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Story of Patrick Cragun family including Elisha Cragun

Story of Patrick Cragun family including Elisha Cragun

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    History of cragun family   most current.docx History of cragun family most current.docx Document Transcript

    • FIRST GENERATION1. Elisha Cragun was born 22 February 1786 and was the son of Patrick Cragun and motheris unknown. According to family records he was born either in Castlewood, Russell County,Virginia or Sullivan County, Tennessee. At this time no records have been found to verify hisbirth. He married Mary Elisabeth Osborne about 1811, according to family records they weremarried in Russell County, Virginia. Mary was 21 years old and Elisha was 25 years old at timeof marriage. At this time no records have been found to verify the place of marriage. Mary wasborn 17 December 1790 in Russell County, Virginia to James Osborne and Mary Whitaker.1Mary Elisabeth Osborne was the daughter of James and Mary (Whitaker) Osborne whowere wealthy slave and land owners of Virginia. Their first child, Rebecca was born in SullivanCounty, Tennessee in the year 1812, at which time Elisha was serving under General AndrewJackson at New Orleans in the war of 1812. (Further research is needed to verify his service withAndrew Jackson).2 War of 1812The War of 1812 was a defining period in the early history of Tennessee. When war wasdeclared on Great Britain in June 1812, it was a Tennessean, Congressman Felix Grundy ofTennessee, who was given the lion’s share of credit (or blame) for steering Congress toward adeclaration of war. Tennessee’s accomplishments on the battlefield during the Creek War (1813-1814) gave the country something to cheer about in a period of otherwise dismal campaignsagainst the British.When President James Madison called on Tennessee to help defend the “Lower Country,”Tennesseans volunteered en masse, earning the nickname “The Volunteer State.” TennesseeGovernor Willie Blount was asked to send 1,500 troops for the defense of the lower Mississippiregion and an expedition under the command of Andrew Jackson, major general of theTennessee militia, was outfitted in December 1812.3 Elisha’s move to Indiana was delayed byservice in the War of 1812 in which his brothers Isaac and John also served.4 Migration Patterns of Elisha and his familyMary’s (Osborne) Cragun’s older brother, Jonathan Osborne, migrated to the area that becameFranklin County, Indiana in 1811, the same year that the land was opened for settlement afterhaving been obtained from the Indians in 1809 by the Twelve Mile Purchase Treaty.In 1809, the settlers bought from the Indians a strip of land, whose western boundary wasparallel to the Greenville Treaty line. Because the line was 12 miles west, the area became1 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page: 31, (HBLL) book CS 71 .C88541969, Provo, Utah.2 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page: 31, (HBLL) book CS 71 .C88541969, Provo, Utah.3 Tennessee Department of State, Tennessee State Library and Archives, Brief History of Tennessee inthe War of 1812, Searched: Jackson at New Orleans in the War of 1812, http://www.tennessee.gov/tsla/history/military/tn1812.htm, accessed: 6 April 2010.4 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969, page 31, (HBLL) book CS71 .C8854 1969, Provo, Utah. 1
    • known as the Twelve Mile Purchase. This line crossed the National Road in the western part ofCambridge City, and is present in Treaty Line Road south of Hagerstown, Indiana.5In 1813 Elisha was among the first to draw land. The next year, in 1814, Elisha and Mary leftSullivan County, Tennessee with their daughter, Rebecca, and on September 16th he entered foursurveys of land near Jonathan’s property, the land was at the junction of Metamora and ButlerTownships in Franklin County, Indiana.Elisha bought land in Indiana through the Cincinnati land office. In the film that was searchedsome of the book that was filmed was torn. Elisha Cragins is listed in the index for buyingproperty in 1814.6 Elisha had moved with his family and with many of his brothers and sistersto the fertile state of Indiana. We find him in Connorsville, Fayette County, Indiana, where hissecond child, James Cragun was born 26 July 1814.7Elisha was an early settler of Franklin County, Indiana, purchasing land in Metamora Townshipas Elisha Cragan in 1814; and in Butler Township as Elisha Cragon in 1814. Another tract bookentry calls him Elisha Cragun (5 September 1815).8 Elisha Craigen was a taxpayer of BrookvilleTownship in 1817;On 2 March 1819, Elisha’s younger brother, Caleb, twin of Joshua, entered a survey in the samearea in Franklin County as Elisha and married the widowed Sarah (Alley) Jones who had twochildren.9 The Atlas of Franklin County, Indiana by J.H. Beers and Company states that ElishaCragun was a Pioneer of Metamora and Butler townships in Franklin County.10 In the Indiana1820 census he is also listed as the head of the family. He was living near his brother CalebCragun. The info from the census coincides with the information that we have on the family. Inaddition to Rebecca and James, Hiram was born 8 December 1816, and Mary, born 17 December1819.11The Treaty of St. Mary’s (also known as the Treaty with the Miami, 1818) was signed on 6October 1818 at St. Mary’s, Ohio between representatives of the United States and the Miamitribe and others living in their territory. The accord contained seven articles. Based on the termsof the accord, the Miami ceded to the United States territories beginning at the Wabash River. 125 Morrisson-Reeves library, Greenville Treaty, Twelve Mile Purchase, http://www.mrl.lib.in.us/history/bicentimeline/treatyline.htm, accessed: 7 April 20106 Land records of the various districts of Ohio, Register of entries at Cincinnati v. I (1814-1816), FHL film 182614,searched Elisha Cragun, A Elisha Cragins is listed in the index on page 107, and the record was not located whensearching the film, some of the book that was filmed was missing.7 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969, (HBLL) book CS 71 .C8854 1969,Provo, Utah8 Jean Tombaugh, History of the Craguns, www.fulco.lib.in.us/Tombaugh/Family%20Books/Html/cragun.htm,9 Ben Cragun, History of Elisha Cragun, http://bellsouthpwp.net/b/e/bencragun/ben42/elisha.htm, accessed: 7 April201010 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969, (HBLL) book CS 71 .C8854 1969,Provo, Utah11 1820 U.S. Census, Brookville, Franklin County, Indiana, and Searched: Elisha Cragun accessed: 7 January 2010.12 Wikipedia, Treaty of St. Mary’s, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_St._Marys, More information inthe article, also info can be found at Ohio History Central – An online Encyclopedia of Ohio History, http://www.ohiohistorycentral.org/entry.php?rec=1410, accessed: 7 April 2010. 2
    • Elisha moved from Franklin County sometime between 1825 and 1827 to Richland, RushCounty where a son, Simeon, the 8th child, was born 13 August 1827. Two more children wereborn at the home in Richland. Elisha is found in the 1830 census for Rush County, Indiana. Theages of the children match up with family records.13One can only be impressed with the way Elisha and his family kept following the frontier. Asnew lands were opened for settlement, they moved into them and developed farms bringingcivilization along with them. They settled land and cultivated it in contrast to speculators of thetime who claimed and simply held land against the hope of increased prices thus retarding bothsettlement and development of the frontier as it moved west.Settlement and speculationThe townships were in an early phase of settlement when speculative fever hit in the early 1830s,the economic bubble ended in nationwide economic depression, the Panic of 1837Forty-acre parcels began to be sold in the Pike Township in 1831 and in Eagle Town in 1831 andin Eagle Township in 1832. These parcels in Pike Township, along with certain larger parcelsfrom, and earlier date, were apparently speculative purchases. Most were resold before 1855,including all entered as patents in 1833. Five of the 40-acre parcels were located near the futureright of way of Indianapolis, Cincinnati, and Lafayette Railroad where tracks were laid in 1852.In Eagle Township, where the complete record was examined and partially analyzed, patentswere entered from 1822 to 1838. Sixty-eight parcels of 40 acres were included among patents oflarger sizes. Of the small parcels, roughly 40 percent formed part of a land accumulation amongfamily members, who assembled a holding either all at once or over several years. An exampleis the Cragun family. From 1835 to 1837, James, Hiram, and Elisha Cragun purchased three 40-acre parcels and two 80-acre parcels, 280 acres total that were all located in T18N R2E, sections21 and 22, at the northwest corner of Eagle Township. As shown on a township plat map of1878, Cragun’s owned 220 adjacent acres (not all in the original purchase location). In EagleTownship, 40-acre parcels were more likely to be retained. Their availability ten years afterpatents were first offered coincided with the later arrival of the bulk of Eagle land purchasers. 14131830 U.S. Census, Rush County, Indiana, www.ancestry.com, online: Elisha Cragun, accessed 7 January 201014National Register of Historic Places, Prepared by: Eliza Steelwater, Ph.D. Independent Consultant in HistoricPreservation, Searched: Eagle and Pike Township for Cragun’s, Patent records are archived in the Indiana StateArchives, Indianapolis, The author of the article thanks Mr. Geoffrey Scott, Records Archivist, for his assistance.Accessed: 7 April 2010. 3
    • The following map shows a portion of Eagle Township and surrounding area. The Cragun’sparcels were in section 21 and 22.The land records that were found at the Bureau of Land Management show, Elisha Craganbought 40 acres in section 22 in 183715 Aaron Beaman the son-in-law to Elisha bought 40 acresin section 22 in 1837.16 Two of Elisha’s sons bought property in Section 21. Hiram bought 40acres in 1837,17 James bought 80 acres in 1837 and in 1839 he bought 80 more acres.18With the exception of Rebecca, who had married and established her own home with AaronBeaman in Rush County, in 1835 Elisha, Mary, and their nine other children claimed land inBoone County, Indiana. They cleared it of growth including the black walnut trees which grewin abundance and began to farm near what became known as the Pleasant View Communityin Eagle Township between Zionsville and Whitestown. Not much is known about the familyduring this period. The record indicates that Mary died 14 December 1844 at the age of 54and daughter Abigail died three days later on 17 December at the age of 21. They were buriedside by side on the farm in an otherwise unmarked grave where a large black walnut tree thenstood. Elisha and his son James Cragun were both found in the 1840 census in Boone County,15 Bureau of Land management – General Land Office Records, Database and digital images, Date: 20 March 1837,Doc. 25153, Section: 22, 40 acres, http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/PatentSearch/, the land office was located inIndianapolis, Indiana, Searched: Elisha Cragan the correct spelling is Cragun, accessed: 10 Sep 2009.16 Bureau of Land management – General Land Office Records, Database and digital images, Date: 20 March 1837,Doc. No. 24331, Searched: Aaron Beaman, Bought 40 acres, http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/PatentSearch/, the landoffice was located in Indianapolis, Indiana, Searched: Aaron Beaman, accessed: 10 Sep 2009.17 Bureau of Land management – General Land Office Records, Database and digital images, Date: 20 March 1837,Doc. No. 25824, 40 Acres, http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/PatentSearch/, Searched: Hiram Cragan the correctspelling is Cragun, accessed: 10 Sep 200918 Bureau of Land management – General Land Office Records, Database and digital images, http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/PatentSearch/, Searched: James Cragun, Date 20 March 1837 for 80 acres, Doc. 25152, healso bought property on 1 August 1839 for 80 Acres, Doc. No’s: 29541 and 30068, accessed: 10 Sep 2009 4
    • Indiana.19Eva Cragun Heiner states that Elisha sold all or part of his holdings to Washington St. Clair on8 September 1845. This perhaps marks the breakup of the homestead in preparation for the nextshift to the west.20During the moves from one county to another county, Elisha encountered two Mormonmissionaries, Nathan T. Porter and Wilbur Earl. Their doctrine appealed to Elisha and his wifeMary. A very good friend, Henry Mower, a Methodist Minister, had been converted to theChurch of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He influenced their faith and the whole family wasconverted and baptized about 1842.21[Henry Mower’s daughter Susan Mower married SimeonCragun a son of Elisha Cragun.]These journals of Nathan Tanner Porter were transcribed from photocopies of microfilm bytypists from the Porter Family Organization Historical Committee and others of the Porterfamily. Spelling is left as it was written in his journal. JOURNAL ENTRY OF NATHAN T. PORTER19 1840 U.S. Census, Boone County, Indiana, Searched: Elisha Cragun, www.ancestry.com, accessed: 7 January201020 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969, Need to find the land record thatElisha sold to Washington St. Clair, page 33, (HBLL) book CS 71 .C8854 1969, Provo, Utah21 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969,page 33, (HBLL) book CS 71 .C88541969, Provo, Utah 5
    • Missionary to Elisha Cragun and family Nathan T. Porter Henry MowerAt the semi-annual conference held on the 6th of October 1841, I wascalled and ordained to the office of an Elder in the Quorum of Seventies,and voluntarily sent forth into the ministry in the company with ElderHenry Mowerry [Mower].We took our journey eastward, passed through the state of Illinoispreaching by the way until we arrived into the State of Indiana, adistance of near three hundred miles. Now the field which we hadselected to labor in lay still 300 miles east, being in the state ofPennsylvania where resided the relatives of Elder Mowerry [Mower[,whom he desired to visit, and if possible, convince them to the principlesof the gospel.Feeling anxious to make the journey as soon as possible, we made but apassing in the neighborhoods through which we passed notwithstandingthe many earnest requests for us to tarry and continue our meetings.Therefore I began to query in my mind as to whether or no we weredoing right in making such great haste to reach any certain point, unlessinstructed to do, in as much as there were many perishing by the waywho were willing and anxious to hear, and that one soul was preciousin the sight of the Lord as another. I finally expressed my feeling to mycompanion and remarked that I had many kindred in the eastern stateswhom I would like to visit, and if possible be instrumental in bringingthem into the church, but as we were on the Lords errand, I felt willingto labor in any part where there was a door open unless instructedotherwise. He replied that there would be Elders passing through sothat all would have an opportunity hearing in due time. 6
