LOEX 2011 - Transliteracy

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LOEX 2011
Fort Worth, TX

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  • How did you get to this conference?By MiltonCJhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/miltoncorrea/3118589805/
  • Looked for a conference?Waited for LOEX?Looked at the program?Evaluated whether it would be beneficial?By http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidw/472529234/
  • Out of pocket?Write a grant?Travel funds?Some combination?Is the cost worth it?By the library of virginiahttp://www.flickr.com/photos/library_of_virginia/2899343224/
  • Fly?Train?Drive?Walk?What dates?Which hotel?By Florida Memoryhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/floridamemory/4203509136/
  • Weevaluated the merits of the conference, considered our needs and abilities, and determined the optimal means of travel.
  • Information literacy is about finding the best way from point A to point B. It’s about identifying an information need, selecting the best resources to get from A to B, evaluating the information gained, and resolving the need.But, evaluation is only part of what we do. Creating the best itinerary is only part of what we do.Think about the more concrete skills involved in getting here…By Spec-ta-cleshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/hey__paul/5573305472/
  • Did you register online?Write a travel grant?Poll colleagues on Twitter?Set up a conference alert feed in Google Reader?http://www.flickr.com/photos/julia_manzerova/4388356403/
  • Travelocity?An agent?Did you have to map out the timing?Did you set up trip alerts on your phone?By melloveschallahhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/melloveschallah/3562306837/
  • How do you get from the parking lot to the terminal?Are you familiar with security protocol?Can you read a building map?Did you give yourself enough time? Too much?By joiseyshowaahttp://www.flickr.com/photos/joiseyshowaa/2513692474
  • How did you figure out how to time the trip when you had to move from car to plane to train to foot?For how many of you was this your first time on a train?How did you manage to catch the right train if you’ve never done it before?Look up directions on a website?Appeal to your preexisting knowledge of how airports work?By Qfamilyhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/dasqfamily/3775600263/
  • My point is that there is a big difference between theevaluative part of travel and the operational part of travel.Evaluation is not operation.You could plan the world’s best itinerary, but get lost on the subway.You could know all about trains but need to cross an ocean.By daquellamanerahttp://www.flickr.com/photos/daquellamanera/124077565/
  • This is transliteracy: the trip.Information literacy can tell us how to evaluate the information out there.Transliteracy can tell us how best to actually work with that information, to get at it, to move it between formats, and to get from point A to point B.By www.flickr.com/photos/bass_nroll/422057721
  • Transliteracy is the ability to read, write, and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media.Transliteracies 2005PART 2007Libraries & Transliteracy 2010
  • Transliteracy is the ability to read, write, and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media.Transliteracies 2005PART 2007Libraries & Transliteracy 2010
  • Transliteracy is the ability to read, write, and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media.Transliteracies 2005PART 2007Libraries & Transliteracy 2010
  • Transliteracy is the ability to read, write, and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media.Transliteracies 2005PART 2007Libraries & Transliteracy 2010
  • Transliteracy is the ability to read, write, and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media.Transliteracies 2005PART 2007Libraries & Transliteracy 2010
  • Transliteracy is the ability to read, write, and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media.Transliteracies 2005PART 2007Libraries & Transliteracy 2010
  • Transliteracy is the ability to read, write, and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media.Transliteracies 2005PART 2007Libraries & Transliteracy 2010
  • Transliteracy is the ability to read, write, and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media.Transliteracies 2005PART 2007Libraries & Transliteracy 2010
  • Most of the current discussion of transliteracy is going on in two spheres:Public LibrariesLibrary technologyInstruction is only just beginning to apply this concept.
  • Students do not treat the library as the starting point, despite our best intentions.We think that the big issue is getting students to stop using Google and use the library.But, this approach isn’t going to lead anywhere. We need to rethink the library as just another stop on the information journey. Rather than discourage Google, Wikipedia, blogs, we should encourage their use and find a way to make the library fit.Once they graduate, they will lose access to library resources. Ask yourself: What am I doing to prepare them for that?http://www.flickr.com/photos/diylibrarian/1403798100/
  • Smartphones are on the riseVideo is dominantTablets are reshaping how we think about accessThe previous paradigm shift occurred in the 1980s as libraries survived (and changed) in response to the increasing prevalence of home computersThe new paradigm is the mobile paradigm.
