Home Energy
Solutions
Larissa Pierce
Pacific University
Sustainable Design ‘14
My Project
Collecting information about various alternate energy
producing systems that can be effectively implemented for...
My Reasoning
• Modern infrastructure and home design inefficient, tract
houses and basic homes often are designed without
...
The Systems
• Alternate energy sources
• Wind: small wind turbines
• Geothermal: geothermal heat pumps, HVAC
• Solar: phot...
• The typical U.S. home uses…
• 903 kWh of electricity per month
• 10,837 kWh for the year 2012
Energy Consumption Average...
Wind
There are many wind turbines available to meet the assist the
average Oregonian in producing energy.
Model Cost Start...
Raw map data retrieved from http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/data_resources.html Displayed using Arc GIS software
Wind
Data displayed on the Oregon map above shows the break
down of wind speeds at 10 meters. The areas that range from
bl...
Geothermal
A geothermal heat pump moves heat energy from within the
Earth’s crust to provide space conditioning. A geother...
Raw map data retrieved from http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/data_resources.html Displayed using Arc GIS software
Geothermal
Areas shown in red are better suited for HVAC systems due to
ground temperature at shallower depths, more easil...
Solar
• Lower utility bills:
Energy collected on your
room is directed straight to
your outlets.
• Higher home value:
Home...
Solar in Oregon?
Clear days a year
• 126 Sexton Summit
• 68 Portland
• 50 Astoria
Solar panels still do their job even und...
Oregon Solar
Clear days per year
Least (50)
Most (126)
Raw map data retrieved from http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/data_resou...
Solar Options
Model Cost per
Panel
Price per
Watt
Maximum
Wattage
Solar
Efficiency
Kyocera
KD315GX-LPB
$375 $1.19 315 watt...
A Piece of the Problem
A 2012 study discovered homes constructed in the 1980s consumed 77
million Btu of energy annually. ...
New Homes
Passive solar is achieved through properly-oriented, south-facing
windows combined with areas of thermal mass to...
Sources
“AgriMet Network Map.” Reclamation. U.S. Department of the Interior, Web. 14 Dec. 2013.
<http://www.usbr.gov/pn/ag...
Pappas, Stephanie . “Best Solar Panels 2014.” Livescience. N.p., 6 Dec. 2013. Web. 9 Dec. 2013.
<http://www.livescience.co...
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Oregon Home Energy Solutions

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The world has grown accustomed to utilizing power as if coal, oil, and other fuels are inexhaustible. In recent years advancements in technology have produced means by which individual homes can generate their own energy using renewable natural resources. Systems that utilize wind, solar, and geothermal energy to produce electricity are available for those who decide to make the change from conventionally produced power to supply their own. I have compiled data on these various power sources and paired them to climates across Oregon in order to discover which systems would be most suited for implementation in any given area. Using Arc GIS mapping software I created three layers of data for Oregon that show the areas ripe for implementation of the various energy systems. My calculations comparing wind speed, geothermal heat, and solar hours per day will assist homeowners in determining which system will be the most effective, appropriate, and give them an estimate of how long each system will require to pay for itself based on the conditions of their region. This will give conscientious Oregonians a resource for choosing the most beneficial environmental solution to produce their own power. By making this resource accessible my hope is that the change from unsustainable fuels will hasten to methods of energy production that are self sustaining and specific to individual homes. This will help Oregonians become less dependent on the power created by coal and fossil fuels and begin the advancement to renewable energy sources at the home scale.

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Oregon Home Energy Solutions

  1. 1. Home Energy Solutions Larissa Pierce Pacific University Sustainable Design ‘14
  2. 2. My Project Collecting information about various alternate energy producing systems that can be effectively implemented for use in Oregon. • Implementation in remodels or as retrofits • New structure implementation
  3. 3. My Reasoning • Modern infrastructure and home design inefficient, tract houses and basic homes often are designed without consideration for their surroundings • There is an abundance of natural power sources that can easily be tapped into on the small scale regionally • More people are becoming conscientious about their resource use and are moving toward environmental solutions • Little information is available providing insight to what methods are most productive and/or efficient within specific regions
  4. 4. The Systems • Alternate energy sources • Wind: small wind turbines • Geothermal: geothermal heat pumps, HVAC • Solar: photovoltaic panels & proper house design/layout
  5. 5. • The typical U.S. home uses… • 903 kWh of electricity per month • 10,837 kWh for the year 2012 Energy Consumption Averages • The typical home in Oregon uses… • 957 kWh of electricity per month • ~$95 a month hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh hhhhhhhhhhh Image retrieved from http://www.eia.gov
  6. 6. Wind There are many wind turbines available to meet the assist the average Oregonian in producing energy. Model Cost Startup Speed Estimated Energy Production per month Percent of average monthly electricity Period of time for system to pay for itself at start up speed Xzeres Skystream 3.7 $5,399 8mph 256 kWh 26.8% 18 years Southwest Windpower Air X $600 8mph 192 kWh 20.1% 2 years 8 months Bergey Excel $27,900 7.5mph 900 kWh 94.0% 26 years 4 months Southwest Windpower Whisper 500 $7,095 7.5mph 300 kWh 31.3% 20 years 1 month Turbine raw data retrieved from http://cleantechnica.com/2008/03/21/the-five-best-micro-wind-turbines/>. Calculations derived from raw data. System pay off time does not include incentives and is base on 9.8cents per kWh.