    • So we continued on until we arrived into the middle part of the State ofIndiana. Stopping for the night in a little town called Northfield, we gaveout an appointment to hold a meeting that evening which so soon circulatedby the good landlord with whom we put up, sending out a boy on horse backwith a bell which he rang as he rode through the streets crying at the top ofhis voice, “Mormon Preachers will preach in the school house tonight at 7o’clock”. The people seemed to come out in mass, manifesting unusual interest, the house being filled to overflowing. We had unusual liberty in setting forth the principles of the gospel which was listened to with marked attention. At the close of the meeting many came and shook hands with us saying that they were much pleased in what they had heard, soliciting us to tarry awhile with them as they wished to hear more of our doctrine. I and Elder Mowerry [Mower] replied that we could not stop longer as we were anxious to get on to our field of labor in Pennsylvania. So on the morrow we resumed our journey but we had not proceeded but a short distance when the Lord withdrew his spirit from us, leaving us as it were, under a cloud of darkness. A spirit of despair seemed to brood over us, which the way seemed to be entirely hedged up before us. We therefore came to a halt, and returning a little way from the road, we bowed before the Lord in humble prayer asking to know his will concerning us, and inasmuch as our way seemed to be dark before us, that he would guide us whether he would have us to go. We arose and after a little further consultation decided to turn our course to the north, and thus taking through the forest on our left, we preceded on intersecting the state road running from Indianapolis to Michigan City on the north. We now felt much relieved in spirit so that Elder Mowerry (Mower) began to conclude that his family were sick, or something had occurred, which required his return home as we were bordering in that direction. After traveling a short distance, we came to a cross road running east and west. We took it to the west which turned our faces homeward. Feeling no check in our feelings, continued on and soon meet a stranger of whom we made inquiry as to the people in that section with regard to religion. He mentioned several denominations which frequently held meetings in his neighborhood. We informed him that we were Latter Day Saint ministers and would like to hold a meeting in the neighborhood for the evening, it being near sundown. Whereupon he informed us that four ministers calling themselves Latter Day Saints, came into the neighborhood and held several meetings, and had passed on but a few days since, leaving the people in a state of great excitement, being anxious to hear further, but they could not prevail on them to stay longer. He said their ministers could do nothing with them. He informed us that there was a family by the name of Snodgrass in the neighborhood who had once belonged to the Mormons, so called, but 7
    • had left them during their persecution in Missouri. He directed us to hisresidence. As we approached his house we were met by members of thefamily. They having recognized us by our mode of traveling as beingMormon Elders. We were hailed with gladness as they were anxiousto have some of the Elders come into the neighborhood, who wouldstop and labor in that section. We now learned more fully as to thoseministers referred to by our informant, whose names are as follows:Joseph Straton, David Fulmer, James Flanigan and Elisha Sheets.These Elders, like ourselves, were pressing on to a certain point, whiletheir labors were needed and loudly called for in the sections they werepassing through. But the Lord stopped us in the way and thus we wereturned to this field of labor which soon opened out to the distance ofsixty miles in length. We labored in this section until the first of March,1842, having organized three branches, numbering in all sixty members.Thus the lord blessed our labors in the ministry. Having learned that myElder brother Chauncy Warriner was holding meetings in MontgomeryCounty on the Wabash River, some sixty or eighty miles distance, I setout to pay him a visit before Elder Mowerry [Mower] should leave,taking with me one of our converts as a companion. He had relatives inthat section who he desired to visit in the hope of convincing them of thetruth of the gospel.Upon my arrival I learned that my brother had returned home toNauvoo leaving his fellow laborer, Elder Wilber J. Earl, with whom Imade arrangements to travel and continue our labors together and ashe had need to remain a short time, we arrange for him to join me atthe branches where I had been laboring. And so I returned with mynew convert who was somewhat cast down in his feelings by the coldreception he had received from his relatives as soon as they learned thathe had joined the Latter Day Saints or Mormons, as they were called.I consoled him by referring to the saying of the Savior that a prophetis not without honor save in his own country and among his kin folks.Upon our arrival I informed Elder Mowerry [Mower] of my visit andmy arrangement with Elder Earl. He therefore tarried until his [ElderEarl’s] arrival, after which he departed on his return home.We continued our labors in the branches until sometime in May,1842, having held three public discussions with different ministers,or rather two as one. A Lutheran minister withdrew his attack in thepresence of a large concourse of people who had gathered at the placeappointed. He had consulted with the leading minister of his churchresiding in Kentucky, who came by his request to visit him, and on seeingthe proposition, told him that he had no advantage of his antagonistand therefore would be defeated. We took leave of the saints anddeparted into the State of Ohio, Elder Earl having a brother living in thenorthwest part of the state whom he desired to visit. 8
    • We therefore made for that point, holding meetings by the way. We arrived sometime in July 1842. We stayed here about six weeks holding meetings in the different neighborhoods around about in that section, after which we returned to the branches and found them in good health and spirits. Soon after our arrival we were visited by several Elders who had been laboring a short distance to the north of us on the Wabash. They raised up a branch of the church in that section. Their names are as follows: Alvin T. Tibitts, Ezra Strong, Moses Martin and James McGavin. We were much pleased to meet them and learn of their success. About the fifteenth of the following October, we in company with several families of the saints, set out on our return home to Nauvoo, arriving the first of November 1842, having been absent thirteen months. I saw that much improvement had been made in the city and surrounding country during my absence. The basement of the Temple was in progress of erection, also the Nauvoo House. Found my folks all well and pleased to be associated with them again.22 THE MORMON PIONEER TRAILTRAIL EXPERIENCEThe Mormon Pioneers shared similar experiences with others traveling west; thedrudgery of walking hundreds of miles, suffocating dust, violent thunderstorms,mud, temperature extremes, bad water, poor forage, sickness, and death. Theyrecorded their experiences in journals, diaries, and letters that have become a part oftheir heritage.The Mormons, however, were a unique part of this migration. Their move to theValley of the Great Salt Lake was not entirely voluntary, but to maintain a religiousand cultural identity it was necessary to find an isolated area where they couldpermanently settle and practice their religion in peace. This was a movement of anentire people, an entire religion, and an entire culture driven by religious fervor anddetermination.February 4, 1846. First wagons leave Nauvoo, Illinois, and cross the Mississippi River. "Thegreat severity of the weather, and...the difficulty of crossing the river during many days ofrunning ice, all combined to delay our departure, though for several days the bridge of ice acrossthe Mississippi greatly facilitated the crossing." BRIGHAM YOUNG, February 28, 1846The Mormon pioneers learned quickly to be well-organized. They traveled in semi-military fashion, grouped into companies of 100s, 50s, and 10s. Discipline, hardwork, mutual assistance, and devotional practices were part of their daily routineon the trail. Knowing that others would follow, they improved the trail and builtsupport facilities. Businesses, such as ferries, were established to help finance the22Aaron Benjamin Porter Sr. and Rebecca Margaret Poole Porter Family Website, transcription, http://aaronandrebeccaporter.homestead.com/index.html, Nathan T. Porter – Missionary to Elisha Cragun, coy of originaljournal of Nathan T. Porter found at LDS Historical Department Archives, FHL film MS 1842-1, Salt Lake City,Utah. 9
    • movement. They did not hire professional guides. Instead, they followed existingtrails, used maps and accounts of early explorers, and gathered information fromtravelers and frontiersmen they met along the way.23THE TREK OF 1846The departure from Nauvoo began on 4 February 1846, under the leadership ofBrigham Young, who succeeded Joseph Smith as leader of the Mormon Church.After crossing the Mississippi river; the journey across Iowa followed primitiveterritorial roads and Indian trails. The initial party reached the Missouri River onJune 14 of that year, having taken more than four months to complete the trip. Someof the emigrants established a settlement called Kanesville on the Iowa side of theriver. Others moved across the river into the area of present –day [north] Omaha,Nebraska, building a camp called Winter Quarters.The Mormons left Nauvoo earlier than planned because of the revocation of theircity charter, growing rumors of U.S. government intervention, and fears that federaltroops would march on the city. This early departure exposed them to the elementsin the worst of winter. Heavy rains later turned the rolling plains of southernIowa into quagmire of axle-deep mud. Furthermore, few people carried adequateprovisions for the trip. The weather, general unpreparedness, and lack of experiencein moving such a large group of people, all contributed to the difficulties theyendured.Along the first part of the trail, the Mormons developed skills for moving en masse.They established several semi-permanent camps, including Garden Grove and MountPisgah, where they planted crops and built facilities to assist those who followed.It was during this leg of the journey that Brigham Young first organized them intocompanies of 100s, 50s and 10s. The lessons learned crossing Iowa were used byfuture companies of Mormons.June 14, 1846. Brigham Young arrives at the banks of the Missouri River, September 1846.Winter Quarters is set up on the Nebraska shore of the Missouri. Approximately 4,000 peoplespent the winter here. November 1846.24 Garden Grove became stopover for the many emigrant wagon trains and handcart groups that followed later. Garden Grove Cabin sites25 COUNCIL BLUFFS ALSO KNOWN AS WINTER QUARTERS23Bureau of Land Management, Historic Trails Office, or Historical Department, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, http://www.americanwest.com/trails/pages/mormtrl.htm, accessed: 9 April 2010.24 Bureau of Land Management, Historic Trails Office, or Historical Department , Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, http://www.americanwest.com/trails/pages/mormtrl.htm, accessed: 9 April 2010.25 Garden Grove, Iowa, Photo taken by Gary Hone during an LDS Church History Tour, October 2007. 10
    • Council Bluffs was 265 miles from Nauvoo, here was a major outfitting point forLatter-day Saints and countless others heading west during most of the overlandemigration period. Across the Missouri River from Winter Quarters, Council Bluffswas one of the most significant Latter-day Saint settlements during the late 1840sand early 1850s.The Latter-day saints named this outfitting point – originally known as Miller’sHollow-Kanesville in honor of Thomas L. Kane, an influential ally during theirdarkest years in Nauvoo. Following the departure of the Saints, it was renamedCouncil Bluffs in 1853. Orson Hyde ran a newspaper in the community, theFrontier Guardian that became an important source of information for thousandson the move to the West. Up to 90 Latter-day Saint settlements were scatteredthroughout Pottawattamie County, Iowa, of which Kanesville was the mostsignificant.26 Winter Quarters was only a temporary settlement, in 1847-1848.Elisha Cragun was a High Priest when he took out his endowments on 21 January 1846. Hissister Elisabeth was also endowed on the same day in Nauvoo, Illinois. Simeon Cragun, son ofElisha, was an Elder, and Elisha’s close friend Henry Mower, who introduced him to the gospel,took out their endowments on 1 February 1846. The future wife of Simeon Cragun also took outher endowments the same day in Nauvoo, Illinois. According to family records Simeon Cragunand Susan Mower were married in Kanesville, Pottawattamie County, Iowa around 1847. Nomarriage record at this time has been found.27No one seems to know exactly what Elisha did after this, but some of his descendantswho now live in Indiana, say that he started west in 1847 and got as far as Kanesville[Council Bluffs], Pottawattamie, Iowa and died and was buried there. However, manysearches have been made but no headstone marks his grave. This is where more than600 members of the church died in the winter 1846-1847. A few of their names are onthe plaque in the Mormon cemetery but a great many names were never known.It is unknown if Elisha died at Council Bluffs or if he was in one of the smallercommunities. SICKNESS RAGES THROUGH THE CAMPThe great difficulty at Winter Quarters, However, was not physical hardships orextreme cold only; it was a weakening plague which spread throughout the camp. Asearly as July, 37 percent of the community were down with this fever, source of thesickness was found in swamps full of mosquitoes.Coupled with the plague, privation and exposure also took a terrible toll of thesepioneers, and before the encampment at Winter Quarters was abandoned, over 600men, women, and children had been laid to rest.26 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Pioneer Trail Map, Council Bluffs, Iowa: 1839-1846, http://www.lds.org/gospellibrary/pioneer/02_Nauvoo.html, accessed: 8 April 2010.27 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969,page 33, (HBLL) book CS 71 .C88541969, Provo, Utah, search for the marriage record had been done in the Frontier Guardian newspaper that waspublished in Kanesville, at this time no marriage record has been done, more research is needed. 11
    • Scene depicting Winter Quarters28Over 300 faithful Latter-day Saints are buried at Winter Quarters, with countless others resting inobscure cemeteries along the banks of the Missouri River. Many lie in unmarked graves. Thesevaliant Pioneers gave their lives in pursuit of finding a place where they and their families couldlive and worship in peace. Many of those who died at Winter Quarters left faithful posteritywho pressed on to the Salt Lake Valley and accomplished the realization of the hopes of thosewho had died before their journey was through. Others among those buried at Winter Quartersinclude young children whose small bodies could not withstand the biting winter cold.CHILDREN OF ELISHA CRAGUN AND MARY ELISABETH OSBORNE I. Rebecca Cragun was born 25 September 1812 in Sullivan County, Tennessee. She married Aaron Beaman on 29 December 1832 in Pleasant Hill, Sullivan County, Minnesota. It is believed that all of Elisha and Mary Osborn Cragun’s ten children came with their parents to Rush County, Indiana and were baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1846 except Rebecca who had married Aaron Beaman and had moved from the home. However, Rebecca and her husband had been with the Latter-day Saints in Iowa.29 It is believed that Rebecca died before 1850 as Aaron is found living with his brother-in-law Enoch Cragun in the 1850 census and Rebecca is not listed.3028 The Winter Quarters Project, This site is maintained by students and faculty at Brigham Young University, http://winterquarters.byu.edu/ProjectInfo.aspx, accessed: 9 April 2010.29 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969,page 38, (HBLL) book CS 71 .C88541969, Provo, Utah30 1850 U.S. census, Boone County, Indiana, www.ancestry.com, Searched: Aaron Beaman, accessed: 7 January2010 12