  • Consider the hashtag.This is the first use of what is now a required part of successfully using Twitter.This is a new syntax and semantics created to take advantage of new media.In other words, language is changing, and what it means to “read and write”
  • It is becoming increasingly difficult to ignore video as a legitimate information source.It is becoming increasingly difficult to ignore the impact of Twitter on how we approach information.It is becoming increasingly difficult to say we are literate.So, we have digital literacy, web literacy, critical literacy, scientific literacy, information literacy, media literacy…etc. etc.How do we sort it all out???
  • The best way to divide up literacy is into figurative, and literal senses.In the literal sense, literacy is how we communicate: orality, print, visual, computer, web, etc.In the more figurative sense, literacy is how we evaluate and understand informationThis evaluative aspect can either be subject specific, or subject neutralBut, the unifying thread is that this is all information literacyBut, what about the literal literacies: the skill-based literacies?This is transliteracy.
  • Is ‘transliteracy’ a buzzword? In a word: yes. You’re going to see this cool-sounding word ‘transliteracy’ thrown around with no rhyme or reason. But, there is substantive research out there, and it would be dishonest to ignore the legitimate uses of transliteracy just because many treat it as the next “Library 2.0”Also, contra some advocates, I have elected to present transliteracy as conceptually distinct from information literacy for several reasons:Moving across or between the descriptive sense of literacy and the evaluative literacies is philosophically sloppy (Hume’s is/ought distinction) Info lit already provides a unifying structure for literacy in the figurative senseTransliteracy covers the oft-neglected operational literacies without stepping on the toes of IL. So, transliteracy, as I use it, is a complement to IL, not an umbrella term. I don’t want to delegitimize the important work done in IL over the past 25 years.
  • I’d like to try to make some sense out of transliteracy by looking at three pedagogical principles we can extract for the library classroom.These three principles are not alternate definitions of transliteracy.They are simple facts that follow logically from the definition of transliteracy.
  • Effective information use requires several information sources.Reading and writing across media requires that there be many media.By leoreynoldshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/lwr/4416908022
  • The library is not alone in the world of research.http://www.flickr.com/photos/will-lion/2595497078/
  • A recent article in First Mondayhttp://www.uic.edu/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/viewArticle/2830/2476Shows that students use a diverse array of information sources#1: Course readings#2: Google#3: Library databasesIt isn’t enough to focus on library resources alone.Good programs understand this already.But, I know that we’re struggling to incorporate non-library sources in instruction.http://www.flickr.com/photos/87913776@N00/5129607997
  • It’s hard to incorporate non-library sources:Lack of expertise on our parts?Tradition?Pressure from faculty?Ivory tower syndrome?So we often build a wall separating the library from the barbarians at the gates.So, we shouldn’t be surprised when students run right into that wall.Indexes? Databases? Keywords? Subject searching?The more we treat library research skills as fundamentallydifferent, the more students are going to struggle to understand them.
  • Rather than ignore outside resources, we need to embrace them.Transliteracy focuses on the ability to communicate across a range of media, so the first lesson of transliteracy is that we need to get comfortable with the fact that there is a range of media out there.Expand your instruction beyond the library walls.Your students are going to use non-library sources, so say something about them!!!Example: Junco (2011) on Twitter
  • Information sources do not stand alone, they interact.By leoreynoldshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/lwr/4318910816
  • Professors have blogs.Wikipedia is reliable.Scholarly publishing is moving online, open access.Peer-review takes place on Twitter, FriendFeed, and millions of blog comments.Current events drive the information explosion When the academics are using social media, and the non-academics are using peer-review, something has to give.Good programs understand this already.
  • Many IL programs already include discussion of Wikipedia, Google scholar, blogs, etc.Though alternative information sources are increasingly covered in library instruction, they are often segmented and compartmentalized. We cover Wikipedia, and then move on. Mention Google Scholar, and then move on. And so it goes. But, information is neutral with respect to technology. Information flows across technologies and the various means of access interact to shape and transform information.
  • As we saw, students hit a wall when they enter the libraryIf we stop emphasizing the DIFFERENCES between the library and the outside world, we can start chipping away.But, we also need to emphasize the INTERACTION between information sources.We need to show that Wikipedia/blogs/etc are connected to library research.
  • We need to stop treating information resources as wholly contained ecosystems and admit that they bleed into one another.Transliteracy is all about moving between media, so we need to focus on how media fit together and support one another.
  • Navigating across information resources requires transferable skills.You have to have skills that apply in multiple media.By leoreynoldshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/lwr/2677504428/
  • Most of the current discussion of transliteracy is going on in two spheres:Public LibrariesLibrary technologyInstruction is only just beginning to apply this concept.
  • Most of the current discussion of transliteracy is going on in two spheres:Public LibrariesLibrary technologyInstruction is only just beginning to apply this concept.
