Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
REPORT OF THE IPCC AR5 STRATEGY CATALYST WORKSHOP IN NIGERIA
REPORT OF THE IPCC AR5 STRATEGY CATALYST WORKSHOP IN NIGERIA
REPORT OF THE IPCC AR5 STRATEGY CATALYST WORKSHOP IN NIGERIA
REPORT OF THE IPCC AR5 STRATEGY CATALYST WORKSHOP IN NIGERIA
REPORT OF THE IPCC AR5 STRATEGY CATALYST WORKSHOP IN NIGERIA
REPORT OF THE IPCC AR5 STRATEGY CATALYST WORKSHOP IN NIGERIA
REPORT OF THE IPCC AR5 STRATEGY CATALYST WORKSHOP IN NIGERIA
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

REPORT OF THE IPCC AR5 STRATEGY CATALYST WORKSHOP IN NIGERIA

396

Published on

The National Strategy Catalyst Workshop on the IPCC 5th Assessment Report (AR5) was held in Abuja, Nigeria on the 14th January 2014 by the Global Call for Climate Action (GCCA), Climate Action Network …

The National Strategy Catalyst Workshop on the IPCC 5th Assessment Report (AR5) was held in Abuja, Nigeria on the 14th January 2014 by the Global Call for Climate Action (GCCA), Climate Action Network International (CAN), Youth Vision Alliance Network (YVAN), Heinrich Boell Foundation Nigeria and other leading Nigeria environmental organisations.

The workshop was organised against the backdrop of the AR5 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to help environmental organisations in Nigeria effective communicate the tenet of the report to the populace. The workshop brought together about 28 leading climate change activists, researchers and government officials together from the six geopolitical zones of the country.