    • II. James Cragun was born 26 July 1814 in Connorsville, Boone County, Indiana. He married Eleanor Lane 30 March 1836 in Boone County, Indiana.31 She was the daughter of Samuel Lane and Margaret McCarty of Kentucky. James became an expert carpenter and cabinet-maker. Following the line of his trade, he visited the neighborhood where the farm of Samuel Lane was located. In the course of events, the young carpenter was employed to some building and repair work about the Lane premises, and to also make some needed furniture. There, of course, the young mechanic beheld the charmingly pretty features of blue-eyed Eleanor Lane. At almost the first sight, James; heart capitulated. Being an ambitious young man and having a good trade, it was not so difficult after a time for the young people to get consent to their marriage in Harrison, Indiana, afterwards Boone County.32 James bought 80 acres of land in 1837 and in 1839 he bought 80 more acres in Pike Township, Boone County.33 In the 1840 census we find that James and his father Elisha were living by each other, also Aaron Beaman a brother-in-law was listed.34 James Cragun Eleanore Lane James was baptized 13 April 184235 He was a carpenter and a cabinet maker, he also was a farmer. He left Indiana for Nauvoo, and heard of the Prophet Joseph Smith’s death while on the way there. He left Nauvoo for the west, on 6 October31 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969,page 39, (HBLL) book CS 71 .C88541969, Provo, Utah32 Paul Cragun, History of James Cragun, St. George, Utah.33 Bureau of Land management – General Land Office Records, Database and digital images, http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/PatentSearch/, Searched: James Cragun, Date 20 March 1837 for 8034 1840 U.S. census, Boone County, Indiana, Searched: James Cragun, accessed: 7 January 201035 Susan Easton Black, James Cragun File, LDS members, Vol. 12, page 249, baptized 13 April 1843 and wasendowed on 22 January 1846 in Nauvoo. 13
    • 1845, and arrived in the Salt Lake Valley 22 October 1849. He lived in the Mill Creek Ward, Salt Lake County. He went on a mission for the church and served a mission to the Salmon River Country. He served in the Echo Canyon War.36 In 1850 James was on the census for the Salt Lake, Utah Territory, he was 37 years old and his occupation was that of a cabinet maker and he was born in Indiana.37 By 1852 James had bought property in Salt Lake.38 On 24 July 1857 he was invited to a picnic with President Brigham Young at the Lake in Big Cottonwood Canyon.39 In the 1860 census he was living in Salt Lake, Utah Territory. He has 8 children living at home and he was living next door to his son-in-law James McCarty.40 By 1870 his family had moved to St. George, Utah. James was 50 years old and they still had 3 children living at home.41 Unable to locate the 1880 U.S. census. The obituary for him says that he died 13 February 1887, after an illness of six days.42 According to the Utah Cemetery Inventory he was buried in the St. George City Cemetery.43 III. Hiram Cragun was born 8 December 1816 in Brookville, Franklin County, Indiana; he married Reiter Dooley on 18 August 1842 in Boone County, Indiana.4436 Paul Cragun, History of James Cragun, St. George, Utah.37 1850 U.S. census, Salt Lake, Utah Territory, Searched: James Cragun, www.ancestry.com, accessed: 7 January2010.38 Jennifer Smith, Family Records, jennifermsmith@gmail.com, accessed: October 2009.39 Jennifer Smith, Family Records, jennifermsmith@gmail.com, accessed: October 2009.40 1860 U.S. census, Salt Lake, Utah Territory, Searched: James Cragun, www.ancestry.com, accessed: 7 January2010.41 1870 U.S. census, St. George, Washington County, Utah, Searched: James Cragun, www.ancestry.com, accessed:7 January 2010.42 Jennifer Smith, Family Records, jennifermsmith@gmail.com, accessed: October 2009.43 Utah State Historical Society, Utah Cemetery Inventory, Searched: James Cragun, Buried in the St. George CityCemetery, Grave location: A_E_118_1, accessed:44 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969,page 86, (HBLL) book CS 71 .C88541969, Provo, Utah 14
    • Hiram Cragun Reiter Dooley Hiram spent his boyhood and youth in Rush County, Indiana, near the Franklin County line and was 19 years of age when the family moved to Boone County. On 20 March 1837 Hiram purchased 40 acres with his brother James and his father Elisha in Eagle Township, Boone County.45 He was reared a farmer and spent the remainder of his life in Eagle Township, Boone County as a farmer. He was a man of great energy, the farm on which his father settled was very heavily timbered and Hiram did a vast amount of work in assisting his father in clearing away the fine black walnut trees and burning them in piles to get rid of them. After helping his father clear a farm, he improved another 245 acres for himself, working a good deal in the timbers. Hiram lived on this farm of 245 acres until 2 March 1884 when he died. He was highly respected. With his wife he was a member of the Pleasant View Society, which he assisted in founding, and which at first met in the “little brick” school house.46 The family was living in Eagle Township during the years 1850 -1880 according to the census. His occupation was a farmer the whole time he was living in the area.47 According to the Directory of Boone County for 1874 says Hiram was living in Eagle Township and his religion was that of a Methodist.4845 Bureau of Land management – General Land Office Records, Database and digital images, Date: 20 March 1837,Doc. No. 25824, 40 Acres, http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/PatentSearch/, Searched: Hiram Cragan the correctspelling is Cragun, accessed: 10 Sep 200946 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969,page 33, (HBLL) book CS 71 .C88541969, Provo, Utah47 1850-1880 U.S. Census, Eagle Township, Boone County, Indiana, and Searched: Hiram Cragun,www.ancestry.com, accessed: 7 January 2010.48 Historical sketch of Boone County, Indiana, Directory of Boone County for 1874, Searched: Hiram Cragun,accessed: 15
    • Hiram and Reiter were members of the Pleasant View Society, which he assisted in founding, and which at first met in the “little brick” school house. He was a man of high character, very exact, and held hypocrisy in utter abhorrence.49 He was an enthusiast in the Masonic order, a master Mason, and so loyal that only matters of the greatest importance were allowed to interfere with his regular attendance upon the lodge meetings. In church affiliation, Hiram and Reiter were Methodists, He was one of the early members of the Pleasant View Methodist Episcopal Church in the eastern part of Boone County, and for a long time was a class leader.50 Hiram died on 2 March 1884 in Eagle Township, Boone County at the age of 67 years old.51 His will was read on 8 March 1884 in Eagle Township, Boone County,52 After the death of Hiram, Reiter married a close family friend John Bowers on 8 March 1893 in Boone County, Indiana.53 Reiter died on 2 April 1914 in Lebanon, Boone County, Indiana in the Hutton Cemetery.54 IV. Mary Martha Cragun was born 17 December 1819 at Brookville, Franklin County, Indiana.55 She married Jacob Beeler on 30 May 1838 in Boone County, Indiana, she was 19 and he was 21 years old at time of marriage.56 Mary Martha Cragun About the year 1850, Jacob Beeler and his wife Mary Martha or (Elvira) Cragun and their two children, William Riley and Tyresha Ann, left their home in Indiana to go with the latter-day Saints to Utah. Jacob had a good home and was considered well to do in his49 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969,page 33, (HBLL) book CS 71 .C88541969, Provo, Utah50 J.H. Beers and Company, Biographical Record of Prominent and Representative Men of Indianapolis andVicinity, Year: 1908, www.googlebooks.com,51 Findagrave.com, Virtual Cemetery, Digital images, Searched: Hiram Cragun, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi, entry for Hiram Cragun, He was buried at the Hutton Cemetery in Northfield, Boone County, Indiana,accessed: 11 February 201052 Boone County Courthouse, Lebanon, Indiana, Probate Order Book, Volume 9, FHL film53 1900 U.S. census, Boone County, Indiana, Searched: Reiter Bowers, John’s occupation was that of a landlord,accessed: 7 January 2010.54 Findagrave.com, Virtual Cemetery, Digital images, Searched: Hiram Cragun, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi, entry for Reiter Dooley Cragun, she was buried at the Hutton Cemetery in Northfield, Boone County,Indiana, accessed: 11 February 201055 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969,Searched: Mary Martha Cragun, page93, (HBLL) book CS 71 .C8854 1969, Provo, Utah56 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969,Searched: Mary Martha Cragun, page93, (HBLL) book CS 71 .C8854 1969, Provo, Utah 16
    • day. He had lands and cattle and could have become wealthy if he had stayed in Indiana instead of going to Utah. But he built a new wagon from the strong hickory that grew on his farm. In fact, every part of the wagon was made with his own hands. He had a team of young oxen. He filled his wagon with the necessary things to start a new home. When this was done, there was no room for the family and so the two children, William, 11 years, and Tyresha Ann, 9 years, walked with their father all the way to Winter Quarters. The trip was not too unpleasant until they arrived at Winter Quarters. There the father, Jacob, died leaving his wife with two children and expecting another. However, when the baby was born, it happened to be twin boys and they both died at birth. That winter while the Latter-day Saints were waiting for the weather to break, a man named David McOlney lost his wife, leaving him with two children. These children needed a mother and Mary’s children needed a father. Mary mothered them in her weakened condition and later she and David were married and they all came to Utah, settling in Big Cottonwood, now called Sugar House. They always had milk and butter, which many of the people did not have. Mary often shared these with the less fortunate ones. She was known affectionately as “Grandma Mac.” On her 69th birthday in1887 she was honored by the sisters of the Mill Ward (Millcreek) as a grand Pioneer Lady.” Mary Martha Cragun died on 8 August 1896 in Vernal, Uintah, Utah,57 V. Enoch Cragun was born 14 January 1821 in Brookville, Franklin County, Indiana.58 He was the son of Elisha Cragun and Mary Elisabeth Osborne. He died on 29 October 1903 in Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota.59 Enoch married Mary Peters on 5 May 1842 in Whitestown, Boone County, Indiana. She was born 24 November 1820 in Kentucky. She was the daughter of James Peters and Lucy Cheatham. He was buried in the Spirit Hill Cemetery in Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota at the side of his wife Mary Peters.60 VI. Abigail Cragun was born 17 December 1823, Brookville, Indiana and she died 17 December 1844.6157 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969, page 93, (HBLL) book CS71 .C88541969, Provo, Utah58 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, “International Genealogical Index” (IGI), Database: NorthAmerica, entry for Enoch Cragun, www.new.familysearch.org, accessed: 15 January 2010, Salt Lake City, Utah.59 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969, page 93, (HBLL) book CS71 .C88541969, Provo, Utah.60Findagrave.com, Virtual Cemetery, Digital images, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi, entry for EnochCragun, accessed: 11 February 201061 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969, page 93, (HBLL) book CS71 .C88541969, Provo, Utah 17
    • Tyresha Cragun George Norville VII. Tyresha Cragun born 25 September 1825 in Metamora or Butler Township in Franklin County, Indiana. She was baptized 15 March 1843. She crossed the plains suffering many hardships. Tyresha married George Norville 20 October 1850 in North Ogden, Weber County, Utah. They lived there during their entire married life but had no children. She was 25 years old and George was 59 years old at time of marriage. The couple was found in the 1870 and 1880 census for North Ogden, Weber County, Utah.62 The 1860 census was not found. George Norville died on 11 May 1884 in North Ogden, Weber County, Utah at 83 years of age.63 Tyresha [Cragun] Norville died 6 June 1895 at the age of 70 years old at Ogden, Weber County, Utah.64 VIII. Simeon Cragun was born 13 August 1827 in Richmond, Rush County, Indiana. He was baptized 15 March 1843 in Nauvoo, Illinois at the age of 15. Simeon married Susan Mower about 1847 in Kanesville, Pottawattamie County, Iowa.65 At this time no marriage record has been found and more research is needed to search for it.62 1870 U.S. census, North Ogden, Weber County, Utah, Searched: George Norville, www.ancestry.com, accessed:7 April 2010.63 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index, Identifier: 2DXK-XST,Searched: George Norville, Salt Lake City, Utah.64 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index, Identifier: 2DSK-DY7,Searched: Tyresha Cragun, Salt Lake City, Utah.65 Utah Historical Newspapers, Ogden Standard, Date: 16 June 1899, http://digitalnewspapers.org/, Searched: Susan[Mower] Cragun, according to the obituary says that she had been married in Kanesville, Iowa to Simeon Cragun,and in the book Patrick Cragun – descendants in America also says that they had been married in Kanesville, Utah,Page: 122, accessed: 24 January 2010. 18
    • Simeon was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 15 March 1843 in Nauvoo, Illinois at the age of 15. He gathered with the Latter-day Saints to the city of Nauvoo in the fall of 1845. He was driven from his home in the winter of 1845 with the Latter-day Saints, and helped to found the City of Kanesville [now Council Bluffs] and lived there till the summer of 1850, when he traveled across the plains in Captain Foot’s company;66 Susan Mower The family suffered much tribulation, sorrow and strife being driven and mobbed with other converts of the Church. They were anxious to join the Saints and come west. Susan met Simeon Cragun while attending church in Kanesville, Iowa and there they were married. Simeon and Susan’s first child Mary Mahalia was born at Kanesville, Iowa in 1850 and died on the trek across the plains. They traveled in the Captain Warren Foote Company of 50, arriving in Salt Lake City on 25 September 1850. In 1851 they moved to Cold Springs near Willard, Utah and the following spring of 1852 they were the first to settle at what is now Pleasant View, Weber County, Utah on the 4th December 1852.67 The journey would soon be ended. It was one chapter in their lives finished and ended. Soon they would turn their faces to newer and happier scenes. They would dedicate their lives to the “Building up of Zion”, in these the valleys of the mountains. Words will never describe the joy that filled the hearts of those valiant pioneers as their wagons entered the streets of Great Salt Lake City, surely this was the place God meant when he said he would build his house in the tops of the mountains and all nations should flow unto it. No trail, no persecution, no mobbing were too great or too severe, when price was…a home in Zion. Simeon Cragun was the first man in that community to get logs out of the mountains and build houses and the first one to dig ditches to bring water down from the foothills for the irrigation of the crops. He was also the first trustee in Pleasant View, Weber County and gave a room of his log cabin home of the first school and his wife Susan became the first teacher to teach in Pleasant View. He was very active in the church, in the community and was a lover of music.68 He was a member of the Thirty-fifth Quorum of Seventies.6966 Utah Historical Newspapers, Ogden Standard, Date: 18 February 1874, http://digitalnewspapers.org/, searched:Simeon Cragun, accessed: 24 January 2010.67 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969, page 93, (HBLL) book CS71 .C88541969, Provo, Utah68 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969, page 93, (HBLL) book CS71 .C88541969, Provo, Utah.69 Utah Historical Newspapers, Ogden Standard, date: 18 February 1874, http://digitalnewspapers.org/, searched:Simeon Cragun, accessed: 24 January 2010. 19
