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11 exposition-figurativelanguage
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11 exposition-figurativelanguage

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  • 1. EXPOSITIONBackground information presented in aliterary work.From To Kill a Mockingbird: “Maycomb was an old town, but it was a tired old town when I first knew it. In rainy weather the streets turned to red slop . . . [s]omehow it was hotter then . . .”
  • 2. EXPOSITIONBackground information presented in aliterary work.
  • 3. Figurative LanguageThe body of devices that enables the writer to operate on levels other than the literal one. "Figures are as old as language. They lie buried in many words of current use. They occur constantly in both prose and poetry." (Joseph T. Shipley, Dictionary of World Literary Terms, 1970)
  • 4. Figurative LanguageTypes (not limited to these): Simile Metaphor Hyperbole Synecdoche Metonymy
  • 5. SIMILE A comparison of onething with a different thing
  • 6. METAPHORThe application of anidea or object tosomething that’s notliterally applicable
  • 7. HYPERBOLE An exaggerated claim“I’m so obsessed. My heart is bound to beat right out of my untrimmed chest.”
  • 8. SYNECDOCHEA reference tosomething as oneof its parts or viceversa
  • 9. “Skirt”- disparaging slang for a woman METONYMY Reference to something more loosely associated with what it represents