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
396
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. REPORT OF THE IPCC AR5 STRATEGY CATALYST WORKSHOP IN NIGERIA Table of Contents Background. ..........................................................................................................................................................2 Opening:................................................................................................................................................................3 Introductions/Remarks: ........................................................................................................................................3 The State of the Climate Politics and the Science.................................................................................................3 Global perspective of IPCC AR5, including look back at IPCC AR4: Hans Verolme ...............................................3 IPCC AR5 and the National realities in Nigeria- Prof. Emmanuel Oladipo ............................................................4 Advocacy Strategy Development ( Issues) ............................................................................................................4 Table 1. Identified actionable goals for political will and cc information .............................................................5 Strategy development-Power mapping ................................................................................................................5 Table 2: Influencers and possible influence..........................................................................................................6 Strategy development: Messaging........................................................................................................................6 Organizational action plans...................................................................................................................................6 Closing: ..................................................................................................................................................................7
  • 2. REPORT OF THE IPCC STRATEGY CATALYST WORKSHOP IN NIGERIA HELD ON MONDAY, JANUARY 20 2014 AT HEINRICH BOLL CONFERENCE HALL, RUKAYYAT PLAZA, BESIDE JABI MOTOR PARK, JABI ABUJA, ORGANISED BY GLOBAL CALL FOR CLIMATE ACTION (GCCA) AND CLIMATE ACTION NETWORK INTERNATIONAL (CAN-I) IN COLLABORATION WITH THE NIGERIAN ORGANISING TEAM: HEINRICH BOELL STIFTUNG NIGERIA (HBS Nigeria) CLIMATE CHANGE NETWORK NIGERIA (CCN-Nigeria) AFRICA YOUTH INITIATIVE ON CLIMATE CHANGE (AYICC) NIGERIA YOUTH CLIMATE COALITION (NYCC) YOUTH VISION ALLIANCE NETWORK (YVAN) Background Climate change presents an unprecedented challenge for global existence, economic development, as well as peace and security. Extreme climatic conditions have become common. In 1988, the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) established the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to review and assess climatic science reports in an objective manner to understand the scientific basis of danger of human-caused climate change, possible impacts and available options for adaptation and mitigation. Right from inception, the IPCC has produced four different reports which have constituted effective advocacy tools for climate policy and political decision making. The IPCC reports have also achieved far reaching milestones. The Fourth Assessment Report smothered the controversy that had hitherto characterized the role of humans in recent climatic changes. The report also activated enormous interest of so many political heads across the globe on climate change issues. The Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) which will be published in four installments between 2013 and 2014 had the Working Group 1 “Physical Science of Climate Change” published on September 27, 2013 Stockholm. The Reports for Working Group 2 (Impacts, Vulnerability and Adaptation) and Working Group 3 (Mitigation) will be published on 25-29 March 2014 in Yokohama, Japan and 7-11 April 2014 in Berlin, Germany respectively. Then the IPCC Synthesis Report will follow suit 27-31 October IN Copenhagen, Denmark. The report of the Working Group 1 of the Fifth Assessment Report provides some alarming scenarios if actions are not taken. The Report showed with virtual certainty that climate change is real and caused by human activity and requires urgent action. Sea level rise has accelerated, rising almost twice as fast as from 1993 to 2010 than it did from 1901 to 2010. Oceans are greatly acidifying posing a dangerous dimension to economic development and growth. There is therefore an urgent need and desire for countries to take necessary actions in mitigation and adaptation efforts in combating climate change. CAN International and the GCCA in collaboration with Herinrich Boell Foundation, Climate Change Network, Nigerian Youth Climate Coalition, Africa Youth Initiative on Climate Change and the Youth Vision Alliance Network held this workshop as a catalyst for developing advocacy strategy for a collaborative effort between different civil society groups and activists working on promote climate actions and leveraging AR5 at the national level.
  • 3. Opening: The meeting commenced with a Prayer followed by the National anthem. Introductions/Remarks: Participants introduced themselves and Surveyor Efik gave a brief overview on the objective of the workshop as a strategic meeting to support climate activists in Nigeria to push for a policy debate and advocacy around the Fifth Assessment Report of the intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (AR5). Christine K, Country Director, Heinrich Boell wished the workshop good luck. The State of the Climate Politics and the Science Global perspective of IPCC AR5, including look back at IPCC AR4: Hans Verolme He gave an overview of the IPCC role to access on a holistic, objective, open and transparent manner the socio-economic, technical and scientific information relevant to the understanding of the scientific basis of risk of human induced climate change, potential impacts and options for mitigation and adaptation. He informed that governments are actively involved in the review and can comment on draft and invite