  • Your students come to class with a range of preexisting skills. Rather than start from scratch, figure out what they know and how to use it in instruction.Example: Holman (2011) argues that most IL focuses on a linear search, whereas internet tools have conditioned students to search by discovery (trial and error). They refine their search, rather than try to construct perfect syntax.Holman, Lucy. “Millennial Students’ Mental Models of Search: Implications for Academic Librarians and Database Developers.” The Journal of Academic Librarianship 37, no. 1 (2011): 19-27.
  • Believe it or not, apples and oranges are more similar than different.Stop treating popular information sources and library resources as incommensurate.Hashtags are subject headingsHyperlinks are footnotesEtc.
  • Transfer of Learning is well-defined in education. But library instruction does not seem to have caught on.A search of ERIC (CSA) for “Transfer of learning” yields 439 results.The preferred subject-heading “Transfer of Training” yields 4,015 results.A search of LISTA (EBSCO) for “transfer of learning” yields 14 results.The preferred subject-heading “Transfer of Training” yields 2 results.(May 5, 2011)
  • Admit that they use Wikipedia and use that to your advantage.Show them how the way they use one service is the way they’ll use library services.How they evaluate a website is how they will evaluate an article.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/raeallen/111030065
  • If you didn’t come at instruction from the standpoint of transferable skills, your students may be experts at evaluating information, yet unable to cope with regular interface changes.
  • Lupton Library has a small, but dedicated team of six library instructors serving 11,000 FTE.Through an emphasis on partnerships, we have managed to embed ourselves in the Freshman English curriculum.300-400 classes a year.ENGL 1010 and 1020A continuing curriculum between the two.We reach 79% of Freshmen.See Beverly’s talk later today.Our library instruction curriculum begins before the students even enter the room
  • Research question worksheet requires students to contextualize a topic by learning the arguments surrounding it, reading background information from Wikipedia, and generating a list of possible keywords to use.Students bring completed worksheet to library instruction.Result:Students not only come to class with a topic, but they’ve often discussed it with their instructor, they’ve read various points of view and they understand some of the surrounding issues. It’s not a topic anymore – it’s a question. They have used a familiar source to get the ball rolling, rather than
  • Using remote clickers, we quiz the students on effective information use, focusing on best practices for finding reliable info with Google. For example, we discuss bias, intent, and authority using popular websites, not academic articles. The skills will transfer. http://www.flickr.com/photos/vblibrary/4993073773
  • In a transliterate approach, the library is not privileged.So, in the transliterate classroom we often find that the library is not the best place to look for information.
  • This PRIMO Award-winning video relates the basics of library database navigation to more familiar resources.Research is like a gameWe use Wikipedia to develop keywordsMoreover, we only show one database, and trust that the lessons will extend to most databases.
  • Another PRIMO database, The World of Information shows students that the skills they use in their personal lives are similar to the skills they will use in library research.
  • The ability to apply and then reapply is crucial in developing transferable skills. http://www.flickr.com/photos/susanneanette/2990156824
  • The possibilities for incorporating new media and technology into the classroom are expanding.For an excellent overview, see Greg Bobish, Participation and Pedagogy: Connecting theSocial Web to ACRL Learning OutcomesIn the January 2011 JAL
  • For example, serious academics maintain regular blogposts.Brian LeiterDistinguished Professor and director at U of Chicago School of Law.Philosophy Professor
  • Another example: Use Wordle to find keywords.This is the LOEX program.Really, the ideas are endless.The point is that we need to teach students that info comes from many places, different services can be used in conjunction w/ one another, and the skills in one can transfer to another.
  • Obviously, if you are going to teach concepts related to new technologies, you have to be familiar with them. A recent initiative at Lupton Library did just that, teaching all librarians about blogs, Twitter, wikis, and beyond. Beverly’s 2008 LOEX talk.http://www.flickr.com/photos/matthamm/2945559128
  • We teach a full-semester, credit-bearing course on social media and new tech.Ranging from Facebook to Flickr to YouTube to Foursquare and beyond.You have to engage the students with what they know and improve their non-library skills
  • Our active workshop series includes workshops on free tools (open office, google docs, etc), classes on multimedia projects.We even spend a lot of time on Microsoft Office with an eye towards developing enhanced communication skills.http://www.flickr.com/photos/george_eastman_house/2871176480/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/ilovememphis/4514924028
  • By autumn blisshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/autumn_bliss/467766536/
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/rohdesign/152626650
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/potyike/4783170326/
  • QUESTIONS????http://www.flickr.com/photos/brent_nashville/5157879240

Transcript

  • 1. Bridging the Gaps:Transliteracy as Informed PedagogyLane WilkinsonUniv. of Tennessee at ChattanoogaLOEX 2011
    Walnut Street Bridge. Chattanooga, Tenn.
