Adult Learning Styles Presentation

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Educators and students must develop effective strategies and methods to transfer learning outside the classroom for academic and professional development reasons in the workplace. My knowledge of adult learning styles enables me to both differentiate instruction and teach others how to meet varying learning needs.

Adult Learning Styles Presentation

  1. 1. By Larry D. Weas Transferring Adult Learning Styles from Traditional Classroom Instruction to the Workplace
  2. 2. I ntroduction <ul><li>Interest: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Demonstrate creativity and innovation with adult learning theories, virtual e-Learning, and using training technologies in new ways to support corporate merging, downsizing, and ROI solutions. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Research: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Exploring the Effectiveness of Transitional Learning: Why are learning styles important in today’s adult education & work-based training? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Professional Training Experience: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>iPay Technologies, LLC Home Depot </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Abbott Laboratories FUJI America Corporation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lake County, Illinois Technical High School Boeing Corporation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lexus/Toyota Motor Corporation United States Navy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>National-Louis University </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Education: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Present – Ed. D. Adult & Higher Education, Northern Illinois University 2007 – M. S. Ed. Adult & Higher Education, Northern Illinois University </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2003 – B. S. Workforce Education, Training & Development, Southern Illinois University </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Training & Development Certifications </li></ul></ul>Larry D. Weas, Training Management & Instructional Systems Design
  3. 3. R eason I chose this topic because of my interest in adult learning styles and special learning situations for adult students who have learning disabilities. Educators and students must develop effective strategies and methods to transfer learning outside the classroom for academic and professional development reasons in the workplace. My knowledge of adult learning styles enables me to both differentiate instruction and teach others how to meet varying learning needs. When facilitating or preparing curriculum I always ask myself, “How do adult students use their preferred learning styles to learn something in the classroom and produce the learning outcomes they wanted to achieve for the workplace?” Being cognizant of the fact that all learners learn differently allows me to provide effective instructional design and methodology.
  4. 4. I mplications <ul><li>Social-cultural implications, perspectives of distance and workplace learning, </li></ul><ul><li>Transformational learning to work-based learning, </li></ul><ul><li>Interactive learning dimensions via the Internet that are not in the classroom setting, </li></ul><ul><li>and, identify teaching and learning strategies for distance learning and new technologies in the workplace. </li></ul>
  5. 5. A dult L earning S tyles Providing training for the next generation of workers will require considerable flexibility in learning. All generations ( traditionalist, baby boomers, Gen Xers, and millennials ) still require training, but each has its own focus, perspective, and expectations about that training. Additionally, each of these generations will be performing slightly different roles in the coming years of the workforce.
  6. 6. T ransitional L earning at W ork Furthermore, to successfully manage this multigenerational workforce, workplace learning and performance professionals will need to provide training and technology that fits both the learning styles and lifestyles of the diverse workforce. The transition of different learning styles promises to do more justice to the richness of learning and evidence why learning styles are important in adult learning and training in the workplace. Lets take a look at some examples…
  7. 7. V erbal L anguage L earner Verbal Learning and Techniques: If you are a verbal learner , try the techniques that involve reading, speaking, and writing. Find ways to incorporate more speaking and writing in techniques. For example, talk yourself through procedures in the simulator, or use recordings of your content for repetition. Make the most of the word-based techniques such as assertions and scripting. Use rhyme and rhythm in your assertions where you can, and be sure to read important ones aloud. Set some key points to a familiar song, jingle or theme. Mnemonics are your friends for recalling lists of information. Acronym mnemonics use words, focusing on the first letter of the word to make up another word or memorable sequence. You can also make up phrases using the items you want to memorize.
  8. 8. V isual L earner Visual Learning and Techniques: If you are a visual learner , use images, pictures, color and other visual media to help you learn. Incorporate much imagery into your visualizations. You may find that visualization comes easily to you. This also means that you may have to make your visualizations stand out more. This makes sure new material is obvious among all the other visual images you have floating around inside your head. Use color, layout, and spatial organization in your associations, and use many “ visual words ” in your assertions. Examples include see, picture, perspective, visual, and map. Use mind maps. Use color and pictures in place of text, wherever possible. If you don’t use the computer, make sure you have at least four different color pens. Systems diagrams can help you visualize the links between parts of a system, for example major engine parts or the principle of sailing in equilibrium. Replace words with pictures, and use color to highlight major and minor links.
  9. 9. A uditory L earner Auditory Learning and Techniques: If you are an aural learner , use sound, rhyme, and music in your learning. Focus on using aural content in your association and visualization. Use sound recordings to provide a background and help you get into visualizations. For example, use a recording of an aircraft engine running normally, playing loudly via a headset, to practice flight procedures. Use a recording of the sound of wind and water when visualizing sailing maneuvers. If you don’t have these recordings, consider creating them while next out training. When creating mnemonics, make the most of rhythm and rhyme, or set them to a jingle or part of a song. Use the anchoring technique to recall various states that music invokes in you. If you have some particular music or song that makes you want to “take on the world,” play it back and anchor your emotions and state. When you need the boost, you can easily recall the state without needing the music.
  10. 10. K inesthetic L earner Kinesthetic Learning and Techniques: If you use a physical style, use touch, action, movement and hands-on work in your learning activities. For visualization, focus on the sensations you would expect in each scenario. For example, if you are visualizing a tack (turn) on a sailboat, focus on physical sensations. For assertions and scripting, describe the physical feelings of your actions. For example, a pilot might script as follows: “I feel the friction as I push the throttle forward to start my takeoff run. The controls start to feel more responsive as I check the airspeed, oil pressure and temperature. At takeoff speed, I pull back slightly, and I feel the vibrations of the wheels stop as the plane leaves the ground. After a few moments, I reach down and set the gear selector to up. I feel the satisfying bump as the gear stops fully up.” Use physical objects as much as possible. Physically touch objects as you learn about what they do. Flashcards can help you memorize information because you can touch and move them around.
  11. 11. F rom C lassroom I nstruction… Students use their preferred learning styles to learn something in the classroom
  12. 12. … to the W orkplace Students produce the learning outcomes they wanted to achieve for the workplace
  13. 13. L earning S tyle I nventory Do you become distracted by movement near you? Kinesthetic Do you write the words down to find if it feels right? Do you use words such as feel, touch, and hold? Do you prefer action stories or are not a keen reader? Do you prefer to jump right in and try it? Do you keep trying to do it and figure it out as you go along? Do you ignore the directions and figure it out and you do it? Do you become distracted by untidiness or movement? Do you like descriptive scenes or pause to imagine the action? Do you favor words such as see, picture, and image? Do you try to see words? Visual Do you like descriptive scenes or pause to imagine the action? Do you seek out pictures or diagrams? Do you look at the directions or the pictures? Do you become distracted by sound or noise? Do you prefer verbal instructions or talking about it? Do you use words such as hear, tune, and think? Do you sound out the words? Auditory Do you enjoy dialog and conversation to hear people talk? Do you call the help desk, ask a neighbor, or dislike computer? Do you like someone telling you how to assemble something? Do something new at work Spell When you Talk Concentrate on the task Read Need help with computer applications Put something together
  14. 14. T hank Y ou! “ THINK” Questions? 1. How can adult learners benefit using a variety of preferred learning styles in the classroom and transition their knowledge and performance-based learning to the workplace? 2. In the beginning of an academic course, should educators in higher institutions be required by law to administer a learning style inventory to the entire class? ? ? ? ? ? ?

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