expert authors. He however maintained that good advocates do not wait for invitation but prepare specific recommendations in response to the IPCC assessment and lobby for their adoption. He mentioned the following as being activated by the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4): I. II. It settled the central question of the roles human actions played in creating the climatic changes recently observed. It increased the political impetus that hitherto have been building and which pushed climate change upwards on policy agenda of many countries. The Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) that will be published between September 2013 and October 2014 is divided into 3 Working Groups (WGs). WG 1 deals with the physical science. Working Group 2 works on climate change impacts, adaptation and vulnerability. Working Group 3 works on mitigation. Each working group report includes a 30-page Summary for Policy-Makers (SPM). Already the SPM of Working Group has been released in September 27, 2013 in Stockholm, Sweden. The SPM showed that climate change is real, caused by human actions and requires urgent action. Sea levels are rising, precipitation are changing, sea ice declining and oceans acidifying. The SPM for Working Group 2 will be released in Yokohama, Japan in March, 2014. It remains a draft, inputs could still be made and it could change before its release in March. However, the current draft reveals that the climate change has the capacity to threaten world’s food supply, serious impact on human health and economic future, hence compelling argument for joint and rapid actions to address climate change. The SPM 3 for Working Group 3 is due for launch in Berlin, Germany, April, 2014. It is the analysis of policies to reduce emissions in the energy, transport, building and infrastructure, industry and the agricultural sector. IPCC’s usage of Representative Concentration Pathway1 beyond emission scenarios is a major difference with the Fourth Assessment Report. 1 Representative Concentration Pathways are four greenhouse gases concentration (not emissions) trajectories. They describe four possible climate futures, all of which are considered possible depending on how much greenhouse gases are emitted in the years to come.
  • 4. IPCC AR5 and the National realities in Nigeria- Prof. Emmanuel Oladipo This presentation highlighted several messages to halt the global temperature rise. The World Bank 2012 Report (Turn off the Heat), China and the G77 pressing for maximum of 1.5C warming. The paper also reviews some of the IPCC AR5 findings for East and West Africa across sectors to include the following: a. Increase of 0.8-1 degree Celsius over most of East Africa, more variable but 0.2 to 2.5°C for West Africa. b. Increase in the number of tropical2 nights to between 90 and 100 days, with coastal areas being slightly cooler, and more tropical nights in East Africa. c. Increase in cloudiness and humidity in East Africa; decrease in West Africa. d. Increased drought and water stress due to precipitation declines during the already dry season. e. Increased water pollution and water-borne diseases due to warmer temperatures and increased precipitation intensity. f. Agricultural losses of between 2 to 4% GDP for western Africa by 2100 g. Increase of 25 to 90% in proportion of the population undernourished with a 1.2-1.9°C warming. h. Increase of 5-8% of the proportion of arid and semi-arid lands in Africa is projected by the 2080s. i. Losses of 5-10% of gross domestic product (GDP) due to sea-level rise with adaptation; losses up to 14% GDP without adaptation. j. Increased salinization and reduced freshwater availability along coasts He highlighted the vulnerability of Nigeria to climate change as alarming. Nigeria may lose a GDP of between 6% and 30% by 2050. By 2020, if no adaptation is implemented, between 2-11% of our GDP could potentially be lost, and the 0.5m rate of sea rise could lead to the loss of 35% of the Niger Delta and if the sea rise gets up to 1%, 70% of the Niger Delta will be under water. Agricultural productivity could decline between 10% and 25% by 2080. The presentation also highlighted the vulnerability of Nigeria in biodiversity loss and could activate the deterioration in land cover and the aggravation of the already precarious erosion of the South Eastern states. In the water sector, the paper noted that climate change can alter the hydro-climatological systems of the different ecological zones in the country, with their consequences on the availability of water resources as exemplified by the shrinking of the Lake Chad. It may also increase Nigeria’s dependency on groundwater resources in some areas of reduced rainfall which could heighten water induced crisis, especially in the North. Advocacy Strategy Development (Issues) Problem identification: Participants were asked to identify the problems that have militated and/or could affect effective mobilization against climate change in Nigeria. Participants identified so many issues and the following were grouped from the cluster: a. b. c. d. e. 2 Lack of political will Dearth of research on climate change Inadequate information on climate change issues Lack of definite strategy Paucity of funds to mobilize stakeholders to action and activate government intervention. That is the number of 24-hour days above 20°C
