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Cyber Bullying

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  • 1. Lars Soderberg Communication & Technology 250
  • 2. Research Question How prevelent is cyber bullying among teenagers?
  • 3. What is Cyber Bullying? • “Willful and repeated harm inflicted through the use of computers, cell phones, and other electronic devices.” (Schrock & Boyd, 2011, p. 374) • Stereotypical widespread problem • Anonymity – Private Messages, use of social media, doesn’t have to be done at school (Farrell, 2012, p.26)
  • 4. Power of Cyber Bullying • Growth of the internet • Permanent posts • Deadly effects – Depression, suicide, etc. (Cloud, 2010) • Fast publicity of message (Ringrose, 2011, p. 133) • Anonymity – Mystery regarding the root of the message  lack of control (Ringrose, 2011, p. 132)
  • 5. Cyber Bullying Outlets • Social Media – Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, etc. • Email • Blogs / Websites (Vandebosch & Van Cleemput, 2009, p. 1) • Text Messaging • Instant Messaging – AIM, iMessage, etc.
  • 6. “The youngsters who perpetrate acts of cyber bullying have, in many cases, also experienced cyber bullying as victims or bystanders and vice versa.” (Vandebosch & Van Cleemput, 2009, p.22)
  • 7. Causes of Cyber Bullying • The internet is a very liberating platform • Easier establishment of social relationships • Anonymity – The identity of the bully is often secret (Erdur- Baker, 2012, p. 111) – Provides adoption of “a more aggressive persona”. (Erdur-Baker, 2012, p. 110)
  • 8. Causes continued… • Easy access to technology (Farrell, 2012, p.26) • Increased time spent online spent by teenagers – Age of identity exploration (Megan, 2012, p. 703)
  • 9. Types of Cyber Bullying • Direct involvement of the victim – Viruses, internet / mobile bullying, social exclusion (Vandebosch & Van Cleemput, 2009, p. 5) • Initial lack of involvement by the victim – Online anonymity, internet / mobile bullying (Vandebosch & Van Cleemput, 2009, p. 5)
  • 10. A Cyber Bully’s Effectiveness • Hyperpersonal communication – The ambiguity of messages online may cause under/over dramatization of messages (Farrell, 2012, p.28) • Channel expansion theory – The level of knowledge in regards to a channel, message topic, context, and source will determine the level of effectiveness (Farrell, 2012, p.28)
  • 11. Exposure to Cyber Bullying • 72% of 18-29 year olds use social networking cites (Megan, 2012, p. 703) • 15.8% of young adults in a study (596 people ages 14-22) reported cyber-bullying compared to 12.3% of adolescents (Megan, 2012, p. 705) • In the study, 15.6% of harassing messages came from someone unknown to the victim (Megan, 2012, p. 712)
  • 12. Exposure continued… • School survey (177 7th graders) – 14.5% reported to being cyber bullies – 24.9% reported to being victims of cyber bullying • Online study (500 teenagers aged 11-15) (Vandebosch & Van Cleemput, 2009, p. 7) – 32% sent anonymous harassing emails – 29% sent harassing messages
  • 13. Kristensen and Smith Study • (Vandebosch & Van Cleemput, 2009, p. 16-18) – 44.8% knew their bully offline – Half didn’t know their bully – 14.1% were bullied by someone they only knew online – Experienced one form of offensive behavior orver the internet / phone over the last 3 motnhs • 61.9% reported to being victims • 52.5% reported to being perpetrators • 76.3% reported to being bystanders
  • 14. Exposure Results • Cyber bullying is different from case to case • Traditional bullies and victimization online (Vandebosch & Van Cleemput, 2009, p. 11) • Lack of responsibility by student body
  • 15. Cyber Bully Profile • Cyber Bullies – High self image – Social competence – High relationship between traditional and online bully – Lack of surveillance by parents
  • 16. Victim Profile • Victims – Girls were more likely to be the victim (Ringrose, 2011, 122) – Higher relationship between a strictly online relationship with their bully – Tend to be victims of traditional bullying as well – High internet dependency – Not socially competent
  • 17. Ybarra Study • (Vandebosch & Van Cleemput, 2009, p. 10) – Males who reported as being depressed were eight times more likely to report being a victim “Ybarra identified both the amount of internet use and the use of messenger programs as most important predictors for the experience with cyber bullying as a victim among females.” (Vandebosch & Van Cleemput, 2009, p. 10)
  • 18. Li Study • (Vandebosch & Van Cleemput, 2009, p. 11) – 1/3 of “youngsters” bullied in school were also cyber bullies – 1/3 of “youngsters” reported their bullying in school to backfire online and result in victimization – Majority of victims were females (p. 10) – Strong correlation between cyber bullies and cyber bully victims
  • 19. Patchin & Hinduja Study • (Vandebosch & Van Cleemput, 2009, p. 11) – 42.5% of cyber bully victims were frustrated – 40% of victims were angry – 17% felt sad
  • 20. Conclusion • Cyber bullying is evident among teenagers – Amount of internet use • Different devices are used • Age is a factor • Its’ presence varies on a case to case basis • More research is needed

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