The changing scholarly content and communication landscape
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A presentation about the changing scholarly communication and scholarly content landscape in universities in a digitally-mediated age.

A presentation about the changing scholarly communication and scholarly content landscape in universities in a digitally-mediated age.

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  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
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  • Thanks for the pointer, I had not encountered Einsenstein before! Laura
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  • See also blog post on this
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  • Read this along with Einsenstein's _Printing Press as an Agent of Change in Early Modern Europe_, to think about how fixity, audience, genre, etc interact. Really interesting stuff!
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  • In essence, components can be taken apart and reconstituted in multiple forms and across many platforms, and this can be repeatedly and in innovative configurations.
  • http://survivingmyphd.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/post-journal-era.htmlThe PLoS One modelPLoS One is an open access journal which publishes work not according to what the editors and reviewers consider significant, but consider only the paper's methodological quality. They decoupled the significant approval from the methodological approval. PLoS One also decoupled copy-editing: they warn in advance that they don't copy-edit in details, and instead provide a list of services which do just that. This model has proven to be profitable: PLoS One published more than 5,000 papers in 2010 at 1350$ each (and the other PLoS journals charge even more). The flaws here, beyond the price, are the exclusivity: authors publish only in one journal, and the danger of a future with only a few mega-journals.Post-publication review servicesThere are  a few existing post-publication peer review services, the best-known of them are Faculty of 1000 (F1000) and Mathematical Reviews. F1000 "...identifies and evaluates the most important articles in biology and medical research publication." F1000 is supposed to function as additional help for researchers in managing their reading. It has actually been shown to identify quality papers which were overlooked by leading journals (Allen et al., 2009).scholarly journal Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience, 6 DOI: 10.3389/fncom.2012.00019

The changing scholarly content and communication landscape The changing scholarly content and communication landscape Presentation Transcript

  • The ChangingScholarly Communication and Content Landscape Presentation to CHEC Board Laura Czerniewicz 3 May 2012
  • ScholarshipThe knowledge creation & dissemination cycle Conceptualisation Translation Data Collection Engagement Data Analysis Findings Discipline- specific forms
  • Scholarly content: the way we have been Literature Reviews Student Conceptual Frameworks Bibliographies Proposals Conceptualisation Notes Recorded interviews Lectures Translation Data sets Data Collection Presentations Engagement Data Analysis Images Reports Audio records InterviewsCommunity Findings Books Conference papers Journal articles Technical papers Scholar
  • Scholarly content: the way we have been Individual Private Literature Reviews Student Conceptual Frameworks Bibliographies Proposals Conceptualisation Notes Recorded interviews Lectures Translation Data sets Data Collection Presentations Engagement Data Analysis Images Reports Audio records InterviewsCommunity Findings Books Conference papers Journal articles Technical papers Scholar
  • Scholarly content: the way we have been Individual Private Literature Reviews Student Conceptual Frameworks Bibliographies Proposals Conceptualisation Notes Recorded interviews Lectures Translation Data sets Data Collection Presentations Engagement Data Analysis Images Reports Audio records Not in a shareable InterviewsCommunity form Findings Possibly not digitised Books Conference papers Journal articles Technical papers Scholar
  • Scholarly content: the way we have been Individual Private Literature Reviews Student Conceptual Frameworks Bibliographies Proposals Conceptualisation Notes Recorded interviews Lectures Translation Data sets Data Collection Presentations Engagement Data Analysis Images Reports Audio records Not in a shareable InterviewsCommunity form Findings Possibly not digitised Books Conference papers Journal articles Technical papers Stable authoritative Scholar text-based versions