  • 5. Group discussion: Participants were divided into 4 groups with 2 groups to work on 5 actionable goals on knowledge development to boost climate change information while the other 2 groups will work on the 5 actionable goals of activating political will. Table 1. Identified actionable goals for political will and cc information Most compelling actionable goals to increase CC information. Identify all stakeholders on climate change in Nigeria. Most compelling actionable goals to activate political will. Strengthen the focal point of climate change in government institution(s) for effective advocacy. Strengthen capacities institutions and Build capacities of stakeholders. establish legislative frameworks. Sensitization of the populace through local Increase community sensitization and mobilization to stimulate government to media, and other new media platforms. action. Advocate and mainstream gender issues Engage the legislature and build their into climate change and embark on massive capacity. information dissemination. Train and retrain policy makers on climate Sensitize and lobby decision makers. change issues. Employ the right language, translate and Treat climate change as a development issue. breaking down into simpler languages. Active engagement of the media to put in public domain all information available on climate change. Mainstream climate change into educational curriculum. Encourage more media engagement with policy makers. Policy advocacy government. by responsible Increased partnership with governments Emphasize and establish the nexus between climate change, environment and energy. and all necessary stakeholders Employ the least variable in disseminating climate change issues Strategy development-Power mapping In order to be more effective it was necessary to describe and analyze political forces in Nigeria around the actionable objectives. Participants were asked to do one on one interview of these political forces and their impact to ascertain if positive or negative impact.
  • 6. Table 2: Influencers and possible influence Force Federal Ministry of Environment Dangote Plc President of Nigeria The National Assembly First Ladies Federal Ministry of Finance National Planning Commission Traditional/religious leaders Grassroots women groups Impact ( Positive) Positive positive Positive Positive Positive Positive Positive Positive Positive (Negative) Negative Negative Negative Brainstorming and gathering potential actions: Participants were given 20 minutes to brainstorm on potential actions that could possibly be embarked to tackle climate change in Nigeria. The following actions were identified as quick areas of intervention: a. Create a mobile and web application portal that will educate people climate change related issues. b. Form a network of Civil Society Organizations on climate change to be able to effectively engage policy makers on national and international issues. c. Research and domesticate the effect of climate change in Nigeria. d. Empower farmers to opt out of poverty to enable them avoid practices that induce climate change. e. Create green political movement to talk about climate change and sustainable development. Strategy development: Messaging Participants noted that messages that connect with the values that people, policy makers hold close, work better. Participants identified words like, Pikin in Nigeria, chop, coole, kampe body, beta life, paddy, hungry as local parlances that could connect values cherished values and climate change. Breaking down climate change message in a way local people will understand to appreciate the complex issue of climate change was also canvassed. Participants in a group fiery brainstorm developed messages that describe climate change. Campaign messages are supposed to be ambitious, simplified and audience specific. Some climate change messages developed in a local pigin English: a. As we de cut dry for our land na so we de naked our land and kpai our animals b. Weather wey de change don de kpafuka our money and we no get money again. c. Weather wey de do anyhow don kpafuka our river, our farmland no de grow food for us and our farmland no gree grow food again. d. Our weather don de harsh de go, our animal don de dry de go. e. My country people, Make we join hands togeda and make our environment fine. Make we no de throw yamayama inside gutter. If water fall e no go see we e go pass. Organizational action plans Participating Civil Society groups pledged to the following in their 2014 plan towards climate change.
  • 7. a. Hans Verolme of Climate Advisers Network and the facilitator of the workshop pledged to conduct similar training in Peru, South Africa and China. b. Fresh and Young Brain Initiatives pledged to work with other youths across the west Africa region in pushing youth issues on policy agenda of governments. c. CERI pledged to work with other groups to pursue other climate change issues in Nigeria. d. Dr. Nse pledged that her organization will reach the grassroots using the malaria and HIV strategies and mainstream climate change into other programs. e. 893 Concepts pledged to integrate climate change into other youth base issues in Abuja and promised to give young people their platform to talk about climate change. f. More community mobilization and integration on cc an all other areas in kwara state g. Women Environmental Program pledged to continue in their commitment of providing alternative energy to rural women. h. NEST pledges time and resources towards the establishment of green party i. Zaid Shopeju of Youth Vision Alliance Network (YVAN) pledged that his organization will continue in the simplifying climate change messages and the creation of mobile application for climate change for young people. j. Trees on Earth pledged to establish more tree planting clubs in schools in Kogi State and have more pupils engaged in the tree planting exercise in the state. k. Climate Change Network Nigeria represented by Surveyor Efik pledged to continue the mobilization of stakeholders in Nigeria to work in achieving policy issues on a national scale. He urged participants to come together under Climate Change Network Nigeria as a national platform for engaging policy makers. He also informed that CCN-Nigeria will soon become a national node of the CAN International. l. Green Content for Development pledged to continue in educating educate women and children on climate change related issues. m. DARE pledged to continue with their effort in clean cookstoves sector, especially in the in rural areas n. Professor Oladipo, Chairman Board of Trustees, CAN-Nigeria proposed the establishment of a National Strategist Think Tank on Climate Change with participating CSOs becoming automatic members and working on promoting the IPCC Reports/sustaining objectives of the catalyst workshop for national development and appropriate actions to combat climate change Closing: Surveyor Efik explained the logistics for the workshop and thanked GCCA/CAN-I for proving the support while he expressed his appreciation to HBS for picking part of the bills for the workshop. Hamzat Lawal, in his vote of thanks, thanked all participants and wished them safe journey back. A prayer finally closed the meeting at 5.01pm.

×