  • 2. How did we get here?
  • 3. Identify a need
  • 4. Secure funds
  • 5. Evaluate travel options
  • 6. From point A to point B
  • 7. This is information literacy
  • 8. The paperwork
  • 9. Buying the tickets
  • 10. Navigating the airport
  • 11. Catching the right train
  • 12. The itinerary ≠ the trip
  • 13. This is transliteracy
  • 14. What is transliteracy?
    The ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media.
  • 15. Transliteracy is about how we navigate an ever-increasing array of communication and information sources.
    What is transliteracy?
  • 16. It is about understanding how information sources fit together and how to make use of that fit.
    What is transliteracy?
  • 17. Not from libraries
    Where did it come from?
  • 18. 2005
    Transliteracies Project
    “a working group to study online reading”
    transliteracies.english.ucsb.edu
    Where did it come from?
  • 19. 2007
    PART: Production and Research in Transliteracy Group
    DeMontfort University
    nlabnetworks.typepad.com/transliteracy
    Where did it come from?
  • 20. 2010
    Libraries and Transliteracy
    A cross-section of public librarians and library technology experts
    Librariesandtransliteracy.wordpress.com
    Where did it come from?
  • 21. What is transliteracy?
    The ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media.
    Transliteracy is about how we navigate an ever-increasing array of communication and information sources.
    It is about understanding how information sources fit together and how to make use of that fit.
    Where did it come from?
    Not from libraries
    2005
    Transliteracies Project
    “a working group to study online reading”
    transliteracies.english.ucsb.edu
    2007
    PART: Production and Research in Transliteracy Group
    DeMontfort University
    nlabnetworks.typepad.com/transliteracy
    2010
    Libraries and Transliteracy
    A cross-section of public librarians and library technology experts
    Librariesandtransliteracy.wordpress.com
  • 22. So, what does this mean for library instruction?
  • 23. Research can’t be just about the library
  • 24. New media
  • 25. New linguistic competencies
  • 26. New literacies
  • 27. Literacy
    Descriptive
    Evaluative
    Information Literacy
    Transliteracy
    Subject-specific
    Subject-neutral
    Oral
    Print
    Scientific literacy
    Digital literacy
    Visual
    Health literacy
    Critical literacy
    Computer
    Web
    Economic literacy
    Media literacy
    Other subject specific literacies
    Other non-subject specific literacies
  • 28. A word of warning
  • 29. Three keys for library instruction
  • 30. #1: Effective information use requires several information sources.
  • 31. An explosion of information sources
  • 32. Students will use non-library sources
  • 33. But they hit a wall in the library
  • 34. Address non-library resources at the start
  • 35. #2: Information resources do not stand alone, they interact.
  • 36. Popular vs. Scholarly doesn’t cut it anymore
  • 37. Information doesn’t fit into compartments
  • 38. Break down the divisions
  • 39. Information resources are linked
  • 40. #3: Navigating the interaction requires transferable skills.
  • 41. “A mental model is…the user's mental image of a system and its capabilities that he employs to understand how to operate it.”(Holman 2011)
  • 42. “…if today’s students [search] by discovery,should then the focus of information literacy instruction be on more effective strategies for refining a search rather than on initially constructing a near-perfect search?” (Holman 2011)
  • 43. They already know how to do it
  • 44. Teach the analogy
  • 45. How do students use Wikipedia?
    (Head & Eisenberg 2011)
  • 46. Understand transferable skills
    make overt connections
    provide links to specific applications
    •focus on the purpose of strategies
    include time for student reflection
    consider how strategies might be adapted
    provide feedback to students
    provide opportunities to apply, re-apply and re-teach
    Perkins, D. N. & Salomon, G. Transfer of learning, in International encyclopedia of education. (Second ed.) Oxford: Pergamon Press 1992.
  • 47. Harness students’ existing skills
  • 48. Give them a way through
  • 49. For example: remember the “red” Lexis?
  • 50. Can your students still use it?
  • 51. The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
  • 52. Wikipedia before class
  • 53. Google versus the Library
  • 54. The library is not (always) the answer
    You moved off-campus, but now you’ve got roaches!
    Where’s the best place to find out which bug-spray is most effective?