  • Scholarly content: the way we have been Individual Private Literature Reviews Student Conceptual Frameworks Bibliographies Proposals Conceptualisation Notes Recorded interviews Lectures Translation Data sets Data Collection Presentations Engagement Data Analysis Images Reports Audio records Not in a shareable InterviewsCommunity form Findings Possibly not digitised Books Conference papers Journal articles Technical papers Clearly defined Scholar Stable authoritative audiences text versions
  • Scholarship: the way we have been Individual Private Literature Reviews Student Conceptual Frameworks Bibliographies Proposals Expensive textbooks Conceptualisation Online resources Notes Recorded interviews access limited to Lectures Data sets Translation course students only Presentations Engagement Data Collection Data Analysis Images Reports Audio records Interviews Not shareableCommunity Findings Possibly not digitised Books Conference papers Journal articles Technical papers Clearly demarcated Scholar Stable authoritative audiences versions
  • The nature of digital content• Principles of online content – granularity – hyper/links – disaggregation & aggregation – integration – inter-operability
  • Nature of digital content• Digital components can be taken apart and reconstituted – in multiple forms – across many platforms – can be done repeatedly – in innovative configurations• Can be analysed and mined by technology
  • Digital content• Copying content is easy and free• Sharing means multiplying (not dividing) & broadcasting• Changes in content – creation – communication & collaboration – dissemination
  • Digital content• Content is no longer static• Content can be made available – speedily (immediately)• Content can be – changed – annotated – commented on – updated – interacted with
  • Changing communication Literature Reviews Bibliographies Conceptual Frameworks Proposals ConceptualisationConversationsComments Notes Recorded interviewsAnnotations Lectures Translation Data sets Data Collection Presentations ImagesBlogs Engagement Data Analysis Reports Audio recordsTweets Interviewsetc Findings Books Conference papers Journal articles Technical papersCommunication goes online and becomes visible
  • Changing communication• Communication becomes visible• The rise of the read –write web• Communication becomes content• Content becomes dynamic• Social media changes content and communication
  • Scholarly content: what is happening Individual Private Literature Reviews Bibliographies Conceptual Frameworks Proposals Conceptualisation Shared and shareable Notes Recorded interviews Eg social Lectures Data setsPresentations Translation Data Collection Images bookmarking, Mendeley Engagement Data Analysis Reports Audio records Interviews Findings Books Conference papers Journal articles Technical papers
  • Scholarly content: what is happening Shared and shareable Eg social Literature Reviews bookmarking, Conceptual Frameworks Bibliographies Mendeley Proposals Conceptualisation Not in a Notes Recorded interviews shareable form Lectures Translation Data Collection Data sets Possibly not ImagesPresentations Engagement Data Analysis digitised Reports Audio records Data not Interviews curated Findings Books Conference papers Journal articles Technical papers Linked data Curated data Shareable data Text mining Big data Digital humanities
  • Scholarly content: what is happening Shared and shareable Eg social Literature Reviews bookmarking, Conceptual Frameworks Bibliographies Mendeley Proposals Conceptualisation Linked data Notes Recorded interviews Curated data Lectures Translation Data Collection Data sets Shareable dataPresentations Engagement Data Analysis Images Text mining Reports Audio records Big data Interviews Digital Findings humanities Books Conference papers Journal articles Technical papers Stable authoritative text-based versions The “enhanced publication” Rise of open access Dynamic multimodal Journal publishing changing versions, the rise of Eg PLOS One model rich media
  • Scholarly content: what is happening now Shared and shareable Eg social Literature Reviews bookmarking,Expensive textbooks Conceptual Frameworks Bibliographies Mendeley Online resources Proposals Conceptualisation access limited tocourse students only Notes Recorded interviews Linked data Lectures Data sets Translation Data Collection Curated data Presentations Images Engagement Data Analysis Shareable data Reports Audio records The rise of open Interviewseducation resources, Findings open etextbooks Dynamic multimodal Books Journal articles Conference papers versions, the rise of Technical papers rich media The “enhanced publication” Rise of open access Journal publishing changing Eg PLOS One model