  7. 7. Raw map data retrieved from http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/data_resources.html Displayed using Arc GIS software
  8. 8. Wind Data displayed on the Oregon map above shows the break down of wind speeds at 10 meters. The areas that range from blue to red are areas where small wind is most efficient. Areas below 9.8mph (grey) may produce enough wind to generate electricity but not consistently throughout the year. • To view Oregon’s Small Wind Guidebook visit: http://en.openei.org/wiki/Oregon/Wind_Resources • To learn more about specific county restrictions visit: http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=3&ved=0CDc QFjAC&url=http%3A%2F%2Fenergytrust.org%2Flibrary%2Fforms%2FSMW_DOC_Small_Wind_P ermitting_Requirements.xlsx&ei=ALVWU_6eJKGSyQHvkYH4DQ&usg=AFQjCNE1n1qcoB792ah3 CDZn7tlMUobeHw • For information on tax credits and incentives visit: http://www.oregon.gov/energy/CONS/RES/tax/docs/oar-retc.pdf http://www.oregon.gov/energy/RENEW/Pages/wind/windinfo.aspx#small
  9. 9. Geothermal A geothermal heat pump moves heat energy from within the Earth’s crust to provide space conditioning. A geothermal HVAC (Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning) system can provide heating, ventilation, cooling, and humidity control eliminating the need of other indoor climate systems. In addition to air, a desuperheater can be added to heat household water. Images retrieved from http://www.alternative-energies.net/geothermal-energy-systems-and-the-heat- that-comes-from-earth/
  10. 10. Raw map data retrieved from http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/data_resources.html Displayed using Arc GIS software
  11. 11. Geothermal Areas shown in red are better suited for HVAC systems due to ground temperature at shallower depths, more easily penetrable soil, or quality of soil insulation. • According to the EPA, use of this technology can reduce energy consumption and emissions up to 44% compared to an air- source heat pump, or up to 72% compared to electric resistance heating and air-conditioning equipment • Geothermal heat pumps remove four times more kWh of consumption from the electrical grid per dollar than photovoltaic and wind power add to the electrical grid • $7,500 for system: piping, digging , etc additional making cost variable by area • For information on incentives and systems permitted in Oregon visit: http://www.oregon.gov/energy/RENEW/Geothermal/Pages/GSHP.aspx
  12. 12. Solar • Lower utility bills: Energy collected on your room is directed straight to your outlets. • Higher home value: Homes on the market with installed solar sell for more than those without. • Control: Solar technology is becoming more efficient and less expensive each year. Installing solar will keep you from having to pay more to the power company as electricity prices continue to climb. Image retrieved from http://www.greenmountain.com/
  13. 13. Solar in Oregon? Clear days a year • 126 Sexton Summit • 68 Portland • 50 Astoria Solar panels still do their job even under the cloud cover, just at a reduced rate. In order to calculate the number of panels needed and how long it will take to recoup cost visit: http://pvwatts.nrel.gov/ For incentives visit: http://www.oregon.gov/energy/RENEW/Pages/solar/Support-RETC.aspx
  14. 14. Oregon Solar Clear days per year Least (50) Most (126) Raw map data retrieved from http://www.nrel.gov/analysis/data_resources.html Displayed using Arc GIS software
  15. 15. Solar Options Model Cost per Panel Price per Watt Maximum Wattage Solar Efficiency Kyocera KD315GX-LPB $375 $1.19 315 watts 16% Canadian Solar CS6X-305M $298 $0.97 305 watts 15.9% Grape Solar 390W $474 $1.21 390 watts 15.21% Suntech STP255 S-20/Wdb $260 $1.01 255 watts 15.7% Panel data retrieved from http://solar-panels-review.toptenreviews.com.html A few examples of the 2014 most highly rated roof top solar panels options available for home or private structure use. When choosing solar panels be sure to take into account the durability if you experience heavy snowfall of wind storms that move debris.