    • She was a good, hospitable woman who could not send a hungry man from her door. It is said that all the tramps on the lonely trails found a welcome at her door and food to satisfy their hunger. Her gatepost had many marks on it by the weary travelers. Simeon passed away at North Ogden, Weber County, on 9th February 1874, of a paralytic stroke, after a few hours illness. Simeon was 46 years, 5 months and 26 days at time of death.70 Susan Mower passed away on 16 June 1899 in Pleasant View, Weber County, Utah at the age of 69 years. At the time of her death she had seven children, four sons of whom survive her. She had twenty-two grand-children and seven great grand-children. Funeral services were held in the Pleasant View meeting house on Sunday June 18th at 2 p.m.71 IX. Tabitha Cragun was born on 5 March 1830 on Richland, Rush County, Indiana, she was married on 23 December 1850 Kanesville, Pottawattamie County, Iowa to Edwin Rueben Lindsay.72 Tabitha was courted by Edwin Reuben Lindsay, a native of Leeds County, Ontario, Canada. He was born 25 September 1828 to William Buckminster Lindsay and Sarah Myers.70 Utah Historical Newspapers, Ogden Standard, date: 18 February 1874, http://digitalnewspapers.org/, searched:Simeon Cragun, accessed: 24 January 2010.71 Utah Historical Newspapers, Ogden Standard, date: 16 June 1899, http://digitalnewspapers.org/, Searched: Susan[Mower] Cragun, accessed: 24 January 2010.72 Historical Society of Pottawattamie County in Council Bluffs, Iowa, Marriage Records, Searched: TabithaCragun, FHL film 1476888, Salt Lake City, Utah. 20
    • Together they joined a group of Latter-day Saints going west and they traveled by ox-team and wagon with baby daughter Sarah Adeline in 1852. She was born 6 November 1851 on the plains of Missouri. Reuben said: “We met great herds of buffalo. My brother, Ephraim, was a good shot with a gun and he kept the company in meat during the journey. It was a long, tedious journey of three months and we were tired and weary when we reached Salt Lake City.”73 This family first lived just north of Salt Lake City in Centerville, Utah, then moved to Kaysville, but later bought good land and built a fine home in Brigham City about 75 miles north of Salt Lake City. The family was found in the 1851 Pottawattamie, Iowa census shows that Edwin Rueben and Tabitha Lindsay were found, Edwin was 22 years old and Tabitha was 21 years old.74 Tabitha gave birth to eleven children. She died soon after the birth of twins in 1868 at age 38 years. The twins soon followed their mother in death. Sarah Adeline, who was then married and had one child, took the twins in her care until their deaths. Three years later Edwin married Emma Bowden, 20 March 1871, and ten children were born to this union. Edwin Reuben Lindsay died at age 65 years, 6 December 1893 at Bennington, Bear Lake, Idaho, where he is buried.75 X. Sarah Jane Cragun was born 22 Feb 1833 in Richland, Rush County, Indiana; she was born on her father’s birthday. She died on 27 August 1849 at the age of 16 years of age.7673 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969, page 93, (HBLL) book CS71 .C88541969, Provo, Utah74 Iowa State Census collection, 1851 census, www.ancestry.com, searched: Edwin R. Lindsay, accessed: 8 April2010.75 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969,page 185, (HBLL) book CS 71 .C88541969, Provo, Utah.76 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969, (HBLL) book CS 71 .C8854 1969,Provo, Utah. 21
    • SECOND GENERATION2. Enoch Cragun was born 14 January 1821 in Brookville, Franklin County, Indiana.77 He wasthe son of Elisha Cragun and Mary Elisabeth Osborne.78 Enoch married Mary Peters on 5 May1842 in Whitestown, Boone County, Indiana.79 She was born 24 November 1820 in Kentucky.80She was the daughter of James Peters and Lucy Cheatham.81 He died on 29 October 1903 inJordan, Scott County, Minnesota82 and was buried in the Spirit Hill Cemetery in Jordan, ScottCounty, Minnesota at the side of his wife Mary Peters.83Enoch was the third son and fifth child out of ten children of Elisha Cragun and MaryElisabeth Osborne.84 Although born in Indiana, Enoch spent most of his married years with77 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, “International Genealogical Index” (IGI), Database: NorthAmerica, entry for Enoch Cragun, www.new.familysearch.org, accessed: 15 January 2010, Salt Lake City, Utah.78 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, Harold B. Lee Library(HBLL) CS 71 .C8854 1969, page 105, Provo, Utah.79 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, (HBLL), CS71 .C8854 1969, page 105, Provo, Utah.80 Findagrave.com, Virtual Cemetery, Digital images, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi, entry for MaryPeters, accessed: 11 February 2010.81 Findagrave.com, Virtual Cemetery, Digital images, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi, entry for MaryPeters, accessed: 11 February 201082 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, (HBLL), CS71 .C8854 1969, page 105, Provo, Utah.83 Findagrave.om, Virtual Cemetery, Digital images, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi, entry for EnochCragun, accessed: 11 February 2010.84 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS), “International Genealogical Index”, Database: MidwestRegion, accessed 07 September 2009), entry for William Barnaby, “John Barnaby and Ann” (undocumented);International Genealogical Index Source Number 178081, Family History Library, (FHL). Salt Lake City, Utah. 22
    • his wife and children in Scott County, Minnesota.85 After the family moved to Minnesota theyfirst settled in Bell Plain, Scott County, Minnesota and eventually in Jordan, Scott County,Minnesota.ENOCH CRAGUN AND MARY (MOLLY) PETERS FAMILYAccording to the book Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969, Enoch was bornon 14 January 1821 in Brookville, Franklin, Indiana.86 His headstone record says that he wasborn on 8 January 1821 in Brookville, Franklin County, Indiana.87 The cemetery records forMary (Molly) Peters Cragun say that she was born on 24 November 1820 in Kentucky. No cityor county is listed for her birth.88 What brought Mary’s family to Indiana from Kentucky? Didthey have family living there?According to family records Enoch Cragun and the family were living in Boone County, Indianabefore migrating to Scott County, Minnesota. The Indiana Marriage Collection says that hemarried Mary (Molly) Peters on 5 May 1842 in Whitestown, Boone County, Indiana.89 At afuture date research is needed to get the marriage record. HISTORY OF SCOTT COUNTY, MINNESOTAThe territory of Minnesota was organized by an Act of Congress passed on 3 March 1849. Bythis Act, the inhabitants of the territory were accorded the same rights and privileges that hadpreviously been given to the residents of the Territory of Wisconsin. The State Constitution wasadopted on 13 October 1857, but Minnesota was not admitted to the Union as a State until 11May 1858. Scott County was established and organized by an Act passed in the legislature on 5March 1853.Scott County, with an area of 275 square miles, is located southeast of the central part ofMinnesota, bordering on the south bank of the Minnesota River. It was named for GeneralWinfield Scott, officer of the War of 1812, and in August 1862, the county commissioners ofScott County appropriated $10,000 as a fund to encourage enlistment in the States VolunteerArmy. The river and the trails (which gradually emerged as highways), were the only routes oftransportation for nearly two decades after the real settlement of the county began.Scott County was almost exclusively agricultural. The early settlers first raised food for theirfamilies and fodder for their stock with a little surplus to sell or barter for such food, staples,clothing, and supplies that they could not produce. Soon wheat was the principal crop.9085 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, (HBLL), CS71 .C8854 1969, page 105, Provo, Utah.86 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, Harold B. Lee Library(HBLL) CS 71 .C8854 1969,page 105.87 Spirit Hill Cemetery, Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota, www.findagrave.com, Searched: Enoch Davis Cragun,accessed: 11 Feb 201088 Spirit Hill Cemetery, Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota, www.findagrave.com, Searched: Mary (Molly) PetersCragun, accessed: 11 Feb 2010.89 Indiana Marriage Collection, 1800-1941, Works Progress Administration, Family History Library (FHL) film1320110, Salt Lake City, Utah.90 Scott County, Minnesota, History of Scott County, http://www.co.scott.mn.us/wps/portal/ShowContent?CSF=935&CSI=000729,accessed: 27 March 2010 23
    • Enoch with his wife Mary and 3 children were located in the 1850 U.S. census of Boone County,Indiana.91 It is noted that Aaron Beaman was living with Enoch Cragan (Cragun) at this timeand he was the brother-in-law to Enoch. His wife was Rebecca (Cragun) Beaman; it is presumedthat she passed away before 1850 due to the fact that Aaron was living with Enoch. The censusalso suggests that the oldest daughter Mandana Cragun had died before 1850 and this wouldcoincide with the information found in the book Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America1740-1969.92 LAND RECORDSEnoch bought property in Henry County, Missouri on 1 April 1857 the land office was locatedin Warsaw, Benton County, Missouri.93 According to the book Patrick Cragun – Descendantsin America 1740-1969,94 Lucy was born 25 December 1857 in Whitestown, Boone County,Indiana. How long did the family stay in Henry County, Missouri before returning to BooneCounty, Indiana? Did they even live there? More research is needed to answer this question. MOVE TO MINNESOTAAccording to a letter by George W. Bucklin, Enoch Davis Cragun Jr. had told him about the tripfrom Boone County, Indiana to Scott County, Minnesota. It seemed to take weeks. Theprogress was very slow by the river steamer, and his mother was promised the finest furniture ifshe would only move; he wrote “I remember the great dining table and monster kitchen range.”The item that impressed his boyish mind was the tall stove pipe hat that was bought by his father(Enoch Cragun) especially for the trip.Eventually the family reached Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota, built a two room log house thatyou always had to go out of doors to get from one room to the other, and the huge table wouldnot go in the door.95According to the 1860 U.S. census the Enoch Cragun family had moved from Boone County,Indiana to Bell Plain, Scott County, Minnesota.96 The family had 6 children at this time and theoldest child was 14 years old. What was the reason that the family left Boone County, Indiana to91 1850 U.S. census, Boone County, Indiana, population schedule, district 7, online entry: Enoch Cragun,www.ancestry.com, accessed: 7 January 2010.92 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, Harold B. Lee Library(HBLL) CS 71 .C8854 1969,page 105.93 Bureau of Land management – General Land Office Records, Database and digital images, http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/PatentSearch/, Searched: Enoch Cragun, Document No. 46691, accessed: 10 Sep 200994 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, Harold B. Lee Library(HBLL) CS 71 .C8854 1969,page 105.95 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Harold B. Lee Library (HBLL) CS71 .C8854 1969, page 114. George W. Bucklin was a son-in-law to Enoch Cragun Sr. and married to Abby (Cragun)who was a daughter. He sent some letters to Mormon Cragun a brother to the author; this is how she got some ofher information.96 1860 U.S. census of , Belle Plaine, Scott, Minnesota, www.ancestry.com, online entry: Enoch Cragun, accessed:07 Jan 2010 24
    • go to Minnesota? Was there a reason why they chose Minnesota? FLOUR MILLEnoch Davis Cragun Jr. goes on to tell of the grist mill, the lower one on sand Prairie, near wherethe depot now stands, that his father and Mr. Ryer bought. This they operated until Enoch Sr.went into the army. His boys operated the mill until his return.97According to Glenn Shoemaker the son-in-law who described the mill his father worked at inMankato in the early 1900s. It is possible that Glenn’s father worked at the mill that EnochCragun owned for awhile. More research is needed to verify this fact, and to verify the dates thatEnoch owned the mill.Mr. Shoemaker was employed as the miller for the Feed Grinding and Flour Mill. Thepicturesque water-wheels were fed from the waters of the winding little Blue Earth thatmeandered through a lovely little valley. The village had grown up around this little industry, apicture card view it was, nestled with its overhead girded bridge.There were about three stores and a blacksmith shop and several nineteenth-century homes. Themill stood a short distance downstream among huge piles of boulders, which in ages past hadwashed to their, seemingly final resting place.98From the 1880s through the 1930s Minnesota was the flour-milling capital of the world. Todaythe mills are almost all gone. Of the more than twenty flour mills that once formed a tight knotof activity at the falls only five remain. These mills had stone and brick walls several feet thick,and were thought strong enough to last many lifetimes.99 MILITARY SERVICE – FORT SNELLINGThe United States gained control over the Upper Mississippi Valley through the RevolutionaryWar with Great Britain and later The Louisiana Purchase from France. This vast territory wasinhabited by fur traders and Indians still loyal to the British in Canada and lay well beyondAmerican settlement. After the War of 1812, the government took physical possession of thevaluable Northwest frontier by establishing a chain of Indian agencies and supporting forts fromLake Michigan to the Missouri River.For almost 30 years, Fort Snelling was the hub of the Upper Mississippi and the meetingplace for diverse cultures. Dakota and Ojibwa gathered at the agency and fort to trade, debategovernment policy and perform their dances and sports. Traders stopped at the fort while their97 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Harold B. Lee Library (HBLL) CS71 .C8854 1969, page 107. George W. Bucklin was a son-in-law to Enoch Cragun Sr. and married to Abby (Cragun)who was a daughter. He sent some letters to Mormon Cragun a brother to the author; this is how she got some ofher information.98 History of Glenn Shoemaker, From: Dan Wolner, dwolner@rti-inc.com, related through the Lydia AlmedaCragun line. Appreciation to Dan for sharing this information with me.99 Robert M. Frame III, research historian with the Minnesota Historical Society’s state historic preservation office,is the author of the Millers to the World: For more information about Milling in Minnesota, the single greatestsource for any study of flour milling in Minnesota is the northwestern Miller. A weekly tabloid trade journal andall-purpose newspaper for millers, http://collections.mnhs.org/MNHistoryMagazine/articles/46/v46i04p152-162.pdf,accessed: 28 March 2010. 25