  • Scholarly content: what is happening The rise of open Shared and education resources, shareable open etextbooks Eg social Literature Reviews bookmarking Bibliographies Conceptual Frameworks Proposals Conceptualisation Linked data Curated data Changing Notes Recorded interviews Shareable data Lectures Data sets audiences (eg life Translation Data Collection Text mining Presentations Imageslong learners, global Engagement Data Analysis Big data Reports Audio records reach) Interviews Digital humanities Access to all types of resources Findings Dynamic multimodal Books Journal articles Conference papers versions, the rise of Technical papers rich media The “enhanced publication” Clearly defined Rise of open access audiences Journal publishing changing Eg PLOS One model
  • Scholarly content: what is happening Shared and shareableEmergence of ALT metrics Eg social(use, downloads, bookmarking, citations etc) Literature Reviews Mendeley Bibliographies Conceptual Frameworks Proposals Linked data The rise of open Conceptualisation Curated dataeducation resources, Notes Recorded interviews Shareable data open etextbooks Data sets Lectures Translation Data Collection Text mining Presentations Images Engagement Data Analysis Big data Reports Audio records Digital humanities Interviews Changing audiences (eg life Findings Books long learners, global Conference papers Journal articles Technical papers Dynamic reach) multimodal Two way process versions, the rise (eg citizen science) The “enhanced publication” of rich media Access to all types Rise of open access of resources Journal publishing changing Eg PLOS One model
  • Scholarly content: what is happening Shared and shareableEmergence of ALT metrics Eg social(use, downloads, bookmarking, citations etc) Literature Reviews Mendeley Bibliographies Conceptual Frameworks Proposals The rise of open Conceptualisation Linked data education Curated data resources, open Notes Recorded interviews Shareable data Lectures Data sets etextbooks Translation Data Collection Text mining Presentations Images Engagement Data Analysis Big data Reports Audio records Interviews Digital humanities Changing audiences (eg life Findings Books long learners, global Conference papers Journal articles Technical papers Dynamic reach) multimodal Two way process versions, the rise (eg citizen science) The “enhanced publication” of rich media Access to all types Rise of open access of resources Journal publishing changing Eg PLOS One model
  • Scholarly processesthe emergence of open research Conceptualisation Translation Data Collection Engagement Data Analysis Findings Discipline- specific forms
  • Open Research• Replicable (transparency - method)• Reusable (results free for re-use and appropriation)• Replayable (tools available for appropriation)• Collaborative• Interdisciplinary• Granular• Immediacy factor
  • Openness is a serious consideration• The academic “spring” momentum
  • Changes in online academic sphere• Content – online , discoverable, can be interacted with, role of repositories (institutional & disciplinary)• Communication – part of disciplinary communities, eresearch virtual environments, blur with content• Process – transparent, visible as content, new research processes,• Presence – Academics’ digital identities (personal, professional, organisational)
  • Emerging roles & skills’ sets• Academics’ “reputation management”• Changing research dissemination strategies• Changing libraries• Curation – expert curation – disciplinary-based curation• Enabling a “culture of contribution”• New technical areas – aggregration – analytics etc• Changing research itself (eg digital humanities, data mining etc)
  • New tools
  • What needs to be done?
  • An enabling environment• Policy regulation and infrastructure – national, regional and institutional• Support for Open Access and Open Education• Attention to structures and business models• Protection and support for Intellectual Property in digital environment – open licensing• Training in new skills’ sets
  • e-Infrastructure• Investment in systems for curation - Data centres - Repositories• Investment in systems, processes & tools – to track impact – to enhance discoverability – to undertake research (text mining etc)• Harmonised regional collaborative approach – Grid services – Bandwidth – Storage
  • Enabling the “global networked scholar”• Reward and incentives for sharing content• Support for online presence / digital identity – the use of social software for scholarly purposes• Awareness about open licensing• Enabling Open Access and Open Education• Funding for and acknowledgement of scholarly communication & research dissemination activities
  • What can be done collaboratively?
  • Laura.czerniewicz@uct.ac.zahttp://lauraczerniewicz.uct.ac.za Twitter:Czernie