Stevens_P_On Scale and Abundance – Rewatering the peri-urban landscapes of Australia as a physical, social and economic imperative
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Stevens_P_On Scale and Abundance – Rewatering the peri-urban landscapes of Australia as a physical, social and economic imperative

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Beyond the Edge: Australia's First National Peri-urban Conference

Beyond the Edge: Australia's First National Peri-urban Conference
La Trobe University
Oct 2013

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    Stevens_P_On Scale and Abundance – Rewatering the peri-urban landscapes of Australia as a physical, social and economic imperative Stevens_P_On Scale and Abundance – Rewatering the peri-urban landscapes of Australia as a physical, social and economic imperative Presentation Transcript

    • On Scale and Abundance re Watering Peri-urban landscapes Peter Stevens Prof. Tim Roberts Dr Steven Lucas
    • Most arid continent
    • Watery planet
    • Experimenting with nature
    • Water,, soil and ecosystem security?
    • Great Civilisations have passed away Sir Albert Howard
    • Honeymoon is over for ‘man over nature’ Mary E White
    • Response Seamless ecology-based design
    • aligned with landscape
    • laws of the biosphere
    • plants and bacteria
    • biocapacity
    • land use patterns Dendritic Peri-Urban
    • Dendritic Rural
    • drying landscapes
    • trends Global Village % Populution 150% 100% 50% 0% 1910 2013 2050 2300 70% of greenhouse gases 2% of land cover. Lowering carbon footprint vital
    • Atmospheric CO2 (> 400 p.p.m = Pliocene)
    • Anthropocentric ?
    • Monoculture vs. ecosystem
    • Desert making
    • Choices
    • Extracentric
    • Topocentric
    • Engineering centred P.A.Yeomans’– Keyline / H.E.R.D. 1956
    • Biocentric Andrews – Natural sequence 1975
    • irrigated dry land natural sequence
    • Mollison-a Permanent agriculture 1978
    • Ecocentric Stevens -UoN Australia 1990-96
    • watered landscapes Holzer-Austria 2004 Kravcik-Slovakia 2007
    • Survival landscapes
    • Tsum Communities - Nepal
    • a sense of permanence
    • periodic abundance
    • of complexity and resilience
    • through energy and water
    • Water is the driving force of all nature Da Vinci
    • Biophilia
    • a biological narrative
    • patterns of abundance
    • on any scale
    • Newcastle Australia EcoCity / UniverCity
    • Mt Penny Rich river delta International wetlands
    • Ancient soil Fragile ecosystems Diverse, refined biota
    • Largest coal port 2013
    • Landscape integrity 2300 ?
    • 1989
    • 1989
    • 1989
    • 1989
    • 1989
    • A fundamental change in thinking 1992
    • to rewater the landscape
    • 1993
    • 1996
    • for amenity and comfort
    • 2002
    • secure deep fertile soil
    • restore ecosystem complexity
    • recover the biota and the land
    • 2002
    • 2002
    • edenow
    • Guiding principles
    • Soil is the earth’s capital
    • Our yeoman service is to render fungous bridges between humus/ plants.
    • A new human environment model
    • with food as part of habitat
    • and a bio-stewardship culture
    • An ecology-based design ethos
    • based on scales, feathers and ferns
    • in a watered landscape
    • Growth forms and detail
    • living with bushfire biochar
    • implications at a human scale
    • implications at a landscape scale Biotic ‘Recharge’ systems
    • re-aligning landuse with nature’s pattern book
    • to scale, and in patterns of abundance
    • Water retention nodes all Keypoints in the landscape
    • ‘On’ and ‘near’ contour multi-functional conduits
    • Deep infiltration , carbon rich soils
    • • Vegetation and water nodes- all keypoints and secondary ridges
    • • Vegetation and water nodes- all keypoints and secondary ridges • Seamless flow of all design elements so that the landform and natural aesthetic dominates
    • • Vegetation and water nodes- all keypoints and secondary ridges • Seamless flow of all design elements so that the landform and natural aesthetic dominates • Replace ‘discharge’ systems with ‘recharge’ systems
    • • Vegetation and water nodes-all keypoints and secondary ridges • Seamless flow of all design elements so that the landform and natural aesthetic dominates • Replace ‘discharge’ systems with ‘recharge’ systems • Use biological and ecological processes to ensure water and soil security, landscape and ecological integrity, and amenity