    • goods were inspected. The American and Columbia fur companies built headquarters nearbyand employees’ families settled at nearby Mendota.Enoch enlisted in the Civil War in Scott County, Minnesota on 8 May 1864 in the E CompanyEleventh infantry and was mustered in on 8 September 1864.100 He was discharged on 22January 1865.101 Enoch was 43 years old at time of enlistment and was loyal to the Union.According to the 1890 Veterans Schedule says he was a private while in the service.102 Enochwas stationed for some of his service at Fort Snelling in Minnesota according to his militaryfile.103 Historic Fort Snelling104He was 44 years old at the time of enlistment and his occupation was that of a miller (flour mill)and he enlisted in St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota for a period of one year. His eyes wereblue and his hair was silver gray, his complexion was light and he was 5 feet 6 inches. He wasmustered in at Fort Snelling, Minnesota for a bounty of $33.33.105Some publications have stated that the Eleventh Regiment was largely composed of drafted menand substitutes; There was not a single drafted man or substitute in the Eleventh Regiment. Itwas composed purely and simply of volunteers.106100 Civil War Military Service Record, the National Archives, Washington D.C., Application No. 464.306, andCertificate No. 263.810, Minnesota.101 U.S. Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865, 11th Regiment, Minnesota Infantry, Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System,http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/soldiers.cfm, online entry: Enoch Cragun, accessed: 23 January 2010102 1890 Veterans Schedule, Belle Prairie, Scott County, Minnesota, National Archives, online Entry: Enoch Cragun,www.ancestry.com, Roll: 23, Page: 2, Enumeration District: 182,103 Civil War Military Service Record, the National Archives, Washington D.C., Application No. 464.306 andCertificate No. 263.810, Minnesota.104 Minnesota Historical Society, Artist: Albert Colgrave (1863), Location No. AV1981.324.20, Negative No.63128, Searched: Fort Snelling, Scott County, Minnesota, Accessed: 27 March 2010.105 Civil War Military Service Record, the National Archives, Washington D.C., Application No. 464.306, andCertificate No. 263.810, Minnesota.106 The Board of Commissioners, appointed by the act of the Legislature of Minnesota, Date: 16 April 1889,Printed by the Pioneer Press Company 1890, Minnesota in the Civil War and Indian Wars 1861-1865, http://www.archive.org/details/americana, accessed: 28 March 2010. 26
    • A month after the assembly of the companies began at Fort Snelling the regiment was full, over1,000 strong. On the 20th of September the first march took place toward the front – from FortSnelling to St. Paul, to take the steamboat for the South.The transportation was supplied by one of the very small steamboats then running on the river,with hardly room on board for the officers and two large barges.The men went to Chicago and then made their way to Louisville and were there for two days.Arriving on a rainy Saturday morning, the men were marched to a quiet residential street, andremained there in a cold rain. They were there until nine o’clock that night. The men at thattime were unaccustomed to exposure, and it was feared if that sort of thing should continue allnight a big sick call would be the result. Lieutenant Colonel Ball made an appeal for shelter forhis men, and informed the mayor that “if shelter was not found he would take it.”After arriving in Louisville there was some uncertainty as to what the next move was. After afew days very early one morning, the long roll was sounded, The regiment formed into line andmarched to a railroad depot. Daylight found the companies distributed at the different stationsalong the line, for the purpose of protecting it from guerrillas. 107The outer lines of the Union Army at Nashville on their day of victory, 16 December 1864.This move proved to be the final one, as the entire term of service in the South was passed in thislocality. It appears that during the previous day or evening, a guerrilla raid had been made on aportion of the line of this road, and the Negro troops then guarding it were either killed or drivenoff. Some buildings were burned and other damage done. As this line of road was then of greatimportance, as all troops and supplies for the Army of the Cumberland passed over its rails, theEleventh Regiment, then about as large as an average brigade, was selected as a preventive offuture guerrilla attacks.107 Clark County, Wisconsin’s Internet Library, Civil War Soldiers in the Heart of Clark County, Wisconsin, http://wvls.lib.wi.us/ClarkCounty, Source: State of Minnesota Historical Society, lots of information available on the 11thMinnesota Regiment, accessed: 8 April 2010. 27
    • The only deaths from violence in the Eleventh Regiment occurred on Sunday morning, Mach 12,1865, when George S. Hatch and Robert Bailey were killed at a small church a few miles fromGallatin by one of these guerrilla bands.On the 26th of June 1865 they started for home. Along the route the Eleventh received the samewelcome as did those who had been the heroes of a hundred battles. The greeting growingwarmer as the Mason and Dixon line was left in the rear.The service of the Eleventh Regiment was probably less eventful than that of any other regimentor troop furnished by the state, though Minnesota has no reason to regret her Eleventh offering tothe Union cause, for the regiment did the duty which, under the fortunes of war, fell to its portionand did it well.108Company E was assigned to guard the line of Louisville & Nashville Railroad from Nashvilleto the Kentucky line,109 the regiment lost 3 enlisted men who were killed and 1 officer and 21enlisted men by disease.110Between 1861 and 1865 Minnesota expanded the fort as a training center for thousands ofvolunteers who joined the Union Army. After the war, the regular Army returned. Fort Snellingbecame headquarters and supply base for the military Department of Dakota, which extendedfrom the Mississippi River to the Rocky Mountains. Regulars from Fort Snelling served in theIndian campaigns and in the Spanish-American War of 1898.111 WORK ON THE DAMAccording to Abby Cragun Bucklin her father was working on a dam when a problem cameup that required geometry; which he did as a matter of course. He solved the problem that hadperplexed the construction boss for days. The boss was so chagrined that he hitched up hisspanking team and drove away and was never heard from again. The next day Enoch DavisCragun Sr. found himself in charge of the job.112It is not known what dam Enoch worked on or where it was located. Minnesota boasts a wealthof water resources in its numerous lakes and rivers. One estimate suggests that Minnesota,excluding Lake Superior, contains one square mile of water for every 15 square miles of land.The Minnesota River Valley settlement was initially based largely on river settlement, withmany new towns relying on the river for transportation and water power, and on farmers foragricultural products. Literally dozens of steamers and numerous vessels frequented the riveruntil 1871 when railroads reached the towns of Mankato and New Ulm, consequently crushing108 The Board of Commissioners, appointed by the act of the Legislature of Minnesota, Date: 16 April 1889,Printed by the Pioneer Press Company 1890, Minnesota in the Civil War and Indian Wars 1861-1865, http://www.archive.org/details/americana, accessed: 28 March 2010.109 The Civil War Archive, Union Regimental Histories, Minnesota, Searched: 11 th Regiment, Minnesota Infantry,http://www.civilwararchive.com/Unreghst/unmninf2.htm, accessed: 27 March 2010110 Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System, Union Minnesota Volunteers, 11 th Regiment, Minnesota Infantry,Searched: Enoch Cragan (Cragun), http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/soldiers.cfm, accessed: 27 March 2010.111 Minnesota Historical Society, Historic Fort Snelling, http://www.mnhs.org/places/sites/hfs/history.html,accessed: 27 March 2010112 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 113, letters written from GeorgeBucklin to Mormon Cragun concerning information about the Cragun family. 28
    • their business. Ferryboats made their appearance on the Minnesota River in 1839 at Mendota;others followed, often staying in business until they were replaced by bridges. The first ferryin Minnesota was likely one that connected Fort Snelling with a road on the east bank of theMississippi. In the days before the proliferation of improved roads and bridges, ferries wereknown on waterways throughout the State. Over time, the ferry operations ranged from simplecanoe-ferries to large, durable crafts with steel hulls.113According to the 1865 Territorial Census for Sand Creek, Scott County, Minnesota, Sand Creekis about 1 ½ miles away from Belle Plain. 114 According to the 1870 census, the family hadmoved to St. Lawrence which is located in Scott County.115 Enoch had 4 children living athome at this time. Was there a reason why they moved around in Scott County? Were theylooking for better land? What was the reason for the move every few years? By 1890 the familyhad moved again to Bell Prairie, Scott County, Minnesota.116 They moved again and were inMankato, Blue Earth, and Minnesota in 1900.Mary (Molly) Peters Cragun died on 30 August 1886 in Jordan, Scott County, she was 65 yearsold.117 After the death of his wife Enoch lived with each of his children from time to time,he died at his daughter Lucy’s house, Enoch died on 8 August 1906 in Jordan, Scott County,Minnesota according to the book Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1906,118Enoch was 85 years old at the time of his death. He was buried in the Spirit Hill Cemetery inJordan, Scott County by his wife Mary and some of his children.119Children of Enoch Cragun and Mary Peters I. Mandana Cragun was born on 14 September 1843 in Whitestown, Boone, Indiana, and she died March 1849.120 II. Nephi Cragun was born on 4 June 1848 in Whitestown, Boone County, Indiana.121 He was 18 years old when he enlisted on 3 January 1864 in Sand Creek, Scott County, Minnesota. He was part of Brackett’s Cavalry Battalion in113 Minnesota Historical Society, History of Inland Water Transportation in Minnesota, http://www.mnhs.org/places/nationalregister/shipwrecks/mpdf/inship.html, accessed: 28 March 2010114 1865 Minnesota Territorial Census, Sand Creek, Scott County, Minnesota, Minnesota Historical Society, 1977,population schedule, online entry: Enoch Cragun, www.ancestry.com, No document available only the abstract ofthe information.115 1870 U.S. Census, St. Lawrence, Scott County, Minnesota, online entry: Enoch Cragun, www, ancestry.com,accessed: 23 March 2010.116 1890 Bell Prairie, Scott County, Minnesota, population Schedule, online entry: Enoch Cragun,117 Spirit Hill Cemetery, Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota, www.findagrave.com, Searched: Mary (Molly) PetersCragun, accessed: 11 Feb 2010.118 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, Harold B. Lee Library(HBLL) CS 71 .C8854 1969,page 105.119 Spirit Hill Cemetery, Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota, www.findagrave.com, Searched: Enoch Davis Cragun,accessed: 11 Feb 2010.120 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, (HBLL), CS71 .C8854 1969, page 105, Provo, Utah.121 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, (HBLL), CS71 .C8854 1969, page 105, Provo, Utah. 29
    • Minnesota and in Company C.122 The battalion was organized in the fall of 1861. It consisted originally of three companies, captained by Henning Von Minden, D. M. West and Alfred B. Brackett, and was known as the “Minnesota Light Cavalry.” Brackett’s battalion was detached from the regiment and assigned to frontier duty in the northwest. Subsequently it was strengthened by the addition of Captain A. Barton and 86 men as a fourth company. The battalion was placed in the command of General Sully and joined the campaign up the Missouri river in 1864. In the fight at Tahkahokuty Mountain they charged the Indians and drove, foot-by-boot across a ravine, up the hill, over the crest and down the slope, scattering them far and wide. It was congratulated for gallantry and coolness. The battalion went into Fort Ridgely for the winter and was on patrol duty during 1865, covering over 200 miles of frontier line. It was mustered out in May, 1864.123 Battlefields of Minnesota124 Nephi was discharged on 24 May 1866 in Scott County, Minnesota.125 From the book Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969, the author wrote in the book that Nephi had diaries that were written while fighting the Indians in122 Civil War Pension Index, National Archives and Records Administration, Brackett’s Battalion, MinnesotaCavalry, Company C, Date of Filing 18 March 1867, accessed: 23 January 2010123 American Civil War Regiments, Historical Data Systems, Inc., www.ancestry.com, for more informationabout the battles a good book to look at would be Minnesota in the Civil War and Indian Wars 1861-1865, http://www.archive.org/details/americana, Enoch was in Brackett’s Battalion and his name is listed on page 590, accessed:23 January 2010.124 Battlefields of Minnesota, www.americancivilwar.com, accessed: 7 April 2010.125 U.S. Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles, American Civil War Regiments, Historical Data Systems, Inc.www.ancestry.com, accessed: 23 January 2010. 30
    • the Dakotas and Minneapolis, Montana and Wyoming. She wrote that he died of fatigue and exposure of lung trouble.126 He died on 11 August 1867 in Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota.127 III. James Cass Cragun was born 4 June 1848 in Whitestown, Boone County, Indiana, 128 and died 18 December 1922 in Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota.129 IV. Enoch Davis Cragun was born on 4 June 1848 in Whitestown, Boone County, Indiana130 Enoch and Penninah Davis was married before 1880. They were found in the 1880 U.S. census of St. Lawrence, Scott County, Minnesota.131 The family was still in St. Lawrence, Scott County according to the census records.132 The family was in St. Lawrence until 1892 when we find Mrs. E. D. Cragun (Penninah) as the president of the Christian Woman’s Board of Missions in Mankato, Blue Earth County.133 The distance between St. Lawrence and Mankato, Blue Earth is about 100 miles. She was also the secretary for the industrial society and her sister-in-law L.J. Harris (Lucy Jane Cragun Harris) the president.134 The family continued to live in Blue Earth County until 1910.135 Enoch Davis learned the craft of the millerfarmed, taught school, preached and in later years did c flour]. He also [making of and cement work. It was while attending Eureka College that his first son, Xenophon was born a The family moved to Nebraska after the 1910 census, Enoch died on 29 December 1919 in Lincoln, Lancaster, Nebraska.137 It is unknown when Penninah126 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, (HBLL), CS71 .C8854 1969, page 106, Provo, Utah127 Spirit Hill Cemetery, Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota, www.findagrave.com, Searched: Nephi Cragun,accessed: 11 Feb 2010128 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, Harold B. Lee Library(HBLL) CS 71 .C8854 1969,page 105129 Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Scott County Minnesota Courthouse, death records 1871-1907. FHLfilm 1379418, Salt Lake City, Utah.130 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, Harold B. Lee Library(HBLL) CS 71 .C8854 1969,page 105131 1880 U.S. Census – St. Lawrence, Scott County, Minnesota, population schedule, www.ancestry.com, searched:Enoch Cragun, accessed: 31 January 2010, Salt Lake City, Utah.132 St. Lawrence, Scott County, Territorial Census, Minnesota Territorial census, www.ancestry.com, accessed: 23March 2010.133 U.S. City Directories, R.L. Polk and Co’s Mankato City and Blue Earth County, Year: 1892, Searched: EnochCragun, Mankato, Minnesota, accessed: 31 Jan 2010134 U.S. City Directories, R.L. Polk and Co’s Mankato City and Blue Earth County, Year: 1892, Searched: EnochCragun, Mankato, Minnesota, accessed: 31 Jan 2010135 1910 U.S. Census of Mankato, Blue Earth, Minnesota, population schedule, www.ancestry.com, Searched:Enoch Cragun, accessed: 31 January 2010.136 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, Harold B. Lee Library(HBLL) CS 71 .C8854 1969,page 112137 Evening State Journal and Lincoln news, Obituary for Enoch Davis Cragun, Date: 30 December 1919, Lincoln,Nebraska, www.ancestry.com, accessed: 11 February 2010. 31
