill.cfm
    • 39. Lafayette County, Wi
      1,318 people worked in Lafayette County in 2008, but lived outside the county.
      They earned $27 million in 2008.
    • 40. Lafayette County
      In what percentage of the Lafayette County families with children under 18 and both mother and father present in the home do both mom and dad work?
      a) 59%
      b) 66%
      c) 81%
      http://factfinder.census.gov
    • 41. Lafayette County
      In what percentage of the Lafayette County families with children under 18 and both mother and father present in the home do both mom and dad work?
      a) 59%
      b) 66%
      c) 81%
      http://factfinder.census.gov
    • 42. Shullsburg, WI
      There are more married couple households with children than single person households in Shullsburg, WI
      a) True
      b) False
    • 43. Shullsburg, WI
      There are more married couple households with children than single person households in Shullsburg, WI
      a) True
      b) False
    • 44. Lafayette, County
      In 2006 there were 346 businesses with employees in Lafayette County.
      During the previous twelve months 59 businesses with employees either were “born” or “died”.
      http://www.census.gov/econ/susb/
    • 45. Lafayette, County
      In 2006 there were 346 businesses with employees in Lafayette County.
      During the previous twelve months 59 businesses with employees either were “born” or “died”
      59 businesses in one year may not sound like many, but in 5 years, that is equivalent to 85% of the businesses in the county
      http://www.census.gov/econ/susb/
    • 46. Interesting, but, SO WHAT?
      • 758 people moved into Lafayette County
      between 2007 and 2008
      • 613 moved out of the county during the same
      period
      • 71% of employed county residents work outside
      the county
      • 38% of the people working in the county, live
      outside the county
    • 47. Interesting, but, SO WHAT?
      • County residents working in the county earned
      $143 million in 2008
      • Both parents are employed in 81% of the
      married couple families with children under the
      age of 18
      • There are more single person households than
      married couples with children
      • 59 businesses appeared or disappeared from
      the employment rolls in 2006
    • 48. CEDPI
    • 49. The Schaffer Star and Progress Triangle
      DECISION-MAKING“WHAT WE DO”
      RESOURCES
      MARKETS
      SPACE
      Visible
      Invisible
      SOCIETY
      “WHO”
      INSTITUTIONS/RULES
      “HOW”
    • 50. Appreciative Inquiry
    • 51. Introduction to Appreciative Inquiry
      – Focus on the Positive
      Assumptions of Appreciative Inquiry
      • In every society, organization, or group, something works.
      • 52. What we focus on becomes our reality.
      • 53. Reality is created in the moment, and there are multiple realities.
      • 54. The act of asking questions of an organization or group influences the group in some way.
      • 55. People have more confidence and comfort to journey to the future (the unknown) when they carry forward parts of the past (the known).
      • 56. If we carry parts of the past forward, they should be what is best about the past.
      • 57. It is important to value differences.
      • 58. The language we use creates our reality.
      Problem Solving
      “Felt Need”
      Identification of Problem
      Analysis of Causes
      Analysis of Possible Solutions
      Action Planning
      (Treatment)
      BASIC ASSUMPTION:
      AN ORGANIZATION IS A PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED
      Appreciative Inquiry
      Appreciation and Valuing
      The Best of “What Is”
      Envisioning “What Might Be”
      Dialoguing “What Should Be”
      Innovating “What Will Be”
      BASIC ASSUMPTION:
      AN ORGANIZATION IS A MYSTERY TO BE EMBRACED
    • 59. Appreciative Inquiry in Action
    • 60. Asset mappingto mobilize local leaders
      Crawford County Tourism Assessment
    • 61. Asset Mapping
    • 62. More from ABCD on asset mapping..
    • 63. Building A Multicounty Rural Transportation System
    • 64. Inventors and Entrepreneurs Clubs
      Education about the right steps to take
    • 65. Inventors and Entrepreneurs Clubs
      • A supportive environment
      • Peer learning
      Inventors and Entrepreneurs Clubs
    • 66. Inventors and Entrepreneurs Clubs
      • Using and growing networks
    • I&E Evaluation results 2009
    • 67. Gregs I&E Club study
    • 68. Community Funds: Capturing Community Wealth
      • Crawford County Community Fund
      • 69. Crawford County 10 year TOW: $220 Million
      • 70. 5% Capture: $11 Million
      • 71. Yield: $550,000 for community & economic development
    • Capturing Community Wealth
      Crawford County’s Big Break!
    • 72. Capturing Community Wealth
    • 73. Capturing Community Wealth
      Crawford County’s Big Break!
    • 74.
    • 75. Questions and sharing
    • 76. Thank you!
      Laura Brown
      Crawford CountyLaura.brown@ces.uwex.eduDan Kuzlik
      Bill Pinkovitz

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