    • • Vegetation and water nodes- all keypoints and secondary ridges • Seamless flow of all design elements so that the landform and natural aesthetic dominates • Replace discharge systems with recharge systems • Biological and ecological processes to ensure water and soil security, landscape and ecological integrity, and amenity • Every element- multiple biological and ecological functions
    • • Vegetation and water nodes- all keypoints and secondary ridges • Seamless flow of all design elements so that the landform and natural aesthetic dominates • Replace discharge systems with recharge systems • Biological and ecological processes to ensure water and soil security, landscape and ecological integrity, create human scale space and amenity • Every element - multiple biological and ecological functions • Elevate infrastructure to enable ecological functions across contour, tenure and landuse
    • • Vegetation and water infiltration nodes at all keypoints and on all secondary ridges • Seamless flow of all design elements so that the landform and natural aesthetic dominates • Replace discharge systems with recharge systems • Biological and ecological processes to ensure water and soil security, landscape and ecological integrity, create human scale space and amenity • Every element multiple biological and ecological functions • Elevate infrastructure to enable ecological functions across contour, tenure and landuse • Establish cities and towns as ‘forest’ rather than ‘desert’ ecosystems
    • Conventional urban settlement outcomes
    • Remnant bushland perceived risk Primary Ridge
    • Subsidence risk Primary Ridge
    • Earthquake 1989 Primary Ridge
    • Inundation risk Eucalypt bushland Tectonic events 1989 Subsidence potential Primary Ridge
    • Disaster OR Ecotown in the making ? Bio / Ecological abundance ?
    • Biophilic / Ecotowns Bushland Campus Regional Hospital Developing City Conservation area Newcastle Hill
    • Bushland Campus Regional Hospital High value topography >60m ASL Biophilic / Ecotown capacity Developing City Conservation area Newcastle Hill
    • Bushland Campus Regional Hospital Watered landscapes High anthropocentric biocapacity Developing City Conservation area Newcastle Hill
    • Bushland Campus Regional Hospital Anthropocentric biocapacity Developing City High Ecocentric biocapacity Conservation area Newcastle Hill
    • High value ecologically productive landscapes High value / potential for >70% vegetation cover High value topography and orientation >60m ASL High value long term biophilic city /town potential
    • Conventional peri-urban landuse Kate Flint, author
    • Primary Ridge Remnant bushland ‘perceived risk’
    • Primary Ridge ‘ Developable’ landscape Currently low Anthropocentric biocapacity
    • Primary Ridge Currently low value Ecocentric biocapacity
    • Primary Ridge Current low value ad hoc biocapacity
    • Landuse aligned with biocapacity Forest like Bio/ Ecotown models >70% vegetation cover Ecologically productive landscapes
    • Biophilic / EcoCity modelling
    • Primary Ridge High value watered landscapes High Anthropocentric biocapacity
    • Primary Ridge Watered landscapes, High value Ecocentric biocapacity
    • Ecologically Engineered High value watered landscapes High Anthropocentric biocapacity
    • Ecologically Engineered Watered landscapes, High value Ecocentric biocapacity
    • Biologically developed High value watered landscapes High Anthropocentric biocapacity
    • Biologically developed Watered landscapes, High value Ecocentric biocapacity
    • • Vegetation and water nodes- all keypoints and secondary ridges • Seamless flow of all design elements so that the landform and natural aesthetic dominates • Replace discharge systems with recharge systems • Biological and ecological processes to ensure water and soil security, landscape and ecological integrity, and amenity • Every element- multiple biological and ecological functions • Elevate infrastructure to enable ecological functions across tenure and landuse • Establish cities and towns as forest ecosystems rather than desert ecosystems • Connect peri-urban landscapes at ‘root, branch and canopy level to secure energy and water
    • Peter Stevens peter.stevens@newcastle.edu.au +61 431 333 337 Tom Farrell Institute University of Newcastle, Australia Prof. Timothy Roberts Dr Steven Lucas