    • died, she was found in the 1910 census for Mankato, Blue Earth with Enoch. She was also found living with her daughter Abby and her husband George W. Bucklin in the 1920 and 1930 census in Lincoln Ward 6, Lancaster, Nebraska.138 L to R – Alma Beatrice, Penninah, Virgil, Enoch Davis Cragun Jr., Xenophone Theucides Front seated: Abby Vivian, Estey Era139 V. Mary Almeda Cragun was born on 31 January 1852 in Whitestown; Boone County, Indiana Mary Almeda Cragun married Jacob Abraham Habegger on 17 March 1872 in Belle Plaine, Scott County, Minnesota.140 Mary was 20 years old and Jacob was 25 years old at the time of marriage. Jacob was born on 10 February 1847 in Switzerland.141 She died on 17 December 1924 in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. She is buried next to her husband Jacob Abraham Habegger in the Fairlawn Cemetery, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.142 Jacob enlisted in the Civil War in Scott County, Minnesota 1864 in Company I – 8th Minnesota138 1920 U.S. Census for Lincoln Ward 6, Lancaster, Nebraska, population schedule, www.ancestry.com, searched:Penninah Cragun, accessed: 25 March 2010.139 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, Harold B. Lee Library(HBLL) CS 71 .C8854 1969,page 112a140 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, Harold B. Lee Library(HBLL) CS 71 .C8854 1969,page 114141 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index, (IGI), Person Identifier:K88L-712, Searched: Jacob Abraham Habegger.142 Fairlawn Cemetery, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, www.findagrave.com, Searched: Mary Almeda Habegger,accessed: 23 March 2010. 32
    • regiment143 Jacob was about 18 years old at time of enlistment. The 8th Minnesota regiment was mustered into service at Fort Snelling and St. Paul, Minnesota between 2 June and 1 September 1862. The Eighth Regiment Minnesota Volunteer Infantry was organized during the darkest days of the Rebellion. The companies of the eighth Regiment were largely from rural counties. The men were mostly farmers, with some lumberman, averaging twenty-five to thirty years old, an age mature enough to make fancy soldiers; but being self-reliant frontiersman, used to labor and exposure and generally expert in the use of firearms in hunting, were, for prompt and efficient execution of duty, rarely equaled. At the time of enlistment the regiment expected to go immediately south, but within ten days the terrible Sioux massacre [AKA – Custer’s Last Stand] occurred, and the Sioux war which followed gave an entirely different direction to its early service. As fast as companies could be even partially equipped with any kind of arms, they were hurried to the most exposed points on the frontier. Battle Map of Little Big Horn144143 U.S. Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865, Company I, 8th Minnesota Regiment, Civil War Soldiers and SailorsSystem, http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/soldiers.cfm, online entry: Jacob Habegger, accessed: 23 January 2010144 Custer’s Last Stand, The Battle of Little Big Horn: The Prelude to Disaster, lots of information about the battle,www.sonofthesouth.net/union-generals/custer/p, accessed: 9 April 2010 33
    • On account of these circumstances the companies all served months before they were even formally mustered into the service of the United States, and then it was done only by companies.145 President Lincoln sent a letter to H.M. Rice, first U.S. Senator from Minnesota, informing him that the Assistant Secretary of the Interior would personally oversee the peace negotiations. The president reprieved all but 38 of the Indians, who were then hanged in our country’s largest execution. Most of the Indians fled west spreading the news of the new found form of violent protest.146 On 17 November 1872 Mary Almeda and Jacob Abraham Habegger were married in Bell Plain, Scott County, Minnesota.147 The family was still in Scott County in the 1880 census.148 On 7 May 1889 Jacob applied for a pension in Belle Plaine, Scott County,149 and Mary Almeda filed for a widow’s pension in 1911 to receive the pension of Jacob Habegger.150 The family is found in Cleveland, Seminole County, Oklahoma in the 1890 Oklahoma Territorial Census.151 The family had moved to Boone, Oklahoma in 1900,152 and by 1907 they were back in Cleveland, Seminole County, Oklahoma.153 It is unknown why they moved around every few years, more research would need to be done to determine this. They had moved back to Boone County, Oklahoma by 1910.154 Jacob was buried on 28 October 1911 in Fairlawn Cemetery, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. At the time of death he was 64 years old.155 Mary was living with one of her children in the 1920 U.S. census for Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. St145 The Board of Commissioners, appointed by the act of the Legislature of Minnesota, Date: 16 April1889, Printed by the Pioneer Press Company 1890, Minnesota in the Civil War and Indian Wars 1861-1865, http://www.archive.org/details/americana, for more information can be found at 8th MinnesotaRegiment Infantry, Fort Abercrombie, Dakota Territory 1857 to 1877, http://www.ftabercrombie.org/8th%20Minn%20Infantry%20Regiment.htm, accessed: 28 March 2010.146 The Karpeles Manuscript Library Museums, The Custer’s Last Stand Treaty, copies of original treaty, http://www.rain.org/~karpeles/cusfrm.html, accessed: 8 April 2010.147 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, Harold B. Lee Library(HBLL) CS 71 .C8854 1969,page 11148 1880 U.S. Census, Scott County, Minnesota, www.ancestry.com, accessed: 02 February 2010.149 Civil War Pension Index, National Archives and Records Administration, Searched: Jacob Habegger,www.ancestry.com, accessed; January 2010150 Civil War Pension Index, National Archives and Records Administration, www.ancestry.com, accessed; January2010151 1890 Oklahoma Territorial Census, Cleveland, Seminole, Oklahoma, Oklahoma Department of Libraries,www.ancestry.com, searched: Jacob Abraham Habegger, accessed: 25 March 2010.152 1900 U.S. census, Boone, Oklahoma, Oklahoma, population schedule, Searched: Jacob Abraham Habegger,www.ancestry.com,153 1907 Oklahoma Territorial Census, Seminole County, Oklahoma, Searched: Jacob Habegger,www.ancestry.com, accessed: 28 March 2010154 1910 U.S. Census, Boone, Oklahoma, Oklahoma, Searched: Jacob Habegger, www.ancestry.com, Searched:Jacob Habegger,155 Findagrave.com, Virtual Cemetery, Digital images, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi, entry for JacobHabegger, accessed: 11 February 2010 34
    • this time more research needs to be done on this line.156 She died 17 December 1924 in Oklahoma at 72 years old. She was buried at the Fairlawn Cemetery by her husband Jacob in Oklahoma.157 VI. Jonathon Osborn Quincy. Cragun [Jonathon O.Q. Cragun] was born 10 September 1854 in Whitestown, Boone County, Indiana. Jonathan married Christine Thornquist on 4 June 1854 in Scott County, Minnesota. She was the daughter of John and Mary Thornquist. Jonathan was listed in the 1885 Territorial Minnesota census living with his brother Enoch Davis. His wife Christine was not listed. According to the book Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969 says that they were married on 4 June 1884.158 Another source says that they were married on 4 May 1886 in Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota. It is believed that this is probably the correct marriage date due to the fact that Jonathan was living with his brother on 1885 and his wife was not listed.159 More research is needed to verify the marriage date. Jonathan and Christine were found to be living in St. Lawrence, Scott County from 1895 to 1905 according to the census.160 Jonathan and Christine lived on a farm between Jordan and Bell Plaine, Minnesota. Jonathan was interested in Phronology, 161 The belief that one can discern many things about a person’s personality by examining the bumps on their head.162 Jonathan made many visits to the original Cragun homes in Indiana and spent some winters in California.163156 1920 U.S. Census, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, Searched: Mary Almeda Habegger, www.ancestry.com,157 Findagrave.com, Virtual Cemetery, Digital images, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi, entry for MaryAlmeda Habegger, accessed: 11 February 2010158 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, Harold B. Lee Library(HBLL) CS 71 .C8854 1969,page 116159 Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index (IGI), Jonathon O.Q. Cragun &Christine Thornquist, marriage date: 4 May 1886, Jordan, Scott, Minnesota, FHL film 457378, Salt Lake City, Utah160 1895-1905 St. Lawrence, Scott County, Minnesota, www.ancestry.com, Searched: Jonathon Cragun, accessed:11 Jan 2010.161 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, Harold B. Lee Library(HBLL) CS 71 .C8854 1969,page 116162 Wikipedia, Phrenology, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phrenology,163 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, Harold B. Lee Library(HBLL) CS 71 .C8854 1969,page 116 35
    • The family moved from St. Lawrence, Scott County before 1910164 and were in Mankato, Blue Earth by 1920. They moved again to Belgrade, Nicollette County which is next to Blue Earth County.165 Christina [Thornquist] Cragun death date was 30 August 1924 in Blue Earth County, Minnesota; She was 60 years old at the time of death.166 After the death of his wife Christina, Jonathan moved in with his daughter Laura (Cragun) Olson in Minneapolis, Hennepin County. He was found in the 1930 census for Minneapolis, Hennepin County.167 At the time of his death Jonathan was living with his daughter Laura in Minneapolis, Hennepin County.168 At the time of his death he was 81 years old. VII. Lucy Jane Cragun was born 25 December 1857 in Whitestown, Boone County, Indiana; she married George A. Harris on 12 October 1877 in Shakopee, Scott County, Minnesota.169 George A. Harris and Lucy Jane Cragun In 1880 the family was living in Belle Plaine, Scott County, Minnesota,170 By 1895171 they were living in Mankato, Blue Earth and were still there in 1900.172 Lucy and Geor The impaired. They then bought the Enoch Davis Cragun home in Mankato.173 family had moved to Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota by 1910,174 Jonathon Cragun the brother of Lucy (Cragun) Harris moved to Minneapolis and164 1910 U.S. census, Mankato, Blue Earth, Minnesota, Searched: Jonathon Cragun, accessed: 11 January 2010165 1920 U.S. census, Belgrade, Nicollette, Minnesota, Searched: Jonathon Cragun, accessed: 11 January 2010166 Minnesota Department of Health, Minnesota Death Index, 1908-2002, Blue Earth, Scott County, Minnesota,Record No. 411332, Certificate No. 001399, Date: 30 August 1924, www.ancestry.com167 1930 U.S. census of Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota, Searched: Jonathan Cragun, www.ancestry.com,accessed: 26 March 2010168 Minnesota Department of Health, Minnesota Death Index, 1908-2002, Minneapolis, Hennepin County,Minnesota, Record No. 021672, Date: 30 May 1936, www.ancestry.com, accessed: 26 March 2010169 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, Harold B. Lee Library(HBLL) CS 71 .C8854 1969,page 117170 1880 U.S. Census, Belle Plaine, Scott County, Minnesota, Searched: George Andrew Harris, www.ancestry.com,accessed: 2 February 2010171 1895 Minnesota Territorial Census, Bell Prairie, Scott County, Minnesota, Searched: George Andrew Harris,accessed: 14 January 2010172 1900 U.S. Census, Mankato, Blue Earth, Searched: George Andrew Harris, accessed: 12 January 2010173 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, Harold B. Lee Library(HBLL) CS 71 .C8854 1969,page 117, information obtained from letters written by George Bucklin, husband ofAbbey Cragun – they were written to Mormon Cragun on 20 January 1932 and 8 February 1933.174 1910 U.S. Census, Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota, Searched: George Andrew Harris, accessed: 26 March2010 36
    • was living with his daughter Laura by 1930. The 1920 census record for Lucy and George has not been found. It is possible that they were in Florida at this time. She spent winters in Florida near the William Jennings Bryan Estates, until 1930.175THIRD GENERATION3. James Cass Cragun was born on 4 June 1848 in Whitestown, Boone, Indiana.176 He wasthe son of Enoch Cragun and Mary (Molly) Peters.177 James Cass married, Eva Elisabeth29 May 1875 in Jordan, Scott, Minnesota.178 Eva was born 17 December 1852 in MilwaukeeCounty, Minnesota.179 She was the daughter of George H. Harris and Cornelia King.180 Jamesdied on 18 December 1922 in Jordan, Scott, Minnesota.181 Eva died on 28 February 1900 inJordan, Scott County, Minnesota. He was buried in the Spirit Hill Cemetery in Jordan, ScottCounty, Minnesota at the side of his wife Eva Elisabeth Harris.182 Eva died on 28 February1900 in Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota.183 The family was found living in St. Lawrence, Scott County, Minnesota from 1880 to 1905. The distance between Jordan and St. Lawrence is 2 miles.184 All five of the children were born in Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota according to Eva Cragun Heiner.185 1918 FLU EPIDEMIC OF MANKOTA, MINNESOTA In 1918, at the height of that terrible war, an epidemic of a new disease, influenza, swept the entire world. Glenn Shoemaker family was not to be spared at least one victim to that had illness which had taken the lives of thousands and had been especially vulnerable to boys taking army training throughout the175 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, Harold B. Lee Library(HBLL) CS 71 .C8854 1969,page 117, information obtained from letters written by George Bucklin, husband ofAbbey Cragun – they were written to Mormon Cragun on 20 January 1932 and 8 February 1933.176 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, Harold B. Lee Library(HBLL) CS 71 .C8854 1969,page 105177 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, (HBLL), CS71 .C8854 1969, page 107, Provo, Utah.178 Findagrave.com, Virtual Cemetery, Digital images, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi, entry for MaryPeters, accessed: 11 February 2010.179 Findagrave.com, Virtual Cemetery, Digital images, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi, entry for EvaEvelyn (Harris) Cragun, accessed: 11 February 2010.180 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, (HBLL), CS71 .C8854 1969, page 107, Provo, Utah.181 Scott County, Minnesota Courthouse, Marriage Record, Searched: James Cass Cragun, (FHL) film 1379415,page: 282, Salt Lake City, Utah.182 Findagrave.om, Virtual Cemetery, Digital images, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi, entry for JamesCass Cragun, accessed: 11 February 2010.183 Scott County, Minnesota Court House, located in Shakopee, (FHL) film 1379418, Salt Lake City, Utah.184 1880 to 1905 U.S. Census, St. Lawrence, Scott County, Minnesota, www.ancestry.com, Searched: James CassCragun, accessed: 7 January 2010185 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, (HBLL), CS71 .C8854 1969, page 107, Provo, Utah. 37
