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Kirkpatricks Levels Presentation
 

Kirkpatricks Levels Presentation

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The purpose for Kirkpatrick’s evaluation is to determine the effectiveness of a training program. According to this model, evaluation should always begin with level one, and then, as time and ...

The purpose for Kirkpatrick’s evaluation is to determine the effectiveness of a training program. According to this model, evaluation should always begin with level one, and then, as time and budget allows, should move sequentially through levels two, three, and four. Information from each prior level serves as a base for the next level\'s evaluation.

The purpose of Brinkerhoff’s SCM to prove and to improve impact. It is a cost effective way in determining which components of initiative are working and which are not, and reporting result in a way that organizational leaders can easily understand and believe.

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Kirkpatricks Levels Presentation Kirkpatricks Levels Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • Kirkpatrick’s Levels of Evaluation: Larry D Weas, Ed. D. Program ETR 531 Program Evaluation Education, Technology & Research Northern Illinois University Model for Evaluating Training Programs Presented by: … Brinkerhoff’s Success Case Method (SCM)
  • An Evaluation Is Worth a Thousand Words The four-level model was developed by Donald Kirkpatrick (1998). In Kirkpatrick's four-level model, the focus is four levels ( Reaction, Learning, Behavior, and Results ), which represent a sequence of ways to evaluate training. Each successive evaluation level is built on information provided by the lower level. The Success Case Method (SCM) approach developed by Robert Brinkerhoff (2003) is a quick and simple process to evaluate training and organizational change. Time & Looking at the Business Needs
  • Kirkpatrick’s Levels of Evaluation
    • Purpose of Evaluation
      • The purpose for evaluation is to determine the effectiveness of a training program. According to this model, evaluation should always begin with level one, and then, as time and budget allows, should move sequentially through levels two, three, and four. Information from each prior level serves as a base for the next level's evaluation
    Situation Driven of Different Perspectives Level One Level Two Level Three Level Four Reaction Learning Behavior Results Kirkpatrick (1998)
  • Reaction
    • How well did participants like the training program? In other words, the participants' opinions about the training, processes, and results.
    what they thought and felt about the training
  • Learning
    • What knowledge (principles, facts, and techniques) did the participants gain from the training program? That is, the degree to which learning actually took place.
    the resulting increase in knowledge or capability
  • Behavior
    • What positive changes in the participants' job performance could be attributed to the training program? This is the link between learning and workplace performance.
    extent of behavior and capability improvement and implementation/application
  • Results
    • What was the impact (ROI) of the training program on the performance of the organization?
    the effects on the business or environment resulting from the trainee's performance
  • Brinkerhoff's Success Case Method (SCM)
    • Brinkerhoff’s SCM is based on five steps: (1) focusing and planning the study; (2) clearly defining what outcomes will be considered "success"; (3) identifying success cases; (4) conducting interviews to learn exactly how success was achieved; and (5) communicating results throughout the organization.
    • Brinkerhoff used four key questions to gather information:
    • What is happening?
    • What results are being achieved?
    • What is the value of the results?
    • How can it be improved?
  • Brinkerhoff's Success Case Method (SCM) Analysis of Case Study & Story Telling Brinkerhoff (2003)
  • Brinkerhoff's Success Case Method (SCM) The Process & Outcome Brinkerhoff (2003)
    • Impact of Training
    • ROI
    • Unrealized Value
    • Performance factors that align with Impact
  • References
    • Kirkpatrick, D. L. (1998). The four levels: An overview. Ch. 3 in Evaluating Training Programs: The Four Levels , 3nd ed. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler.
    • Kirkpatrick, Donald L. (1998). Another Look at Evaluating Training Programs . American Society for Training & Development.
    • Kaufman, R., Keller, J., & Watkins, R. (1995). What works and what doesn't: Evaluation beyond Kirkpatrick. Performance & Instruction, 35, (2). 205-209.
    • Morrison, Gary R., Kemp, Jerrold E., & Ross, Steven M. (2001). Chapter 10, The Many Faces of Evaluation. In Designing Effective Instruction (3rd edition). New York: John Wiley & Sons.
    • Worthen, Blaine R, James R. Sanders, Jody L. Fitzpatrick (1997). Program Evaluation: Alternative Approaches and Practical Guidelines (Second Edition). Addison, Wesley, Longman, Inc.
    • Phillips, J. (1997). Handbook of Training Evaluation and Measurement Methods (Improving Human Performance Series) 3rd Edition. Butterworth-Heinemann. Chapters 1 - 3.
    • Sieloff, Debra A. (1999). The Bridge Evaluation Model . International Society for Performance Improvement.
    • Brinkerhoff, R. O. (2003). The Success Case Method. Berrett Koeler: San Francisco.
    • Brinkerhoff, R. O. & Dressler, D. (2002). Using evaluation to build organizational performance and learning capability: A strategy and a method. Performance Improvement.
    • Van Tiem, Darlene M., Moseley, James L., Dessinger, Joan Conway (2004). Chapter 7, Evaluation. In Fundamentals of Performance Technology: A Guide to Improving People, Process, and Performance, 2nd Edition. Washington, DC: International Society for Performance Improvement.