  16. 16. A Piece of the Problem A 2012 study discovered homes constructed in the 1980s consumed 77 million Btu of energy annually. In comparison, homes built from 2000 to 2009 consumed 92 million Btu: a 19% increase. Image retrieved from http://www.e3innovate.com/news/2013/09/05/infographic-how-energy-codes-make-homes-more- energy-efficient
  17. 17. New Homes Passive solar is achieved through properly-oriented, south-facing windows combined with areas of thermal mass to retain heat. Unlike many active solar heating systems passive solar does not have a high initial cost or long-term payback period. Passive solar utilizing buildings can reduce heating energy use by 25% to 75% compared to a typical structure while remaining cost-effective on a life-cycle basis. Image retrieved from http://morningstarfishermen.org/2013/03 /28/what-is-passive-solar-why-use-it/ For more information on passive solar visit: http://passivesolar.sustainable sources.com/
  18. 18. Sources “AgriMet Network Map.” Reclamation. U.S. Department of the Interior, Web. 14 Dec. 2013. <http://www.usbr.gov/pn/agrimet/agrimetmap/agrimap.html>. “Benefits of Solar Power.” Solar America. N.p., Web. 6 Nov. 2013. <http://www.solaramerica.org/solar-energy-facts/benefits-of-solar-power/>. “Choosing and Installing Geothermal Heat Pumps.” Energy.gov. Office of Energy Efficiency, 24 June 2012. Web. 16 Nov. 2013. <http://energy.gov/energysaver/articles/choosing-and-installing- geothermal-heat-pumps>. “Do Solar Panels Work When It's Cloudy?.” Sun Farmers. N.p., 2010. Web. 9 Jan. 2014. <http://www.sunfarmers.com/do-solar-panels-work-when-its-cloudy>. “Fact Sheet: Small Scale Wind Power for Homes, Farms and Communities.” Environmental and Energy Study Institute. Earth Share, 5 July 2012. Web. 22 Nov. 2013. <http://www.eesi.org/fact- sheet-small-scale-wind-power-homes-farms-and-communities-05-jul-2012>. “Geothermal Energy.” Oregon.gov. N.p., Web. 16 Nov. 2013. <http://www.oregon.gov/ENERGY/RENEW/Geothermal/Pages/GSHP.aspx>. “Geothermal Heat Pumps.” Energy.gov. Office of Energy Efficiency, 24 June 2012. Web. 14 Jan. 2014. <http://energy.gov/energysaver/articles/geothermal-heat-pumps>. “Help for Homeowners.” Energy Trust of Oregon. Web. 14 Dec. 2013. <http://energytrust.org/residential/homeowners/>. Howard, Brian C. “Ten Myths About Geothermal Heating and Cooling.” National Geographic. N.p., 2013. Web. 17 Nov. 2013. <http://energyblog.nationalgeographic.com/2013/09/17/10-myths-about- geothermal-heating-and-cooling/>. Hurst, Timothy B. “Top Five Micro Wind Turbines.” Clean Technica. LiveOAK Media, 21 Mar. 2018. Web. 9 Jan. 2013. <http://cleantechnica.com/2008/03/21/the-five-best-micro-wind-turbines/>.
  19. 19. Pappas, Stephanie . “Best Solar Panels 2014.” Livescience. N.p., 6 Dec. 2013. Web. 9 Dec. 2013. <http://www.livescience.com/41747-best-solar-panels.html>. “Planning a Small Wind Project.” Windustry. N.p., 2014. Web. 12 Jan. 2014. <http://www.windustry.org/home-and-farm-scale-wind/planning-small-wind-project>. “PVWatts- Grid Data Calculator.” NREL. National Renewable Energy Labratory, 31 Mar. 2014. Web. 1 Apr. 2014. <http://www.nrel.gov/rredc/pvwatts/grid.html>. “Small Wind Electric Systems.” Energy.gov. Office of Energy Efficiency, 15 July 2012. Web. 14 Jan. 2014. <http://energy.gov/energysaver/articles/small-wind-electric-systems>. “Small Wind.” American Wind Energy Association. N.p., 2013. Web. 13 Apr. 2013. <http://www.awea.org/Issues/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=4592&navItemNumber=723>. “Solar.” Energy.gov. Office of Energy Efficiency, 2013. Web. 14 Jan. 2014. <http://energy.gov/eere/renewables/solar>. “The benefits of wind turbines.” Wind Turbines For Homes Explained. Energy Savings Trust, 2014. Web. 12 Jan. 2014. <http://www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/Generating-energy/Choosing-a- renewable-technology/Wind-turbines>. Thomson, Linda. “Solar Reviews.” TopTenReviews. 26 Mar. 2014. Web. 28 Mar. 2014. <http://solar- panels-review.toptenreviews.com/grape-solar-390w-review.html?cmpid=ttr-ls>. Wholesale Solar. N.p., 2013. Web. 9 Jan. 2014. <http://www.wholesalesolar.com/solar-panels.html>. “Wind Energy Stakeholder Engagement & Outreach.” OpenEI. American Wind Energy Assoc. & Distributed Wind Energy Assoc., Web. 14 Dec. 2013. <http://en.openei.org/wiki/Oregon/Wind_Resources>. Sources

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