    • country. Earl the brother-in-law to (Cragun) Shoemaker was a young married man and was fatallystricken He wasBuried on Armistice Day, 11 November 1919. The family’s private funeral procession was heading forGlenwood Cemetery as the city’s spontaneous jubilation parade was marching the same streets before thecheering throngs.186Spontaneous parades were held in every town and city accompanied by the tooting of every horn,including the train-whistles, and the ringing of every bell. However, a pall still hung over the country forthe worst epidemic of a disease called influenza swept the entire world, and was still uncontrollable. Thepeople were asked to make and wear cloth masks over nose and mouth on street-cars and in public places.Many cases of influenza were found in the Twin Cities, including 150 in Minneapolis, and it wasalso prevalent in St. Paul. On 14 October 1918 there was a city council meeting where Dr. Joseph H.Vogel, the New Ulm Health Officer, requested the banning of all public meetings. The City Councilunanimously approved. The public meetings/gatherings that were banned indefinitely included allschools, churches, theaters, bowling alleys, etc. Dr. J.H. Vogel had sent for a “serum” that was beingused in Mankato to prevent flu illnesses. The serum was a product of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester,Minnesota. Notices were delivered and posted around town to inform the people of New Ulm that publicmeetings were banned. The notices read as follows: NOTICE To the Board of Education; the Proprietors of Theatres and Moving Picture Houses; the Proprietors of Dance Halls and Bowling Alleys, to all Lodges and Societies; to All Churches, to All Public and Private Assemblages: Within the past few days, a number of cases of Spanish influenza have appeared in the city, and the disease appears to be spreading quite rapidly. It became apparent that unless measures were taken to prevent the spreading of this disease, we would have to look forward to quite an epidemic in this city. In view of this situation, the Board of Health of this city has decided that the best interests of this city and community, for the time being, require the closing of all school, theatres and moving picture houses, dance halls and bowling alleys, lodges and societies and churches and all other places where people congregate or assemble, and an order to that effect was, therefore, kindly comply with this order of the Board of Health. J.H. Vogel, Health Officer By order of the Board of Heath, New Ulm, Minnesota187“Uncle Sam” gave some advice on the flu in the Brown County Journal. The firstsymptoms of this influenza were chills, fever (100-104 degrees Fahrenheit), headache,and redness of eyes, pain in the back, eyes, ears, weakness, dizziness, and a discharge186 History of Glenn Shoemaker, From: Dan Wolner, dwolner@rti-inc.com, related through the Lydia AlmedaCragun line. Appreciation to Dan for sharing this information with me.187 Darlene Filzen, Brown County Historical Society, New Ulm, Minnesota, Flu Pandemic of 1918-1919, Year:2003, http://75.146.162.52/bchs/Filzen%20Flu%20Pandemic.pdf, accessed: 3 April 2010. 38
    • from the nose that resembles a very contagious cold. These symptoms engulfed aperson very quickly. If you were struck with these symptoms, the advice to youwould be to avoid crowds, rest until your fever is gone, and suppress sneezing.Hopefully within 3-4 days, your symptoms would disappear. Some people developedpneumonia, meningitis, and/or ear infections.188 CHILDHOOD ACTIVITIESThere were several activities in Mankato, Blue Earth County. There was a lovely hill sidelocation that was covered with rich pastures and trees. The trees could be used for variousgames, posts for tying home-made tents, and tree houses. Kids in various neighborhoods wouldhave ball teams, parades in the neighborhoods.It was used for sledding and bob-sledding in winter and grass for sliding in summer. The grassgrew so long on the hillside that it provided a slick surface for sliding on when it was welltramped. For summer sleds they used barrel staves on which to either stand or sit. It was ratherpainful if the stave struck a high spot and you’d slip off to the front, usually encountering abunch of slivers as they slid off. Many mothers had to surgically remove the slivers.One of the best uses of the trees may be to have a rope swing, one with a board seat and the othera single rope attached to a lower limb from which we could get a running start, swinging wideand high and with a twist or two.A free attraction in the town was the evening hitch-up fire drill at the main fire station at 8 p.m.At the sound of the gong the firemen came sliding down the shiny metal poles from the lodgingquarters above. The stall doors flying open and the teams of beautiful horses trotted out to theirpositions under the suspended harnesses which dropped into place on the horses and requiredonly the press of a buckle or two. The men were up on the rigs in thirty seconds, the horsesraring to go – but they knew it was only a practice drill to get them out so fresh bedding strawcould be placed in their stalls.189 CHURCHES IN MANKATOMr. Shoemaker was put on the board of deacons in the little church they affiliated withimmediately upon moving to Mankato in 1894; Glenn Shoemaker remembers when his fathertold him of a new church being built.A lot of people’s lives revolved around their church. Their social and spiritual life revolvedaround the activities there, such as Sunday school programs and church socials.When the kids grew up they would be part of the interdenominational movement called theChristian Endeavor. From the Christian Endeavors the kids went on to become Sunday schoolteachers after taking ‘teacher training’ courses, then to choir singers, soloists and director of the188 Darlene Filzen, Brown County Historical Society, New Ulm, Minnesota, Flu Pandemic of 1918-1919, Year:2003, http://75.146.162.52/bchs/Filzen%20Flu%20Pandemic.pdf, accessed: 3 April 2010.189 History of Glenn Shoemaker, From: Dan Wolner, dwolner@rti-inc.com, related through the Lydia AlmedaCragun line. 39
    • choir.190 JOBS AS YOUTHThere were many jobs for youngsters in those wood and coal-burning days. A first chore for alot of the youngsters was to saw enough cord-wood into stove lengths for both the cooking andheating stoves to last for at least one day, and on Saturdays there had to be for at least enough tolast until after school Monday because there was absolutely no unnecessary work done on the“Lord’s Day”.. Neither was there any outdoor group play with the neighborhood kids who wereallowed to play outside. There were always plenty of quiet games on hand to keep everyonebusy, most of which had probably been brought by Santa, and there was never a shortage ofplayers.Despite the many chores there seemed always time for plenty of wholesome play, much of whichwas of their own invention, but the chores came first and at the exact time they probably had tobe done. RINGLING BROTHERS CIRCUSThe coming of Ringling Brothers circus was of the greatest single event of any summer. Inaddition to being the county seat, Mankato laid claim to being the original home and showingplace. The brothers were products of the country town nearby, St. Clair. After Ringling’s joinedwith Barnum and Bailey they were truly the “greatest show on earth”. The grand parade on themain streets during the forenoon was about all that our family got to see of the circus, until weboys became old enough to work our way for a ticket.Street carnivals and balloon ascensions were next in order of excitement. There were side showsand free attractions such as belly-dancer or snake charmer.191 HORSELESS CARRIAGEA completely new age was upon the world in the form of the horse-less buggy soon after the turnof the century. Here is a description, “While playing down on Second Street one day, we boysheard an unfamiliar noise, soon discovering that one of those contraptions had finally reachedour town for here it was heading for the Byron street one-block long hill. We walked along sideof it as it chugged its way to the top.”With the coming of those machines had to come what was called the good-roads movementbecause it was obvious that gravel would have to be spread over the rich black soil of the roadbeds to make them passable for the few who could afford this new luxury, lest they becomemired if caught out in the country in a downpour of rain. This was to place a heavy tax burdenon the majority who didn’t need it but it soon became the embryo of our vast complex ofmultilane highways of today. WORK EXPERIENCE190 History of Glenn Shoemaker, From: Dan Wolner, dwolner@rti-inc.com, related through the Lydia AlmedaCragun line. Appreciation to Dan for sharing this information with me.191 History of Glenn Shoemaker, From: Dan Wolner, dwolner@rti-inc.com, related through the Lydia AlmedaCragun line. Appreciation to Dan for sharing this information with me. 40
    • James Cass Cragun attended Eureka College in Illinois and then taught school fornineteen years in conjunction with running a small farm near Jordan, Scott County,adding more acreage as he was able. It was necessary for him to get up early enoughin winter to do his barn chores, breakfast, and then walk three miles to school wherehe had to build a fire to heat the one-room school before the pupils arrived. Many abitter cold morning he had to break his own path through drifted snow. Such is only aglimpse of what pioneer life was like.Dollie and Horace were among his pupils when he discontinued teaching to take arural delivery mail route when that service was added to the postal service.192Jordan rural mail carriers with horses and wagons in front of Peoples State Bank, DrugStore, and Post Office in Jordan, Minnesota. L to R – James Cragun, Marshal Darlington, Sylvester Caswell193In 1903 James Cass was found working as a rural postal worker. He was 55 years oldat that time.194 It is unknown when he starting working as a postal worker. He is stilllisted as being a postal worker as his occupation in the 1920 U.S. census. At this timehe was 72 years old.195 LAND RECORDSJames Cass Cragun was found in the Atlas and Farmers Directory of Scott County,Minnesota in 1914 in the city of St. Lawrence. He was 66 years old at this time. Theproperty was on the border of Sand Creek Township in St. Lawrence, Scott County,192 History of Glenn Shoemaker, From: Dan Wolner, dwolner@tti-inc.com, related through Lydia Cragun line.193 Jordan Rural Mail Carriers, www.scottcountyhistory.org, Object: 2000.047.0001, Date: 1903, Jordan, ScottCounty, Minnesota, Searched: James Cragun, Accessed:194 Scott County Historical Society, Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota, Searched: James Cass Cragun, http://www.scottcountyhistory.org/cgi/photosearch, accessed: 26 February 2010195 1920 U.S. census, Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota, www.ancestry.com, accessed: 26 March 2010 41
    • Minnesota. His land was in section 25 and he had 132 acres, his wife was listed asEllen.196 More research is needed to verify if they had more land and where it waslocated. VITAL RECORDSEva Elisabeth (Harris) Cragun died on 28 February 1900 in Jordan, Scott County,Minnesota, according to Eva Cragun Heiner.197 In the Register of Deaths for ScottCounty her name is listed as Eva E. Cragun and her father was a farmer and she wasborn in Wisconsin. At the time of her death her husband was still living.She was 48 years old and she died of consumption (old name for tuberculosisusually attacks the lungs but can also affect other parts of the body.) The name listedfor attending Physician was J.C. Cragun, who was her husband and he was not aphysician. He was the informant, not a physician.198 Her cemetery records list hername as Eva Elizabeth (Harris) Cragun. She was buried at the Spirit Hill Cemeterynext to her husband James Cass Cragun. It is believed that Eva Elizabeth (Harris)Cragun is the correct name and probably Evelyn was a nickname used.199 JamesCragun was buried next to his dear sweet wife. He was born on 3 June 1848 inWhitestown, Boone County, Indiana and he died 18 December 1922 at the age of 74years of age.200James Cass Cragun’s will was probated on 6 February 1923 in Scott County,Minnesota. Unable to locate the record in the film, the note in the film said that thecamera operators think that some of the pages were missed.201196 1914 Atlas and Farmers Directory of Scott County, Minnesota, A Journal of Agriculture, St. Paul Minnesota,www.ancestry.com, accessed:28 March 2010197 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page: 107, (HBLL) book CS71 .C8854 1969, Provo, Utah.198 District Court, Scott County, Minnesota, Death Records, Year: 1900, (FHL) film 1379418, Salt Lake City, Utah.199 Findagrave.com, Virtual Cemetery, Digital images, http://www.findagrave.com, entry for Eva Elizabeth (Harris)Cragun200 Findagrave.com, Virtual Cemetery, Digital images, http://www.findagrave.com, entry for James Cragun, he wasburied on Row 17, lot 202 and grave A.201 Scott County, Minnesota Court House, located in Shakopee, (FHL) film 1439637, Volume F, Page: 462, need toorder the probate record from the Scott County, Minnesota courthouse. 42
    • CHILDREN OF JAMES CASS CRAGUN & EVELYN EVA HARRIS I. Son Cragun was born and died on the same day 2 April 1878 in Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota.202 II. Dolly Ellen Cragun was born on 25 May 1882 in Mankato, Blue Earth, Minnesota, John Henry Jaeger and Dolly Ellen were married on 2 October 1907in Mankato, Blue Earth, Minnesota.203 John Henry Jaeger was born 25 May 1882 in Mankato, Blue Earth,204 In the 1910 U.S. census of Mankato, Blue Earth County, Minnesota, John Jaeger had taken over a small grocery store on South Front Street. Soon after this he brought his new bride Dolly Ellen Cragun, to town and together they operated the store. Dolly’s father James Cragun had remarried after her mother’s death seven year’s prior. Dolly’s younger sister, Lydia who had been her father’s home-maker decided to come to live with her sister Dolly and John Jaeger and help out at the store. The family stayed in Blue Earth until 1910. John Henry’s occupation in 1910 was a butcher; he was 28 years old.205 By 1918 John Henry was working as a farmer with his brother-in-law J. Ward Cragun according to his Draft registration card. He enlisted into World War I on 12 September 1918 in Jordan, Scott County. He was 36 years old at time of enlistment, He was medium height and medium build and his eyes were blue and his hair blond.206 At this time have not been able to find the 1920 census on the family, more search is needed. The family had moved to Minneapolis, Hennepin County by 1930 his occupation was still listed as being a Butcher, according to the 1930 U.S. census.207202 Findagrave.com, Virtual Cemetery, Digital images, http://www.findagrave.com, entry for James Cragun, he wasburied on Row 17, lot 202 and grave A.203 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, (HBLL), CS 71 .C88541969, page 107, Provo, Utah.204 National Archives and Records Administration, World War I Draft Registration Card, Searched: John HenryJaeger, www.ancestry.com, accessed: 25 March 2010205 1910 U.S. census, Mankato, Blue Earth, Minnesota, Searched: John Henry Jaeger, accessed: 25 March 2010206 National Archives and Records Administration, World War I Draft Registration Card, Searched: John HenryJaeger, www.ancestry.com, accessed: 25 March 2010207 1930 U.S. Census, Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota, Searched: John Henry Jaeger, www.ancestry.com,accessed: 26 March 2010 43