    A. Off.com
    B. The Journal of Entomology
    Yahoo! Answers
    Ask Grandma
  • 55. Teaching the analogy
    http://www.youtube.com/v/dVETB3gaA2Y
    Slideshare does not support video embeds.
    The clip originally shown starts at 0:01
  • 56. The world of information
    http://www.youtube.com/v/od8oTWqaDxE
    Slideshare does not support video embeds.
    The clip originally shown starts at 0:40
  • 57. Ample time to search
  • 58. More to come
  • 59. Future possibilities
  • 60. Future possibilities
  • 61. But wait, there’s more!
  • 62. Social media training
  • 63. Beyond Facebook
  • 64. Workshops and beyond…
  • 65. Last words
  • 66. Your students’ trips are just beginning
  • 67. Information literacy is how they’ll plan
  • 68. Transliteracy is how they’ll get there
  • 69. lane-wilkinson@utc.edu librariesandtransliteracy.wordpress.com
    Thank you
  • 70. Images“How did we get here” http://www.flickr.com/photos/miltoncorrea/3118589805/“Identify a need”http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidw/472529234/“Secure funds”www.flickr.com/photos/library_of_virginia/2899343224/“Evaluate travel options”http://www.flickr.com/photos/floridamemory/4203509136/This is information literacyhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/hey__paul/5573305472/‘The paperwork’http://www.flickr.com/photos/julia_manzerova/4388356403/“Buying the tickets”http://www.flickr.com/photos/melloveschallah/3562306837“Navigating the airport”http://www.flickr.com/photos/joiseyshowaa/2513692474“Catching the right train”www.flickr.com/photos/dasqfamily/3775600263/“The itinerary is not the trip”www.flickr.com/photos/daquellamanera/124077565/“This is transliteracy”www.flickr.com/photos/bass_nroll/422057721‘What is Transliteracy’http://www.flickr.com/photos/greeblie/3338710223/Not just about the libraryhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/diylibrarian/1403798100/New mediahttp://www.flickr.com/photos/tabor-roeder/5601654995/New literacieswww.flickr.com/photos/81203773@N00/411770953
    Three keys
    www.flickr.com/photos/vek/2543518246/
    #1
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lwr/4416908022
    An explosion
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/will-lion/2595497078/
    Students will use non-library sources
    www.flickr.com/photos/87913776@N00/5129607997
    But they hit a wall
    ww.flickr.com/photos/ortizmj12/2366706532
    Address nonlibrary sources at the start
    www.flickr.com/photos/polvero/3466964233
    #2
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lwr/4318910816
    #3
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lwr/2677504428/
    ‘They already know how to do it’
    www.flickr.com/photos/ergonomic/3363073562/
    Teach the analogy’
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/automania/126698126/
    ‘Harness existing skills’
    www.flickr.com/photos/nationalmediamuseum/3588573761
    Give them a way through
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/raeallen/111030065
    Google versus the library
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/vblibrary/4993073773
    Ample time to search
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/susanneanette/2990156824
    Social Media Training
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/matthamm/2945559128
    Workshops and beyond
    www.flickr.com/photos/george_eastman_house/2871176480/
    Last Words
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/ilovememphis/4514924028
    Trips are just beginning
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/autumn_bliss/467766536/
    IL is how they’ll plan
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/rohdesign/152626650
    Transliteracy is how they’ll get there
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/potyike/4783170326/
    Thank You
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/brent_nashville/5157879240
  • 71. Reading List
    Bobish, G. (2011). Participation and pedagogy: connecting the social web to ACRL learning outcomes. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 37(1), 54-63.
    Brandt, D. S. (1997). Constructivism: teaching for understanding of the internet. Communications of the ACM, 40(10), 112-117.
    Head, A. J. & Eisenberg, M. B.. (2010). How today’s college-students use Wikipedia for dourse-related research. First Monday, 15(3). [Online]
    Holman, L. (2011). Millennial students’ mental models of search: implications for academic librarians and database developers. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 37(1), 19-27.
    Junco, R., Heiberger, G., & Loken, E. (2011). The effect of Twitter on college student engagement and grades. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 27(2): 119-132.
    Kjellberg, S. (2010). I am a blogging researcher: motivations for blogging in a scholarly context. First Monday, 15(8). [Online]
    Perkins, D. N. & Salomon, G. (1992). Transfer of learning, in International encyclopedia of education. (Second ed.) Oxford: Pergamon Press.
  • 72. Websites
    The Transliteracies Project transliteracies.english.ucsb.edu
    PART: Production and Research in Transliteracy www.transliteracy.com
    Libraries and transliteracy librariesandtransliteracy.wordpress.com