    • John died several years before his wife, Dollie Ellen; He passed away on 19 November 1933 in Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota.208 Dollie spent many of her later years living in the “Lone Pine” resort area in Brainerd, Minnesota.209 The resort now is called Cragun’s Resort and Hotel on Gull Lake.210 In the summertime, she would go and stay with her brother Ward and his wife, Ruth. In the colder months of winter, she often went to California to be near her sister, Lydia and her husband, Glenn Shoemaker.211 Dolly was 80 years old at time of her death. She was from Maple Grove Township and a resident for the past 20 years. She died Wednesday morning at Cedarbrook Manor, Deerwood. She was born in Jordan, Minnesota on 15 August 1880. She was a member of the Christian Church, Minneapolis. The funeral was held at the Nelson-Doran Funeral Chapel, the Reverend Robert Kittrell officiated212 and the burial was in the Spirit Hill Cemetery.213 III. Horace Errett Cragun was born 18 September 1883 in Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota.214 He died 5 June 1979 in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota.215 He was buried in the Spirit Hill Cemetery next to his lovely wife Carrie Arnts and his parents James Cass & Eva Cragun.216 Horace married Carrie Lucinda Arnts on 3 November 1909 in Sand Creek, Scott County,Minnesota.217 At the time of their marriage Horace was 26 years and Carrie was 23 years old.218208 Minnesota Department of Health, Minnesota Death Index, 1908-2002, Minneapolis, Hennepin County,searched: John Henry Jaeger, Minnesota, Record No. 656970, Certificate No. 021791, Date: 19 Nov 1933,www.ancestry.com, accessed: 26 March 2010209 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, (HBLL), CS71 .C8854 1969, page 107, Provo, Utah.210 Cragun’s Resort and Hotel on Gull Lake, http://craguns.com/, accessed: 30 March 2010211 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun Descendants in America 1744-1969, Page 105, (HBLL), CS71 .C8854 1969, page 107, Provo, Utah.212 Brainerd Daily Dispatch, Obituary: Dolly Ellen (Cragun) Jaeger, Date: 15 Dec 1960, page: 2, http://newspaperarchive.com/, accessed: 30 March 2010213 Minnesota Department of Health, Minnesota Death Index, 1908-2002, Minneapolis, Hennepin County,searched: Dolly Ellen Jaeger, Minnesota, Record No. 1453515, Certificate No. 003626, Date: 14 Dec 1960,www.ancestry.com, accessed: 26 March 2010214 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun - Descendants in America 1744-1969, (HBLL), CS 71 .C8854 1969, page108, Provo, Utah.215 Minnesota Department of Health, Minnesota Death Index, 1908-2002, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Searched:Horace Errett Cragun, Record No. 1982175, Certificate No. 014886, www.ancestry.com, accessed:216 Minnesota Genealogical Society of Spirit Hill, Scott County, Minnesota, Spirit Hill Cemetery listings, abstract byBetty A. Dols, bdols2570@mac.com, accessed: 11 Feb 2010217 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun - Descendants in America 1744-1969, (HBLL), CS 71 .C8854 1969, page108, Provo, Utah.218 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun - Descendants in America 1744-1969, (HBLL), CS 71 .C8854 1969, page108, Provo, Utah. 44
    • Horace was found in 1895, 1900 and 1905 St. Lawrence, Scott County census with his parents. According to the 1910 census Horace’s occupation was that of a banker and they were living in New Market, Scott County. The distance from Sand Creek and New Market is about 20 miles.219 In the 1917 World War I Draft Registration Cards, Horace Cragun In 220 1920 he still had the occupation of being a banker an Pemberton, Blue Earth. 221 The family moved again in 193 County, Minnesota which is about 175 miles away. At this time they still had three children living at home.222 In 1967 Horace was 87 years old. He amazes everyone with his ability to work in his garden. As Glenn Shoemaker writes that Horace still sells Electrolux cleaners by phone calls mostly and makes regular trips to St. Cloud, Minnesota (80 miles away). “But then,” Glenn says, “he is only 84.” And Carrie, his good wife is the finest and best cook ever. She is such a delightful hostess. Her many friends from everywhere send her the newest in “Cook Books” until she has a book case full of the very oldest to the very newest and the most modern.223 Carrie Lucinda (Arnts) Cragun died on 11 January 1974 in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota at 87 years of age.224 Horace died 5 years later after the death of his dear wife of 70 years. He died on 5 June 1979 in Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota.225 IV. Lydia Almeda Cragun was born 2 April 1887 in Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota, the fourth child of James Cass and Eva Cragun.226 She married219 1910 U.S. Census, New Market, Scott County, Minnesota, www.ancestry.com, Searched: Horace Cragun,accessed: 13 March 2010.220 National Archives and Records Administration, World War I Draft Registration, www.ancestry.com, Searched:Horace Cragun, accessed: 14 March 2010.221 1920 U.S. Census, Pemberton, Blue Earth County, Minnesota, www.ancestry.com, Searched: Horace Cragun, thespelling for the last name was found under Cragen, accessed: 13 March 2010.222 1930 U.S. census, Sandstone, Pine County, Minnesota, www.ancestry.com, Searched: Horace Cragun, accessed:14 March 2010.223 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969, (HBLL) book CS 71 .C8854 1969,page 108, Provo, Utah.224 Minnesota Department of Health, Minnesota Death Index, 1908-2002, Minneapolis, Hennepin County,Minnesota, searched: Carrie Cragun, Certificate No. 000587, death date: 11 January 1974225 Minnesota Department of Health, Minnesota Death Index, 1908-2002, Minneapolis, Hennepin County,Minnesota, searched: Horace Errett Cragun, Certificate No. 014886, Record No. 1982175, accessed: 26 March 2010226 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun - Descendants in America 1744-1969, (HBLL), CS 71 .C8854 1969, page109, Provo, Utah. 45
    • Glenn Shoemaker 31 August 1911in Mankato, Blue Earth County, Minnesota.227 Glenn died 21 August 1977 in Los Angeles, California at the age of 88 years.228 His dear sweet wife of 66 years died 10 August 1981 in Los Angeles, California at the age of 94 years.229 In 1918 Glenn Shoemaker signed up for the World War 1 draft at the age of 29 years old. He was married with 4 children at this time and his occupation when he registered was that of a mail carrier in Mankato, Minnesota.230 The family was found living in Mankato, Blue Earth County in 1920 and 1930 according to the census.231 The 1920 census shows that he had 4 children. His occupation was listed as a mail clerk in the 1930 U.S. census and he was 41 years old. In the 1936-1941 city directory of Blue Earth, Glenn’s occupation is listed as a clerk. The couple was living at the same address.232 We know that they moved to California before 1952 as Glenn got his social security number in 1952.233 Lydia was a fine musician; she often played for her husband Glenn, who had an exceptionally fine voice and enjoyed singing for church, funeral and civic affairs. Lydia moved in with her sister Dolly after her father James Cass Cragun remarried; he married his sister-in-law Ellen Harris. Dolly and Lydia placed their membership in the church that Glenn Shoemaker was attending. Lydia and her Dolly and John Jaeger attended church regularly and it was the job of Glenn Shoemaker as the usher to seat everyone. Glenn writes that “They were sort of nifty girls. I thought, as farm girls can be and decidedly of the Irish colleen type.” Lydia won the eye of Glenn Shoemaker at first sight, as much as he wanted to meet her, he was to shy. Glenn’s mother had attended a Ladies Aid meeting about this time and at the supper table that evening said “Glenn I’ve found a nice girl for you.” His mother was apparently well impressed with Lydia. Glenn Shoemaker and Lydia Almeda Cragun227 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun - Descendants in America 1744-1969, (HBLL), CS 71 .C8854 1969, page109, Provo, Utah.228 California Department of Health Services, Center for Health Statistics, California Death Index, 1940-1997, Los Angeles, California, Searched: Glenn Shoemaker, www.ancestry.com, accessed: 26 March2010229 California Department of Health Services, Center for Health Statistics, California Death Index, 1940-1997,Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, Searched: Lydia Almeda Shoemaker, death date: 10 August 1981,www.ancestry.com, accessed: 26 March 2010230 National Archives and records administration, World War I Draft registration card, Searched: Glenn Shoemaker,www.ancestry.com, accessed: 26 March 2010.231 1920 -1930 U.S. census, Mankato, Blue Earth County, Minnesota, Searched: Glenn Shoemaker,www.ancestry.com, accessed: 26 March 2010.232 U.S. City Directories, R.L. Polk and Co’s Mankato City and Blue Earth County, Year: 1936, 1938,1941,1945,1950, Searched: Glenn Shoemaker, Mankato, Minnesota, accessed: 31 Jan 2010233 Social Security Death Index, Social Security No. 562-46-4548, Date issued was 1952. 46
    • Lydia’s sister Dolly (Cragun) Jaeger planned a party at her home to introduce her sister to the young people of the area; this is how she met Glenn. It was not long until it was Glenn who was seeing her home after evening services and their attraction blossomed rapidly. Finances were very tight in the beginning of their relationship; even going to a movie was hard for them. After a year of courtship Glenn told his mother that he would like to marry Lydia Cragun and would like to marry in about a year, Glenn started saving money so that the young couple could get married. Glenn had taken the Post office exam and had received an appointment as a regular clerk to begin July 1910. He had served as an extra through the Christmas rush of 1909. He was on a $50.00 per month salary the first year and out of this was able to save $150 by the time of marriage. The marriage was quite a family wedding and was solemnized at the little back-of-the-store apartment of the Jaegers, at 3 p.m. 31 August 1911.234 V. James Ward Cragun was born 11 July 1890 in Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota. On 1 June 1916 in Mankato, Blue Earth County, Minnesota he married his sweetheart Ruth Alice Shoemaker.235 James died 29 May 1967 in Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota.236 James Ward signed up for the World War I draft on 5 June 1917 in Mankato, Minnesota. At the time of the signing he was married with 4 children and his occupation was a postal worker.237 He was born on the family farm home near Jordan, Scott County, Minnesota on 11 July 1890, and the youngest of four children. He helped his father, they then rented from his father, after he had tried homesteading in Alberta, Canada. Ward was married to Ruth Alice Shoemaker in Mankato, Minnesota, 1 June 1916. Two children were born to this blessed union. Following the terrible influenza epidemic of 1918, Ward developed a heart leakage and the doctor advised leaving the farm for lighter work. Summer resorts were coming into great popularity in Minnesota which appealed to him and he found the place of his dreams on South Long Lake near Brainerd, Minnesota.234 History of Glenn Shoemaker, From Dan Wolner, dwolner@rti-inc.com related through the Lydia AlmedaCragun line, Appreciation to Dan for sharing this information. For more information in the history is available.235 Patrick Cragun - Descendants in America 1744-1969, (HBLL), CS 71 .C8854 1969, page 109, Provo, Utah.236 Minnesota Department of Health, Minnesota Death Index, 1908-2002, Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota,searched: James Ward Cragun, State File No. 011279, Record No. 1673464, www.ancestry.com,237 National Archives and Records Administration, World War I Draft Registration Card, Searched: John WardCragun, www.ancestry.com, accessed: 25 March 2010 47
    • James Ward Cragun was living in St. Lawrence, Scott County, Minnesota in 1920 and was married at this time his occupation was a farmer.238 A little confused because the census lists Fred Sanders and his stepson and that Fred was 14 years old and at this time Ward was 29 years old and his wife was 24 years old, more research is needed to clarify this question. Who was Fred Sanders? And why was he listed as a stepson? In September of 1923 an auction sale disposed of farming equipment and Ward and Ruth and their two young children moved north. He was a very energetic man and for many years ran the “Lone Pine Resort” at Brainerd, Minnesota, until ill health forced him to retire. He was a Mason. His good wife, Ruth, was ever concerned with his welfare. The resort proved a successful venture. Many lasting friendships were made.239 In 1930 census James is listed with his wife and two children at this time he was 39 years old and his wife was 34 years old. They have two children listed Maurice and Betty.240 Ruth hosted various Ladies Aid Society functions at her house in 1935.241 Starting in 1937 the family was listed in the Crow Wing County, Minnesota directory, the family was listed in various other directories living in the same area.242 J.W. Cragun started a resort in South Long Lake near Brainerd, Minnesota in Crow Wing County that offers 2,115 acres of scenic beauty with a shoreline surrounded by rolling hills covered with towering pines. Year round recreational water activities and close proximity to a wide variety of attractions make this lake a premier vacation destination. Lone Pine Resort on South Long Lake, owned and operated by Mr. and Mrs. J. Ward Cragun for 37 years in 1961, was sold to a nephew, James W. Cragun of Niagara Falls243238 1920 U.S. Census of St. Lawrence, Scott County, Minnesota, Searched: James Ward Cragun,www.ancestry.com, accessed: 26 March 2010239 Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969 (HBLL) book CS 71 .C8854 1969,Provo, Utah.,240 1930 U.S. Census of St. Lawrence, Scott County, Minnesota, Searched: James Ward Cragun,www.ancestry.com, accessed: 26 March 2010241 Brainerd Daily Dispatch, Society Page: 7 and 8 January 1935, Page 3, Mrs. J.W. Cragun, http://newspaperarchive.com/, accessed: 6 April 2010.242 U.S. City Directories, R.L. Polk and Co’s, 1937, 1939, 1942, 1946, 1949, Crow Wing County, Minnesota,Searched: J.W. Cragun, www.ancestry.com, accessed: 6 April 2010243 Brainerd Daily Dispatch, Society Page: Lone Pine Resort sold by Craguns, Searched: J.W. Cragun, http://newspaperarchive.com/, accessed: 6 April 2010. 48
    • Ward’s health was failing after a very serious operation in September 1959. He bought the Canniff property and they built lovely new home not far from the resort on the lake-shore.244 FUTURE RESEARCH 1. Order pension file for Enoch and Nephi Cragun, also order Jacob Habegger’s pension file244Eva Cragun Heiner, Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969 (HBLL) book CS 71 .C8854 1969,Provo, Utah., 49
    • 2. Order pension for Enoch Davis Cragun’s wife Penninah Cragun who outlived her husband3. Tract book, Boone County, Indiana – compiled by Rosemary Peterman – has description of land, ownership etc. and it may show information on Elisha Cragun, FHL book – 977 .254 R284. Civil Order Books, Circuit Court, Boone County, Indiana – Elisha Cragun is listed as being on page 120 (FHL film 241868 No. 1)5. Complete Civil order books – Elisha Cragun – FHL film 2418840 #2, page 120 - (Grand jurors for October term 1837) also found on page 122 (October 16, 1837 Grand Jurors) FHL film 24188416. Marriage record for Enoch D. Cragun and Penninah Davis – extracted, FHL film 13092757. Death record for Jonathon O.Q. Cragun – Year 1936 for Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota FHL film 22423788. Look for the Deed books for Scott County, Minnesota and see if anything is listed for Enoch Cragun9. Hiram Cragun and Reiter Dooley marriage record – they were married 18 August 1842 in Boone County, Indiana – FHL film 132011010. According to the Indiana Works Progress the death record for Reiter Bowers (Cragun) can be found in book R-23 on page 711. Marriage record for Enoch Cragun and Mary (Molly) Peters – they were married on 5 May 1842 in Whitestown, Boone County, Indiana.12. Marriage record of James Cass Cragun to Ellen Harris the sister of his first wife Evelyn Harris – it is believed that they got married about 1908 as they were listed as being married in the 1910 census for Scott County, Minnesota.13. Marriage record of Elisha Cragun and Mary Osborn – can be found in Cass County, Indiana Marriage book 3, page 296 and in the Deed Book 4 page 611 in the Lebanon, Boone County courthouse records.14. Tennessee soldiers in the War of 1812 – FHL book 976 .8 A1 – look for Elisha Cragun; also look for the book by Jill Knight Garret for Maury County, Tennessee. FHL book 976 .859 ME.15. From the book Patrick Cragun – Descendants in America 1744-1969, on page 31 says that Elisha was serving under Jackson at New Orleans during the War 50
    • of 1812. More research was done to determine if Jackson was involved with the Tennessee militia and he was, it is believed that further research in the records may help to find information that Elisha served with Jackson. Andrew Jackson, Major General of the Tennessee militia, was outfitted in December 1812.16. One book to look at that may lead in the direction to go is the book Tennesseans in the War of 1812 by Byron Sistler, (FHL) book 976.8 M2217. More research is needed to find the tax and land records for Elisha18. Look for court and Church records concerning Elisha and his family. 51